Range Rovers Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
361 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m getting all new ball joints on my truck later this week. I’m going to have new axle seals installed during the process FTC4822. Other than pads and rotors if they are bad is there anything else I should have done while it’s torn apart? I’ve already done new D bushings and anti sway bar links and steering dampener. Aside from a new panhard and drag link that is an all new front end. Truck kind of “wanders” and when I change lanes driving the steering feels “floaty”. Loose steering and not tight. I’m hoping this work will make the steering tight and responsive.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,226 Posts
Drag link and track rod will make the steering wander if there is any slack in the ball joints. Knowing from another thread that this sort of thing isn't checked annually in the US, unlike our annual MoT test where any play would be noted, chances are they will be worn.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
361 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes Richard. For sure the ball joints are bad.
131k miles and I’m sure they are original equipment. Very much toast.
I’m just finally getting to it. I’ve got an Indy mechanic who is going to help me out
a garage with heat goes a long way when it’s 20 degrees F.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
At 131k miles, you probably got few more miles before wheel bearings start to go bad, but since you'll have the front axle end apart, mind as well replace them. I opted to replace the entire hub assembly, which translated to more $. If you have necessary tools available, you can opt to just replace the bearings.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
1,582 Posts
I have just rebuilt my front end a month or two back so it is still fresh in my mind. I am now on with the rear axle.
I replaced all the bushes and ball joints; and I also did the wheel bearings as I am chasing a vibration.
You didn't mention the radius arm bushes which should be changed for OEM (needs a special L/R tool). Panhard rod bushes are easy. Stick with OEM bushes all round.
When doing the ball joints remove the top first, so you can get at the bottom one and replace it last (thanks to no10chris for advice). The tool is available on Ebay and Amazon.
I took everything apart, rust proofed and repainted and fitted new bolts all round. I retapped all threads and I fitted a new ball joint adjuster on the bottom. Coppaslip on everthing. Cleaned and greased ABS sensor and brake caliper sliders using silicone grease.
I welded up my own 20 tonne hydraulic press to press the bearings out and I fitted Timken bearings, not cheap. One of the old bearings was a bit pitted at 162,000 miles. The other was OK but I replaced it with new anyway. New front propshaft, new seals, new CV joints. Hopefully it is going to last another 19 years and see me out.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
361 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
All good points. Thanks man. I have lots of notes. For repair now. Thanks much
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
392 Posts
I have just rebuilt my front end a month or two back so it is still fresh in my mind. I am now on with the rear axle.
I replaced all the bushes and ball joints; and I also did the wheel bearings as I am chasing a vibration.
You didn't mention the radius arm bushes which should be changed for OEM (needs a special L/R tool). Panhard rod bushes are easy. Stick with OEM bushes all round.
When doing the ball joints remove the top first, so you can get at the bottom one and replace it last (thanks to no10chris for advice). The tool is available on Ebay and Amazon.
I took everything apart, rust proofed and repainted and fitted new bolts all round. I retapped all threads and I fitted a new ball joint adjuster on the bottom. Coppaslip on everthing. Cleaned and greased ABS sensor and brake caliper sliders using silicone grease.
I welded up my own 20 tonne hydraulic press to press the bearings out and I fitted Timken bearings, not cheap. One of the old bearings was a bit pitted at 162,000 miles. The other was OK but I replaced it with new anyway. New front propshaft, new seals, new CV joints. Hopefully it is going to last another 19 years and see me out.

I needed a 50 tonne press from work to get my bearing out, and that could just do it..
My own 30 tonne press did manage to get the new bearing with out to much pain.


Don't buy the cheaper ball joints, this job you only want to do once!
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
1,582 Posts
Reinhoud,

I already had a 20 tonne bottle jack and an old steel beam, so I decided to made my own press. It turns out this was a mistake, as for what I spent on bits I could have bought one cheaper. I also stuffed my back up, but that is another story.

I have done four hubs so far. The middle bit needs to be pressed out first, then the bearing from the outer part of the hub. A new bearing is then pressed in followed finally by the middle part with the wheel studs. That is 4 "pressings" per hub or 16 times in total I have used the press in anger.

My press doesn't have a gauge but assuming that "normal" pressure on the jack handle gives 20 tonnes, then from my experience two of the bearings started to shift at around 15 to 20 tonnes. On two others I had to put a bar on the handle so I would guess it was over its rating. I would guess 25 to 30 tonnes. One was particularly tight and I had to persuade it with a heavy hammer and a drift to get it to move. I damaged the press. It bent a 12mm steel plate! at the top which I need to go back and fix. It is a hazardous operation. Some of the bearings came out with a big bang.
Reassembling the hubs with new bearings was straight forward. They pressed in easy after the housings were cleaned up. I used a proper penetrating fluid on the old bearings. I found that heating the outside of the hub with a propane torch didn't do much to get the old bearings out.

The inner and outer parts of the bearing come apart and one of the most difficult jobs was getting the inner bearing race off the shaft. Listening to others I ended up using a Dremel with a cutting disc and I cut a groove along the bearing then split it with a cold chisel. If you know a better way let me know. Instead of destroying the bearing, it would be nice to be able to press it off.

I used two Timken roller bearings which are around £90 each and I put them on the front. I already had some other wheel bearings in the garage which were a make you have never heard of. On closer inspection they are ball bearings. You get what you pay for I guess. The ball joints I used were Lemforder which I am told is OEM.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top