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If you own a L405 or L494, You probably have a scratched up veneers on the center console. It’s inevitable. I bought a prior leased L494 not long ago. Mechanically and structurally it’s sound however the person who leased it definitely allowed it to get scratched up a lot outside and in. For a while now I’ve been trying to decide if it was beneficial to just cover them up or refinish them or just deal with it (unlikely for me). But with a day off work, I pulled the trigger to refinish and decided to give a guide on how to do so if you anyone else is inclined or Interested in painting or if someone just wanted to know how to get the components off.

This took me 6 hours however some of that will be decreased if you use the exact products I use, as with any compounding, polishing and refinishing, finding the right compound and polish mixture and speed for the surface takes some trial and error to obtain the best results. Furthermore you’re likely not documenting this as I was. Let’s be honest, if your considering doing this, you’re going to want to do it right.

Of note: This projects removal is specific to an L494 however the polishing is applicable to a L405.

Tools:
-T10
-T7
-5/16th socket or M8
-Dual action random orbital polisher
-Tweezers (recommended not paramount)

Consumables:
-Nitrile gloves
-Cold water source
-TSP (or equivalent degreaser)
-1500g sand paper
-2000g sand paper
-2500g sand paper
-3000g 3M Trizact sanding pad
-3M 05954 super duty rubbing compound
-3M 39061 perfect-It 1 polish (light wood)
-3M 05996 perfect-it 2 polish (dark woods or piano black finish)
-Red buffing DA pad (compounding)
-Microfiber finishing DA pad (polishing)
-Plush microfiber cloth (recommend drying platinum series)

This is no different than polishing paint, however first you have to get the component out of the car.

PARTS REMOVAL:

Step 1:

Remove the Dash and set it aside


Step 2:

Remove the brushed aluminum rails on both sides of the center console. They need to be removed pulling to the rear of the car and upwards; there is a retaining clip under the rear seat brushed aluminum components, this needs to be pulled outboard. Once removed this will expose four M8 or 5/16ths nuts retaining the HVAC (two on either side), you will be able to remove the HVAC so extract the four M8. The wooden facade component of the HVAC is held on with clips and with little ease will pop off. Additionally removing the rails will expose six M8 retaining screws, three on either side of the console. Remove those as well. (This is where the tweezer comes in handy to prevent them from falling into the abyss.)

284001

284002


Step 3:

Under the center console (leather portion) there are four T10 screws, two on either side. You’ll need to lift this piece out to remove the large center portion of the console. However BE AWARE on the passenger side (US) there is a electrical harness that provides power to the ambient light LEDs. Do not just pull it out, carefully remove it.

284003


Step 4:

Now it is time to remove the largest piece of the wooden center console. Remove by lifting up SLIGHTLY! There are 2 electrical harness’s at the rear of the component for gear box that need to be disconnected. Pull them out and than you can maneuver the console component to the rear and upward negotiating around the shifter with out removing it.

284004

Step 5:

The cup cover should be the last component needed to remove, there are three shiny silver T7 screws on either side. Pick a side and remove them carefully allowing you to extract the component. Removing all six screws is unnecessary for this task.

Step 6:

The HVAC Trim has the disc guide on it and can be removed with two T7 screws on the rear. The large component had the gear selector and shift guide pieces that you should remove prior to. The gear selector has eight T10 screws retaining it. The gear shift guide is slightly tricky, but actually slips out rolling off two pivot points.

REFINISHING:

Step 1: Cleaning

Now all the component should be out, at this point I cleaned all the components and set everything aside, put on my nitrile gloves than cleaned the mass of dust, dirt and sticky grim out from the console, it was pretty bad. This includes degreasing all the wooden surfaces to prep them for sanding and buffing, insert TSP in a spray bottle, if you’ve gotten this far, I find it silly to say “don’t spray the electrical components with anything” but lest I fail someone, don’t do it. There will still be a aluminum ring around the beverage holder, leaving it on did not affect it in anyway during the rest of this refinish.

Step 2: Sanding

Pending the depth of your scratches or imperfections you could jumpy right to wet sanding with the trizact pad, I only the other rand and to wet sand with 2000g for a while to lift them. The gloss coat is quite deep so don’t worry about burning through, but I wouldn’t start off with anything less than 1500g.
If you’ve never refinished or sanded (doubtful your doing this job) but wet sand in a cross hatching pattern not a rounding or circular form. I personally reciprocate sanding 6 to 12 than 9 to 3, than tilt and sand 4 to 10 than 7 to 2 (clock), and repeat as applicable this provides the absolute best leveling. Periodically, I allowed the parts to dry and identify any scratches that haven’t been lifted yet. I’m all instances, once leveled bump up to the next grit level, if you started at 1500g go to 2000g, if you started at 2500g go to trizact, all sanding finished with the trizact pad, sanding the same way I did previously.

