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Discussion Starter #1
2009 supercharged, looks like the locking motor is ontop of the diff. Service procedure says to basically just remove the motor with no other instruction. I've search a little with mixed results. Can you take that thing off without dropping the diff? I'm getting "trans fault reduced traction" and occasional HDC Brake Suspension errors. I haven't plugged into diagnostic yet but I'm going to assume this is the issue given the locking motor is no longer making it's trademark mechanical actuation noise on start/shutdown.

Any info would be greatly appreciated.

thanks guys
 

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Sounds like you already know a lot. I can't help on how to service but I got this same fault and it did end up being the rear diff motor being bad.
 

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I'm unsure if how close a 2003 would be, but I did a seal kit on the rear diff and the whole thing had to come down.
 

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There is no need to drop the diff on a 2009 to remove the actuator assembly. When you lift the back of the Rover, do so by lifting the body so the suspension can stay on the ground. This will give you more room.

The actuator assembly mounts sideways at the top of the diff and is held in with 4 bolt pointing downward. The rear bolt on the left can be a pain in the back side. Once you have the bolts out, disconnect the harness. On the face of the assembly there is an extrusion for the actual motor shaft. I stick a small square piece of wood about 4" long , think square dowel, under the extrusion and gently tap upwards with a hammer. The actuator assembly will break free from the diff with a bit of patience. The only thing holding it in place is the sealant. Once out place a clean rag over the hole in the diff so no dirt gets in.

Install is much easier. It's rather like seating a water pump. Make sure all of the old sealant is removed without getting any in the diff. Put your new sealant on sparingly and insert the assembly.

I've done two. It's bit fiddly working under there if you have FFS... Fat Finger Syndrome, but is not too tedious.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info, will give it a go in the next couple of days. I'm actually having a bit of trouble sourcing the motor from a reputable state side vendor. The current plan is to pull the motor, dismantle, clean, bench test and if it looks good refit for now. I can hear it not working on start up which triggers errors, key off then back on again it actuates fault free. I'm hoping it's just dirty inside or some corrosion at the electrics. Will keep you guys posted and take some pictures.
 

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how did you go about dropping it if you don't mind me asking? Pull all the shafts out, unbolt?

I realise that Toad already mentioned a better way, but the rear subframe can be completely removed by disconnecting the driveshaft, brake lines, electrics, air lines, and undoing the four large body bolts. It's pretty easy to do on a 2 post lift with a couple transmission jacks. It took maybe 2.5 hours to come completely down.
 

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Just adding on "A" way, not necessarily the easiest, best, or correct way.
 

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The actuator assembly mounts sideways at the top of the diff and is held in with 4 bolt pointing downward. The rear bolt on the left can be a pain in the back side. Once you have the bolts out, disconnect the harness. On the face of the assembly there is an extrusion for the actual motor shaft.
Like others on this forum that have an issue with the read diff locking motor, I have a full-sized supercharged 2008. Question on the procedure - should I remove only the actuator motor (green highlight in the picture) or should I remove the the gearing part (encapsulated in the entire outline in green) that has the actuator motor attached. Then once removed remove the motor and install a new one to the gearing part. Screenshot 2018-08-14 17.12.42.png
 

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You can remove the motor and bench test it. If it tests fine remove the "gearing" and see if it is binding. I remove the entire assembly so I can check both at once.
 

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Thanks that's very helpful because I wasn't sure if both the motor and the gearing can be removed as a single unit without dropping the axle. It also seems that LR sells the motor separate from the gearing housing and aftermarket vendors sell with both pieces together - probably a reman.

About an hour ago, I disconnected the harness and sprayed contact cleaner on the plug and connector and the "trans fault reduced traction" that I was getting for the past 10 starts is now gone. While it be nice to think this is a permanent fix, it's probably not.
 

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How about a) checking the associated fuse then b) disconnecting the cable, cleaning/checking the contacts? Male and female. Reconnecting and ensuring that is not the issue, prior to removal of the motor?
 

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Thanks that's very helpful because I wasn't sure if both the motor and the gearing can be removed as a single unit without dropping the axle. It also seems that LR sells the motor separate from the gearing housing and aftermarket vendors sell with both pieces together - probably a reman.

About an hour ago, I disconnected the harness and sprayed contact cleaner on the plug and connector and the "trans fault reduced traction" that I was getting for the past 10 starts is now gone. While it be nice to think this is a permanent fix, it's probably not.
So cleaning the connector fixed the problem for about a 90 days. I decided to replace the unit. Using midget wrenches, I was able to take the bolts off in a matter of minutes. However, I was not able to remove the unit from the top of the differential due to lack of clearance on my 2008. I followed the instructions that said to jack it up so the suspension stays on the ground. After fiddling with it for about an hour, I decided to reattach it and bring it to the shop. There seemed to be a raised section of half an inch or so on top of the differential toward the rear that made it impossible to pull the unit over it.
 

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last year I drilled a small pilot hole into the back of the lock motor housing and injected some lubricant. Squeaking and faults went away.

However, now into cooler days and at work (with people in the truck) I was getting the fault again. Also after driving it for about an hour, then restart - locking motor was jamming or had jammed. By turning off all electrical accessories - full battery voltage it would move again.

Went back to my pilot hole a few days ago, and just unloaded with some spray "super lubricant". Hasn't faulted since. Will keep you posted. It's easy to hear the motor cycle with key-on
 
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