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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys, i started a topic a while back ago about my coolant problems, and was never able to get it fixed, with work being so insanely busy i haven't had time to get out there and work on it. But due to me recently wrecking my bmw, i have to get this problem fixed so i can use it as a Daily Driver. I tightened up the hose clamps on the front where i thought the leak was coming from. Stopped the leak from coming out of that spot. But as i drove it around town, and parked it it started leaking from behind the engine.... I need to target where the problem is coming from so i can fix it. I took some pictures of the areas i'm talking about.

this here is where all the liquid is coming down onto and leaking all on the ground.



Water is not cycling through the top hose from the radiator, i looked throughout my Haynes manual trying to see where it shows whether or not it's supposed to be going through that hose. I certainly feel like a dumb ass about that one, i thought that was the main source of water from the radiator to the engine... or is it vice-verca? Any help is much appreciate thanks!

Zach
 

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Coolant will only cycle through the radiator once the thermostat opens up. If you're finding no coolant is passing through there, it's most likely one of these:

1. Coolant not warm enough to open thermostat
2. Thermostat seized shut
3. Far too little coolant in the system.

As for the leak, I'd tackle hoses first. From the description, it could be one of the hoses going to or from the heater core. But the source of the liquid under the engine is not always indicative of the leak position, so you really need to pinpoint that. If you can't do it yourself, I'd recommend getting a shop to pressure-test the coolant system for you, then you'll know for sure.
J
 

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Yes hoses to heater core are probable. I would get the Rover to operating temperature and leave it running, open the hood - look for leaks at all hoses. Turn it off and do the same, except this time with the engine off listen for the leak as well. I found a leak I had only when it was running and was at operating temperature (a pinhole leak in the upper radiator hose)

Parker
1993 LWB Plymouth Blue
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the responses guys. I just replace the thermostat and thermostat housing gasket about 45 minutes ago.. Waiting for the gasket sealant to dry up then i'll give it a test drive and see if it leaks. It was leaking pretty bad from the bottom of the housing when i opened up the hood yesterday so hopefully that was the problem... although it just seems like there's something creating pressure behind the whole system because when i replaced the water pump it seemed to stop the leak for about a day, then it began again in a different area (the thermostat housing i assume now)... hopefully this was the problem and i don't have to tear it apart to much more. Thanks again for the advice guys.

Zach
 

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ZLandrum said:
... although it just seems like there's something creating pressure behind the whole system because when i replaced the water pump it seemed to stop the leak for about a day, then it began again in a different area (the thermostat housing i assume now)...
This is pretty normal. It's a pressurized system, so when you open the system you let the pressure out. The first day, after changing the pump, there was only a small amount of pressure in the coolant system. It can take a few miles for the system to pressure back up, so once you've fixed the main leak, the minor ones will start showing up.

I have a persistent leak in my coolant system, but as I only have to top up about a cup of coolant every 5-600 miles, I'm not *too* concerned. I got the main leaks taken care of, so I'm good for now ;)
 

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dont forget to "bleed" system. When heater hoses or thermostat is removed system needs to be filled from metal tower on heater hoses to insure no air is in system, instructions are in haynes manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hmm, ok i replaced the thermostat, and gasket and now it's not cranking up now. it turns over and over, and sounds like it wants to start, but doesn't I checked the Haynes manual to re-read the directions of what i may have missed putting the Thermostat back on, and in the manual it didn't say anything about "bleeding the system" although when the problem started that it wouldn't start up i went out to the rover and opened the radiator and water spewed (cold engine) so obviously there's air in the system now. Would someone please explain to me how to "drain" the coolant system. I feel like this may be the area that's giving me the problems. Thanks again for the responses already, it's helped immensely! More so than the Haynes manual.

Zach
 

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Zach, the no start issue most likely has nothing to do with the changing of the thermostat. When I changed mine I did not move the distributor, though moving it or removing it would have made the job much easier. You probably knocked some of the wires leading to the distributor loose. CHeck that first. Or you may have gotten some water in the distributor. Check the leads to distributor first, then if that was not the issue, I would remove the distributor cap and make sure it is dry. Some guys use WD40 to get the water out of the cap.

In regards to the draining and bleeding of the cooling system please do a seach and you will see many recommendations. To drain the system - remove the cap/fill cap on the radiator, the overflow resiviour cap, and the cap on the top of the heater hoses (to the left of the plenum). Then remove the bottom hose from the radiator. This will drain the system. I would also flush it while you are at this stage (do search). Then replace bottom hose and use the bleeding procedures from the manual and/or your search here.

