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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took my truck (2006 HSE) in today to get the right tierod done ($221Cdn) They mentioned my rear bushing are gone. I reviewed the posts here and on youtube about replacing the upper and lower bushing, but has anyone here replaced the whole arm? I note there are two bushings in the back as well.

Thanks Colin
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Both Control arms on the front wheels are no big deal, bolts are REALLY tight, and may be seized to the bushing liners, but its probably a 2-3 hour job per side (less if you've done it before) if you don't run into seized bolt issues. You can buy just the bushings for the control arms but its quicker, easier, and probably cheaper to replace the whole arm. By the time you pull the control arms out, take them to someone to press the old bushings out and new ones in you've probably spent as much money as just doing the whole arm.

Rear axle control arm bushings are another story, they are hard to access and you can almost guarantee that you will have to cut the bolts out to get the control arms out.. The outer upper and lower rear hub rose bushings (the ones that connect the wheel hub to the control arms are relatively easy, but you need a special bushing press to get them in and out.
 

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Colin, which bushings did they say were bad - The rear inners, outers or both? The rear lower control arm is expensive. There are only two wear items on it, the two inner bushings that are individually replaceable. The only reason I can see to replace the entire control arm is if it has damage or you don't want to replace each of the bushings individually. I'm guessing they are referring to the outer upper and lower bushings that @MARK_C is describing.

The rear outer upper and lower bushings are the most common that wear out. They are technically ball joints. When they go bad you get a squeaking / creaking noise in the rear suspension as it goes over bumps. Maddening.

If the bolts are corroded, it's a total PIA. The upper bushing and bolt seize together with corrosion. I used a map/oxy torch to get the bolt red hot along with an air hammer to loosen it up. Cutting the bolt will allow you to separate it from the control arm but won't allow the Laser bush tool to remove the bushing since it has a threaded bolt that must go through the bushing.

Replacing them is pretty straight forward once you get the bolts out using the laser bush tools, one for upper and one for lower. The lower one is really the special tool as it has a cutaway so you can remove the bush without having to remove the rear disk brake assembly and removing the brake dust shield, a real time saver. The upper one can probably be done with most any universal press tool as long as you have the right size cups/socket.

When installing, use new bolts if they are corroded. The bolts have a anti-corrosion coating on them. Also use copper anti-seize paste on the bolts to make it easier the next time you have to remove.

Just a word of caution - Steer clear of the MOOG K200836 upper bushing on RockAuto. They are not the correct size and I informed them of that. They slide in with zero resistance. Rave states that there needs to be at least 30nm of resistance or the hub needs to be replaced. I'm starting to figure out that closeouts on RockAuto include parts that have known issues. I have had really good luck with the AC Delco & Delphi components.

Laser Bush Tools:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So I do have to replace the rear suspension control arms on both sides. OEM parts here would cost me about $4,000 CAD. My plan is to order likley Chinese made arms for $250 each and install them. Take the OEM arms and slowly rebuild them with good quality bushings by Lemfoeder which seem to be one of the better brands out there. The reason I am going this route is that it will take me some time to get the old bushings out, get the new parts and find a place that is willing to press them in. I just had the engine for my Series done, that took the shop 8 months to do. We have a shortage of shops and technicians , so getting anyone to do stuff here is getting harder and harder. this way I have the vehicle back on the road in a couple of days and if they fail in a couple of years, I have a good quality part ready to go.

What I am looking for is part numbers for the rear suspension arm left and right, for a 2006 HSE L322. Any help is appreciated.
 

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What I am looking for is part numbers for the rear suspension arm left and right, for a 2006 HSE L322. Any help is appreciated.
You're saying the whole control arm is bad & not just the bushings?

You can call your nearest LR dealership & get the part numbers from them, and when you give them your VIN #, they make sure it's the right part.
That said, from what I see from a dealership sales website:
Upper left is RGG000070
lower left is LR023714
Upper right is RGG000060
lower right is LR023714

That's from one online source I use, and if you want the part #s for genuine bushings, you can look there yourself:
Rear Suspension for 2006 Land Rover Range Rover | Suburban Auto Parts

Using those, you could probably find used & maybe new genuine, & surely find aftermarket on Ebay.

Rock Auto has bushings, if that's all you need to replace:
2006 LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER 4.4L V8 Control Arm Bushing | RockAuto

Too bad you can locate a local machine shop or mechanic with a press that can do it at about 10 minutes +/- per bushing.
I've dropped-off control arms & new bushings at a local small shop in the morning & they've always had them ready for pick-up by the end of the day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks I just found those numbers as well. Sadly all the machine shops in my part of town closed up. The closest is the one I mentioned with a huge backlog of work. Real Estate here in Vancouver is so expensive that people working normal jobs can't afford to live here, so everyone is scrambling for experienced workers and most of the existing places the staff are all over 45 or much older. Does not bode well for the future.
Now to track down the bolt and nut numbers. I loved the old Rover North catalogues for the Series trucks, with detailed exploded view diagrams with parts numbers, so you always ordered the right bolt.
 

