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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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216 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've just done it, and it works perfectly.

Why bother? Well that's the way Land Rover should have made it in the first place. L322s have threaded lines, I believe. And as a fan of engineering, those dodgy old collets and o-rings are total rubbish! Sure they seal OK, mine weren't giving me any trouble. But I had a leak in the block causing the rear to raise up overnight and I have two spare valve blocks, so what the hell. For a few bucks in parts, this mod worked perfectly. NO leaks - not a drop.

You need these parts:
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Five of the 6 mm fittings: four for the springs and one for the tank line
One of the 4 mm for the little exhaust line
Two of the 8 mm for the dryer line.

Then you need these drills and taps:

1.JPG


The exhaust fitting takes the same drill and tap as the air spring lines.

Remove the valve block and strip as per sticky thread from Paul P38A. Tape up all holes you're not going to be drilling. Drill the four holes - you really need a drill press (or a steady hand) and WD-40 on the bit. Don't worry too much about swarf getting into the block. It's just a series of passages and it can all be vacuumed out. Check every line with a bright torch for swarf before reassembly!

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Run the tap through the holes. Plenty of WD-40 or oil on the tap and reverse the tap every revolution. The larger drill and tap is for the dryer lines.
3.JPG


Clean it all up, replace all the internal o-rings as per Paul P38 and bolt the compression fittings on. You will need a good deal of torque to tighten them up - I used thread tape on all threads and long torque wrench so I could feel them biting in tight. Clamp the block in a vise with wooden battens to protect it when tapping it.

Ready to install:

4.JPG


Installed in the car. Not a leak anywhere!
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Next time it has to come out, it's with civilised brass nuts. The nuts are imperial - 7/16" for the 4 mm lines, 1/2" for the springs and tank and 9/16" for the dryer.

It's an easy and low cost mod.

Go on - You know you want to!

Good luck from Tom
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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972 Posts
Brave man. I don't have guts to drill / tap the VB.
BTW , what are those Ts doing there?
 

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148 Posts
I need to do the valve block seals on mine as well, and I have two spare blocks as well, so I’m definitely going to give this a go.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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216 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
So it's been on for 24 hours - no leaks. Car sitting nice and high. Result! (I've got the EAS timer disconnected and a standard relay in place)

My brass t-pieces lead off to my manual Schrader valves to let me pump up each spring in an emergency. They're a bit bulky but work a treat. There's a black plastic version that's just as good - don't know the name - avoid the ones with the blue ends. They leak.
 

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1,339 Posts
Very nice and a worthwhile upgrade! Especially if you add the Ts for manual inflation, I find that the extra/different stress on the airlines makes the pushfits more prone to leaking.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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972 Posts
Clean it all up, replace all the internal o-rings as per Paul P38 and bolt the compression fittings on. You will need a good deal of torque to tighten them up - I used thread tape on all threads and long torque wrench so I could feel them biting in tight. Clamp the block in a vise with wooden battens to protect it when tapping it.
With the compression fittings, do you need to install the o-rings too?
Also, I see an olive there in each fitting. Once removed aren't those olives need replacing?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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216 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
No, in a word.

The compression fittings replace the O-rings. When you clean out the block, pull them all out.

The olives in the lines can be undone and reused... I don't know how many times. Many, I think. You can buy spare olives. Just don't overtighten them. Enough to get a seal - that's all you need, you can feel them crimping and tightening up.

I've already had it apart again, to fit the tank gauge and tank fill point in the dryer (attached).
1.JPG
2.JPG


My EAS is now as tight as a fish's .......

**

My compressor cuts out at 130 psi. Overnight it dropped from 130 to 120 psi. Should I regard that as normal leakage?

Tom
 

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2000 P38 4.6 HSE
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63 Posts
Mine doesn’t leak any from the tank in a fortnight, FYI.
My gauge is on the line to the tank...
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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216 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
So is my gauge, yes. In the tank line.

It seems to drop to 120 psi then stay there. I drive it every day so I haven't had the chance to see if it drops further over time.

About to drill and tap the dryer connections. Stand by for photos.

Then I might do the tank fitting too. Then the air springs if I can find a way...
 

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1,075 Posts
Tapered thread fitting aren't used much for pressurized pneumatic systems for a reason. Really hard to get perfect seals. The straight thread with o-ring style would be better but then you would have to machine an o-ring groove into the valve block. I'm with you on the tees, but those aren't sealing on the threads.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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216 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Ah. I cut the threads, bolted in the fittings to seat them, removed them all, did a final clean and bolted them back in with plenty of teflon tape. No leaks so far. Doing the dryer at the moment with a spare dryer I have - stand by.

I was driving once and the pressed-in brass fitting on the bottom of the dryer blew off with a loud pop. I'm pretty sure I can thread that successfully too.
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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4,219 Posts
I did the same here in the UK last year as I had a spare VB and figured what the heck.

I have also done the tank fitting, and have a T in there for an air line off to my loadspace, with a shutoff and a quick connect fitting, so I can use it to check the air pressures in the tyres etc.

I used some Permatex (I think) high temperature thread sealing liquid on mine - it was white stuff rather than blue or red like loctite, and it's sealed them up a treat too. Definitely easier for removing the VB if required!
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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216 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I was going to to the tank too - no leaks there either though now.

Another great find from this forum - Permatex thread sealer. I'd never heard of it. Thanks Marty!
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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4,219 Posts
I have a leak somewhere still, which is annoying - I need to find the time and the enthusiasm to get back out there with some soapy water and try to trace it down. I lose tank pressure slowly, but haven't been bothered enough to do anything about it yet! I have a slightly beefier air compressor which will fill the tank from empty in just over 3 minutes, so it's not quite as wearing as it would be on the P38 compressor - but it's still one of those things that I know isn't right, and want to do something about!

I'll try to remember to check my tool box next time and see if it is Permatex who make it, I think it is, but if not I'll update - I'll try and get the exact name/product number too, to aid ordering if anyone wants it. I think I got it originally to reseal the likes of the pressure switch after taking that out of the block, but it's been useful in a lot of places!
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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216 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
This goo maybe: Permatex® High Performance Thread Sealant

If I had have known about that, I would have used it. Anyway.

The brass elbow that connects the compressor to the valve block is one of the tapered fittings, wrapped with teflon tape from the factory. So is the pressure relief valve and cut-off switch and none of those seem to leak.
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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4,219 Posts
I think it's actually this one: (The red packaging looks familiar!)

Permatex Thread Sealant

Going for the high temp range stuff seems like something I would do... but the stuff you linked to looks good too, and probably what I would go for next time.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Can this be used when fitting engine components like fan thermostats, glow plugs etc..?
 
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