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The EAS kicker is a neat reset tool if you can't be bothered making up the cable. I couldn't. Plus you can carry it with you.


If you have leaks in the valve block diaphragm it will throw the fault when it senses the compressor isn't charging the tank. Best to rebuild both the VB and the compressor at this stage. Kits from X8R on eBay and others. Avoid the cheap kits from China. They're rubbish
 

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Problem with the Kicker is that it clears the fault but doesn't tell you what it was, so you just end up having to clear it more and more often. The advantage with the software and cable is that you can see what the system is doing and why it is flagging a fault. An iffy height sensor will cause a fault but you'll never know what it is or which sensor with a Kicker.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I’ve got the Bearmach Hawkeye which is a great bit of kit but not the blue adapter which you need for the air suspension! So far I’ve tried about five different places and no one has one. The manufacture is waiting for delivery from China which will be about three weeks! If anyone can help, that would be great!
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Well, not much progress.
I managed to get down to my Land Rover independent which was only 1 mile away. His code reader checked out the whole car apart from the air suspension and it only saw one fault on the passenger seat memory!
When he clicked onto air suspension it said it couldn’t connect or something like that!
What does that mean!? I thought maybe the BCM maybe faulty but having spoken to Turner’s in Hemel Hempstead they said that is highly unlikely. The guy I spoke to, Eric seemed to be highly knowledgeable and said that if I could get the car to him they would probably sort it out in a short while and any other problems associated with the EAS.
Problem is getting the car to them, 40 miles away thereabouts without any suspension!

He suggested pulling the airline out of the top of the air filter and pressurising the system from the compressor to raise it to a rideable height. I tried this but even though my compressor Is a very good DIY compressor I can’t make anything happen as I don’t think it goes to such a high enough psi.

problems, problems.
 

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Earlier it was mentioned using jumper wires to reset the ECU. While I pointed out that this isn't possible, it is possible to operate individual EAS functions when in hard fault. There are two different connectors you can do this from to run the compressor and fill individual bags, one at the EAS ECU and another at the valve block. You want to run the compressor to fill the reservoir then jump the individual valve to lift each corner. You do this with the ECU disconnected because in hard fault, it will drop you back down if its connected. There should be more info on pinouts in other posts and the archived material from the old forum. You can use this to test functionality as well as get some air in the there for the ride to the reset guy. But also consider that taking it to someone for reset is probably as expensive as buying the RSW cable and you will have it forever.
 

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The one I linked to earlier. Have a look under the passenger seat, you should see a tall, black, timer relay (double the height of a normal relay). If this has been removed or replaced with a standard 4 pin relay, diagnostics won't connect. Some people replace the timer relay with a standard one so the EAS is only powered when the ignition is on. With the timer relay in place it wakes up and self levels every 6 hours or so but if you have a leaking air spring the car will drop to the bumpstops when left as it drops the other 3 corners to match the lowest one. By putting a standard relay in it doesn't wake up so you can see which corner is dropping. It should be used as a diagnostic tool and not left in there permanently.
 
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Discussion Starter #28
Yep, saw that tall relay, it's in place.

I want the suspension as it should be. I'm not looking at doing a cheapy job, just to get it correct.

I have asked my other local LR indie to call round and try his diagnostic reader on my car. If his also reads, "cannot connect " when air suspension is selected than I may well trailer it to Turners in Hemel Hempstead............A pain but they are P38 experts.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Deep Joy!

I was reading the beginners guide to the electronic air suspension for the range Rover P 38 that may have been suggested on here or I found on the web, I can't recall. It refers to the ECU for the air suspension which is under the passenger seat. No one has mentioned this apart from the relay next to it. I took off the plastic cover behind the trim panels and low and behold, the large multi pin connector wasn't connected! I connected this and switched on the ignition, no messages on the dashboard which was good. I started it up and immediately the car rose to full height. I played around with the switch for a while taking it to all levels, all ok. I finished off with about a 20 mile drive and all stayed well.

Bloody fantastic!

I will put back all the trim panels tomorrow, check and have a general play around with the system.

Ride quality is definitely better than with springs although I think this can be improved as the car still has the original 19-year-old dampers fitted. I would say the ride is on the soft side which I don't mind but compared to my 2007 Mercedes ML320, it is definitely less composed. It may be that this is how it should be as the Mercedes runs air suspension as well but is of a later generation. It may also be because this car is fitted with Nexan cheap tyres! Why oh why do owners of these type of cars go for budget tyres?

So on a separate note, what make and model dampers would be recommended for my car? I'm definitely not looking for the cheapest but what would give the best ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Just to sum up. My car seems to be running on original pump, valve block, height sensors and just has new air springs fitted. Again, why oh why did the previous owner have a spring kit fitted?
 

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Discussion Starter #31
And again, thank you everyone for your input. You guys weren't to know that a basic schoolboy error of an ECU unplugged was the main cause of problems!
 

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Original shocks were Boge. Fronts are still available (STC3672 | Shock Absorber Front P38 Air Spring - Land Rover Part STC3672) but unfortunately rears aren't. Personally I'd risk £32 on a pair of the Britpart ones (STC3671 | Shock Absorber Rear Air Susp P38 - Land Rover Part STC3671) and if they aren't up to it, put a pair of Monroes on.

I suspect the original air springs started to perish and leak, as they do when they get to 15-18 years old, and left the PO on the bumpstops so he went for something that wouldn't. Might be worth treating the compressor to a refurb but unless it starts dropping when parked overnight, leave the valve block until it does.
 

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Result.

See my reply #13 where I mentioned the EAS ECU. There it was!

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Thanks for that.

I thought that the BCM and the EAS ECU were the same!

ust checked , car is still, “up”!

Happy days!
 

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Stick around here and you'll be an expert pretty soon!

The P38 is the only car that will have you boasting to your family when things work.

'Look son; no book symbol on my HEVAC panel, AND my EAS is working superbly'. Cue quizzical looks. If only they knew what we go through..
 
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