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I think I would go the Ebay route and buy some used ones and pop the inner bushings and the outer hub bushings in those, and then swap them. Prevents you from having to do the job twice. and you will have completely new OEM arms. Like heres an upper that looks brand new for $94, and the seller has the opposite side available as well.

 

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I think I would go the Ebay route and buy some used ones and pop the inner bushings and the outer hub bushings in those, and then swap them. Prevents you from having to do the job twice. and you will have completely new OEM arms. Like heres an upper that looks brand new for $94, and the seller has the opposite side available as well.
That's a great and the best option.
1 step better would be if there might by chance be a used set on Ebay that have had the bushings replaced already, but not so likely.

...in a perfect world...
 

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FCP Euro has them, all around $200 each for the different arms. I don't exactly know what "Eurospares" is, if that's a manufacturer or a broker for cheap parts. Still sounds like the best option in this case with the constraints explained. One strange thing I noticed in the search on FCP, I initially searched for the '12 model year, my year. They all came up with pricing. When I changed to '06, one was missing and only showed the $1800 LR part. Weird as they all use the same part.
 

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I don't exactly know what "Eurospares" is, if that's a manufacturer or a broker for cheap parts.
I've used a few Eurospare parts & have had no problem with them. I think a few cooling hoses, coolant parts like the pump and thermostat maybe, mostly for my 2003 since for the 2012s (RR & Jag XJ), I try to use as much genuine JLR as reasonably (to me, personally) within value.
After the first 5 years or so of using some Eurospare parts that haven't let me down (yet anyway), I trust them as much as a MotorRad, or any other aftermarket.
This is a pic of the pump I removed from my 2012 RR that apparently the indy shop (that worked on it for the previous owner) that swears they "only use genuine JLR parts" when I've looked into them for potential repars. Apparently they don't!
BUT it has not failed- I just removed it during the course of trying everything else to find my nagging cooling gremlin (BEFORE the ultimate hail-Mary that I'll get around to eventually of pulling the heads to look for warped heads/block). So I replaced most everything, and used Genuine JLR (out of personal preference, not need).

TMI WARNING: details - I've tried a few leak "repair" snake oils, Blue Devil, a couple of Bars Leak products, without any of them really taking care of it. So although I never had any indications of the cooling system being blocked-up (I thoroughly flushed each out after not getting results I wanted), although when I vacuumed-out the oil cooler it did seem it may have been a little congested, I just wanted to get all new parts in. There was no indication of the snake oils in the parts I removed anyway, and as always it runs just fine in all conditions.

This is the back of that pump, you can see the EuroSpares logo. I'm guessing it's made by the same supplier as many other "OEM" aftermarket (and maybe genuine JLR parts too), but customizes the logo markings for the Customer - EuroSpare in this case.
Or maybe the vendor puts their specific logo on after getting an unbranded pump from the manufacturer.
BUT this is the Eurospare logo...
Bicycle part Gas Rim Automotive wheel system Auto part


So as of now, both of our 2012 5.0L AJ133s have new genuine JLR pumps, BUT if one fails - I've got a good Eurospare ready to install if needed.
 

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I personally would never knowingly buy any part made by Uro. Read this forum thread....more information here than you will ever want to know:

 

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I personally would never knowingly buy any part made by Uro. Read this forum thread....more information here than you will ever want to know:

Thank you for your opinion, and I'll keep that in mind if I'm looking for parts for an old Mercedes.
I fully expect and understand that there are testimonials to Europarts being bad, and I also know that there are for ANY brand, including genuine JLR parts.
BUT from my own personal experience, I haven't had any problems with parts that I've personally used from them.
Personal experience.
That said, I still prefer genuine JLR parts over them - for the most part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Aftermarket part quality control is a problem throughout the industry, you can see youtube and forum posts on the subject for newer cars, older, domestic, imports.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I think I would go the Ebay route and buy some used ones and pop the inner bushings and the outer hub bushings in those, and then swap them. Prevents you from having to do the job twice. and you will have completely new OEM arms. Like heres an upper that looks brand new for $94, and the seller has the opposite side available as well.
Mark
I chewed on this for a bit and it did make sense, I ordered some used take off ones. Now to hunt down the bushings and the nut/bolts and a place willing to do it.
 
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