RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i have just brought a colour coded bumper for my 96 dse rangie as my original has warped. i read the articule on replacing the rear bumper on this site but didnt see any mention of airbag sensors.is there any on the rear bumper that could effect the srs system that i need to worry about or is it a straight forwad swap(well as straight forwad as not having to mess with any sensors!)

thanxs :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
As rrtoadhall states, US models don't have rear crash sensors.
I never found any on my 1995 SE either. The only ones I know of are at the front.
Even these don't have any physical contact with the front bumper, so swap away with no worries.
 

·
LIFETIME CONTRIBUTOR
Joined
·
5,346 Posts
I've never heard of rear airbag sensors on a car. I can't imagine you'd want the airbags going off in a rear end collision.

But then, I haven't kept up with technology.

Or are you confusing rear airbag sensors with the sensors which trigger the rear airbags (some cars have air bags for rear seat passengers)?

Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Bumper

I can confirm there are no sensors on the bumper, I removed mine recently from a UK 1996 2.5DT to fit a towbar and apply rustproofing, and found nothing but dirt, cobwebs and rust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Usually the SRS system is incorporated into two crash (deceleration) sensors at the front of the vehicle and these chat constantly with the airbag module in the dash. This system monitors the forces being exerted on the vehicle and asks the sensors 200 times per second if an airbag firing is necessary. SRS airbags are triggered by rapid deceleration above a certain threshold (usually 15 mph). A rear-end collision is a rapid acceleration so unless you get rear-ended and gain enough speed to hit the vehicle in front of you with force enough to inflate the airbags, they should not go off in a rear-end smack.

Newer cars take all sorts of things into account before firing the airbags. They determine your speed, how quickly you hit or get hit, whether you're wearing a seatbelt or not, where your seat is positioned, etc to determine whether to fire the airbag and if so, at what speed (reduced or full). I'm sure that's more than you've ever wanted but my enlightenment is free. :wink:
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top