284006

284007



Step 3: Compounding

Use the DA red compounding pad made by maguires to buff the remaining surface. I recommend 3M products, they cost more but this is because they are sulfate and silicon free. Cheap buffing compounds and polishes sometimes have fillers in them, this leads you to believe the surface has been polished flat providing and excellent reflection when however, the surface heights have been slighted lowered but the low points (scratches) have been filled. You don’t want them filled, filling isn’t permanent you want the surface level. 3M 05954 super duty rubbing compound worked best for this application, the DA random orbital set at 2500 RPMs proved best and the compound was put on very heavily; there are a lot of cracks and edges on these components constantly removing product, don’t let it get to dry. Do not use a regular orbital polisher, this will make the clear coat burn from friction.

Step 4: Compound Cleaning and checks

After 10-15 mins of compounding, I rinsed the parts with cold water. Specifically cold to aid in hardening the clear coat. A warm clear coat will be soft and subject to minor swirls when touching, drying is next. This rinse will remove the bulk of the product left behind and help you get it out of the cracks and joints. When drying, if able air dry, you’ll still need a microfiber cloth to clean off any excess residue. Check surface with a light source, there should be a slight haze but all sanding marks will be gone, if you need to repeat, do it.

Step 5: Polishing

Polishing is not dissimilar to compounding, I used a microfiber finishing pad made by grouts for this, the polish that performed the best was 3M 05996 perfect-it 2 polish (dark woods or piano black finish) as my wood is dark however you could use 3M 39061 perfect-It 1 polish (light wood) if you have lighter veneers. DA RPMs and generous coatings apply similarly as well as all aforementioned steps from the compounding section.

Step 6: Treatment

Now your veneers should have there original luster back, I treated them with a light coat of furniture wax to protect them, allowing it to haze and dry slightly before wiping away.

REASSEMBLY:

Pretty straightforward, put everything back how it came out. Ha, honestly if you just did this, you can figure that part out. Don’t forget any screws or electrical connections and be careful with your newly restored parts!
  1. 284008
 

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@Hoover.a

You sir... are a bad-azz! What talent and patience you have my friend... fantastic post and pics along the way. You are a joy to have on this forum and we really appreciate you taking your effort and time in posting this.

My wood finish is still really good thankfully. But should it need a refinish/dressing I/m going to save this post on my hard drive so I always have it. Thanks again Hoover.a
 

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The results look great. Thanks for sharing.
I bought a protective film that is cut for our interiors just to avoid this. It is like a screen protector for your phone. I was worried about scratching mine up as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Before and after:
284009

:/

284010

kinda forgot to take a lot of before pics, it was genuinely far worse than these two small sections in the larger areas like the beverage cover.

284011

side by side of trizact and polished, at one point I almost considered leaving the matte 3Kg sand ha, figured it would prevent the sun reflection going forward in this task was going to have.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The results look great. Thanks for sharing.
I bought a protective film that is cut for our interiors just to avoid this. It is like a screen protector for your phone. I was worried about scratching mine up as well.
Prevention is the far easier solution haha
 

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@Hoover.a - Fantastic write up. Thank you.

@Gpplutta - do have a link for the scratch guard stuff you purchased? Definitely interested in that.
Here is the link.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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If you own a L405 or L494, You probably have a scratched up veneers on the center console. It’s inevitable. I bought a prior leased L494 not long ago. Mechanically and structurally it’s sound however the person who leased it definitely allowed it to get scratched up a lot outside and in. For a while now I’ve been trying to decide if it was beneficial to just cover them up or refinish them or just deal with it (unlikely for me). But with a day off work, I pulled the trigger to refinish and decided to give a guide on how to do so if you anyone else is inclined or Interested in painting or if someone just wanted to know how to get the components off.

This took me 6 hours however some of that will be decreased if you use the exact products I use, as with any compounding, polishing and refinishing, finding the right compound and polish mixture and speed for the surface takes some trial and error to obtain the best results. Furthermore you’re likely not documenting this as I was. Let’s be honest, if your considering doing this, you’re going to want to do it right.

Of note: This projects removal is specific to an L494 however the polishing is applicable to a L405.

Tools:
-T10
-T7
-5/16th socket or M8
-Dual action random orbital polisher
-Tweezers (recommended not paramount)

Consumables:
-Nitrile gloves
-Cold water source
-TSP (or equivalent degreaser)
-1500g sand paper
-2000g sand paper
-2500g sand paper
-3000g 3M Trizact sanding pad
-3M 05954 super duty rubbing compound
-3M 39061 perfect-It 1 polish (light wood)
-3M 05996 perfect-it 2 polish (dark woods or piano black finish)
-Red buffing DA pad (compounding)
-Microfiber finishing DA pad (polishing)
-Plush microfiber cloth (recommend drying platinum series)

This is no different than polishing paint, however first you have to get the component out of the car.

PARTS REMOVAL:

Step 1:

Remove the Dash and set it aside


Step 2:

Remove the brushed aluminum rails on both sides of the center console. They need to be removed pulling to the rear of the car and upwards; there is a retaining clip under the rear seat brushed aluminum components, this needs to be pulled outboard. Once removed this will expose four M8 or 5/16ths nuts retaining the HVAC (two on either side), you will be able to remove the HVAC so extract the four M8. The wooden facade component of the HVAC is held on with clips and with little ease will pop off. Additionally removing the rails will expose six M8 retaining screws, three on either side of the console. Remove those as well. (This is where the tweezer comes in handy to prevent them from falling into the abyss.)