I would suggest getting the Rover to start first. You will need it running to do a proper bleeding of the system. If you get it started I would try bleeding the system at that point if you coolant is in good shape.

I am no expert. However, I have drained and bled the system and had a water problem with the distributor that caused a no start issue as you describe.

Parker
1993 LWB Plymouth Blue
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the info Parker - gives me some more stuff to look at! I just hate it when i feel like i've hit a brick wall and i don't know what else to do, thanks Again and i'll keep you guys posted.

Zach
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok, i haven't got much knowledge, if any at all about the distributer. When getting to the thermostat housing, i removed the bulb type thing that's attached to the side of the distributer (on the right in the stock photo i found) while pulling it off, it was pulling out what looked like a metal cord. So i put it back on, but i'm affraid that may be the cause of my problems that i'm having with it turning over the way it does. Is there something i can do to correct this, or am i in need of a whole new distributer? Thanks guys, all the help has been very appreciated.


Zach
 

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Yes that part was in my way too. It is for your vacuum advance and is most likely your problem. I hope someone else will chime in and help you fix your problem (that's out of my kowledge bank). Your movement of that part could surely cause a no start condition.

Parker
1993 LWB Plymouth Blue
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I hope someone can help also! Thanks for your input thus far though Parker, it's been much appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well fellas, i took apart the distributer and sure enough i had disconnected the arm from the vacuum pump from the rotor of the distributer, kinda put it back together (pushed the arm down, and turned the rotor counter-clock wise 'till it sat on the vacuum arm) tried turning it over, and it cranked right up!

The coolant leak now seems to be coming from a hose up front, letting the rover cool down to remove it and replace it, then see where else the leak is coming (if at all, hopefully not)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the link, parker. It ended up that the heat hose was the main problem. Was able to find a L tube that fit the rover just right and installed it, and tada it's fixed, and i'm back on the road with it. Although i think i messed up the distributer some how, 'cause the firing seems off. I'm going to ask the local Rover specialist to see if he can take a look at it.
 

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I would try checking the timing with a timing light. With all you did to the distributor it is probably just out of time. Also check your other vacuum hoses and all the leads from the distributor. Make sure they are tight.

Parker
1993 LWB Plymouth Blue
 

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Discussion Starter #18
So, i replaced pretty much everything for the coolant system, except for the radiator and the Rover is now over-heating. I drove it about 10 miles from my house, and it began to overheat as i was driving, so i pulled over and opened the hood, and the oil was coming out of the dip stick area. So i went to advanced auto down the road and got some coolant, and oil - put more oil in and it took a whole bottle and a half of coolant to top it off. It's not leaking any where not that i've sealed everything up - but it's over heating, and since i've put both of those in there the tail pipe is blowing out white smoke.... anybody know what my problems may be now? I'm taking it to EuROVER (local rover genius) tomorrow to get it re-timed, so i'm hoping that will help with everything.. Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thanks-

Zach
 

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Zach, all my instincts tell me not to start your engine. If oil was flowing out your dipstick tube, it may be because the oil is floating on another liquid, coolant. That means that your coolant went from the cooling system into your crankcase. Check your oil level. If the level is normal with only brown oil on the dipstick then my fears are unfounded. If the dipstick is covered in "mayonnaise," emulsified motor oil and coolant, then DO NOT start your engine.

Coolant is a lousy lubricant. If your oil pump injects coolant into your engine's bearings they will wear very quickly. An engine with a failed head gasket that puts coolant into the oil can sometimes be saved to run again with a new headgasket and a couple of changes of oil in rapid succession. Ask your Rover experts about it, and you'll likely get some good info on it.

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for the response skucera - I just got back from my rover specialist, and the Rover overheated the whole way there (about 11 miles away). Once i got there we let the pressure out of the cooling system and had a look see. I check the dip stick and it did not have any coolant or "mayonnaise" type substance on it, But when we pulled the distributer out to redo the timing, there was a milky substance in the engine. So my rover guy told me that he suspects it to be a failed head gasket, and to replace that - but while replacing he suggested i look in the engine to see if there's any cylinder sleeves that have come loose. I'm thinking i may try and tackle the Head Gasket myself, as for him to do it it would cost more than what i actually paid for the rover in the first place. I've got a cousin who's much more mechanically inclined than i am, so with him, the Haynes manual, and this site i feel like i should be able to do the gasket myself. Anyone have any suggestions or clues or ideas on changing head gaskets that they think may be helpful? Thanks again guys, you've all been a big help-

Zach
 
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