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LEGACY VENDOR
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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801 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello All:

I haven't posted in a while, so I thought I'd pose questions/thoughts to those who have had this problem, or are having it now.

I have been driving with this rear propeller shaft center bearing surround failure for quite a while now, simply not accelerating hard to avoid the inevitable grating that happens when the axle shaft hits the parking brake flange (see pic). It's worse now, though, and now it doesn't matter how delicately I accelerate.

I picked up a replacement center bearing assembly; it's a lot less expensive than buying an entirely new rear prop shaft, and, supposedly - if you do it right (marking the positions during disassembly, etc) - you avoid the commonly expressed concern about vibration post-fix.

So here's my question: the design of this center bearing hard rubber surround seems insufficient: prone to croak. It's weak. Has anyone replaced this center assembly and stiffened/protected the hard rubber bearing isolation donut by filling both sides of the cavity flush to the loop with a semi-hard RTV or similar, thus encapsulating that donut? I would think doing so would serve two purposes: protect the main rubber bearing support, as well as providing it supplemental structural support, but without making it TOO stiff.

Also: I noticed that the front u-joint appears to be leaking enough grease to sling onto the transmission tunnel and the muffler. That can't be good either, and I'm wondering if some degree of grease escape is to be expected, or it's an indication that the front joint is on its way out.

I'd be curious to hear anyone's thoughts on the subject!

88264911-C2B0-4975-A026-79730DBD882F.jpg ADEF23DE-CF67-40C8-9D1F-FE2E8099267E.jpg 03325088-D1EB-4CBA-B7DE-A044D93CDEF3.jpg
 

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Premium Member
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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516 Posts
I had exact same issues and just replaced the whole shaft. Much easier and peace of mind. Do a search on this issue and see some other people's responses.
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
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801 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I had exact same issues and just replaced the whole shaft. Much easier and peace of mind. Do a search on this issue and see some other people's responses.
Yeah, I considered that, but the center bearing itself is so cheap by comparison that I had to give it a shot first - though that decision was made before I saw grease slinging out of the front u-joint boot (so I'll have to look at that carefully to figure out what's going on there).

Here's what I did with the center bearing:

77D87A14-5499-451F-B082-9D1DB861223F.jpg EB0D61D5-14F9-473D-8B4B-EDA6D5645D18.jpg
 

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Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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131 Posts
The bearing is designed to keep both parts of the driveshaft solid to reduce harmonic vibration as the vehicle accelerates. I’m not sure if what you’ve done is going to work the way you want. By filling it with gasket material you’re limiting flex.

Also, replacing the center support bearing without replacing the entire shaft is a difficult task because reassembly is complex.

I’ve posted the complete details on how to replace the entire rear shaft in thread a few years ago.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
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801 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The bearing is designed to keep both parts of the driveshaft solid to reduce harmonic vibration as the vehicle accelerates. I’m not sure if what you’ve done is going to work the way you want. By filling it with gasket material you’re limiting flex.

Also, replacing the center support bearing without replacing the entire shaft is a difficult task because reassembly is complex.

I’ve posted the complete details on how to replace the entire rear shaft in thread a few years ago.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
My driveshaft work was interrupted by a trip to Denver for Club Volleyball Nationals - and the fact that the rear E14 bolts were so tight I didn't feel comfortable applying the needed torque with an 11mm 6 point socket (so I ordered E series sockets), but I'll get back to it on Monday. I plan on checking the condition of the front CV and rear spider; if it turns out they're both bad, I would have been better off just doing the route you suggest. If not, though, then I don't mind the assembly.

What I did was test articulation of the gasket before I filled the cavities with RTV: it flexes on all axes exactly as much after as before. I think this will stop it from shredding itself too quickly; this rubber surround strikes me as inadequately sized, and made of a slightly brittle (prone to elements) rubber. I think encasing it will work.

Far too many components on this RRS destroy themselves too quickly. Too much bad engineering/poor quality, but I'm holding onto it as long as I can because it's still cosmetically nearly perfect and the engine is solid as a rock to this point...so as I need to replace or service things, I'm trying to improve them as much as I can (like poly bushings for the sway bars and control arms).

Thanks for your input!
 
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