View attachment 284001
View attachment 284002

Step 3:

Under the center console (leather portion) there are four T10 screws, two on either side. You’ll need to lift this piece out to remove the large center portion of the console. However BE AWARE on the passenger side (US) there is a electrical harness that provides power to the ambient light LEDs. Do not just pull it out, carefully remove it.

View attachment 284003

Step 4:

Now it is time to remove the largest piece of the wooden center console. Remove by lifting up SLIGHTLY! There are 2 electrical harness’s at the rear of the component for gear box that need to be disconnected. Pull them out and than you can maneuver the console component to the rear and upward negotiating around the shifter with out removing it.

View attachment 284004
Step 5:

The cup cover should be the last component needed to remove, there are three shiny silver T7 screws on either side. Pick a side and remove them carefully allowing you to extract the component. Removing all six screws is unnecessary for this task.

Step 6:

The HVAC Trim has the disc guide on it and can be removed with two T7 screws on the rear. The large component had the gear selector and shift guide pieces that you should remove prior to. The gear selector has eight T10 screws retaining it. The gear shift guide is slightly tricky, but actually slips out rolling off two pivot points.

REFINISHING:

Step 1: Cleaning

Now all the component should be out, at this point I cleaned all the components and set everything aside, put on my nitrile gloves than cleaned the mass of dust, dirt and sticky grim out from the console, it was pretty bad. This includes degreasing all the wooden surfaces to prep them for sanding and buffing, insert TSP in a spray bottle, if you’ve gotten this far, I find it silly to say “don’t spray the electrical components with anything” but lest I fail someone, don’t do it. There will still be a aluminum ring around the beverage holder, leaving it on did not affect it in anyway during the rest of this refinish.

Step 2: Sanding

Pending the depth of your scratches or imperfections you could jumpy right to wet sanding with the trizact pad, I only the other rand and to wet sand with 2000g for a while to lift them. The gloss coat is quite deep so don’t worry about burning through, but I wouldn’t start off with anything less than 1500g.
If you’ve never refinished or sanded (doubtful your doing this job) but wet sand in a cross hatching pattern not a rounding or circular form. I personally reciprocate sanding 6 to 12 than 9 to 3, than tilt and sand 4 to 10 than 7 to 2 (clock), and repeat as applicable this provides the absolute best leveling. Periodically, I allowed the parts to dry and identify any scratches that haven’t been lifted yet. I’m all instances, once leveled bump up to the next grit level, if you started at 1500g go to 2000g, if you started at 2500g go to trizact, all sanding finished with the trizact pad, sanding the same way I did previously.

View attachment 284006
View attachment 284007


Step 3: Compounding

Use the DA red compounding pad made by maguires to buff the remaining surface. I recommend 3M products, they cost more but this is because they are sulfate and silicon free. Cheap buffing compounds and polishes sometimes have fillers in them, this leads you to believe the surface has been polished flat providing and excellent reflection when however, the surface heights have been slighted lowered but the low points (scratches) have been filled. You don’t want them filled, filling isn’t permanent you want the surface level. 3M 05954 super duty rubbing compound worked best for this application, the DA random orbital set at 2500 RPMs proved best and the compound was put on very heavily; there are a lot of cracks and edges on these components constantly removing product, don’t let it get to dry. Do not use a regular orbital polisher, this will make the clear coat burn from friction.

Step 4: Compound Cleaning and checks

After 10-15 mins of compounding, I rinsed the parts with cold water. Specifically cold to aid in hardening the clear coat. A warm clear coat will be soft and subject to minor swirls when touching, drying is next. This rinse will remove the bulk of the product left behind and help you get it out of the cracks and joints. When drying, if able air dry, you’ll still need a microfiber cloth to clean off any excess residue. Check surface with a light source, there should be a slight haze but all sanding marks will be gone, if you need to repeat, do it.

Step 5: Polishing

Polishing is not dissimilar to compounding, I used a microfiber finishing pad made by grouts for this, the polish that performed the best was 3M 05996 perfect-it 2 polish (dark woods or piano black finish) as my wood is dark however you could use 3M 39061 perfect-It 1 polish (light wood) if you have lighter veneers. DA RPMs and generous coatings apply similarly as well as all aforementioned steps from the compounding section.

Step 6: Treatment

Now your veneers should have there original luster back, I treated them with a light coat of furniture wax to protect them, allowing it to haze and dry slightly before wiping away.

REASSEMBLY:

Pretty straightforward, put everything back how it came out. Ha, honestly if you just did this, you can figure that part out. Don’t forget any screws or electrical connections and be careful with your newly restored parts!
  1. View attachment 284008
Excellent, thank you for taking the time to document and share..(y)
 
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