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1993 Range Rover Vogue SE 3.9L V8
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I am currently restoring my 1993 Range Rover Vogue SE and I just got it started after it being stored for over 14 years. After running the engine and letting it warm up I noticed that the engine was overheating and the cooling system was going way past the recommended 85-90 degrees mark. After having a feel of the rubber tubing, I also noticed that coolant didn't seem to reach the radiator to cool, nor was it going back to the engine. It seemed to just boil the remaining coolant that was left in the engine block and thew it up in the overflow tank. What is the reason for this? Could it be a faulty Thermostat, a blockage somewhere in the cooling system or a broken water pump?

Thanks in advance.

Liam.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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35 Posts
Hello,

I am currently restoring my 1993 Range Rover Vogue SE and I just got it started after it being stored for over 14 years. After running the engine and letting it warm up I noticed that the engine was overheating and the cooling system was going way past the recommended 85-90 degrees mark. After having a feel of the rubber tubing, I also noticed that coolant didn't seem to reach the radiator to cool, nor was it going back to the engine. It seemed to just boil the remaining coolant that was left in the engine block and thew it up in the overflow tank. What is the reason for this? Could it be a faulty Thermostat, a blockage somewhere in the cooling system or a broken water pump?

Thanks in advance.

Liam.
Could be a combination of all or any one of them but I’d be looking at the thermostat first. Take care removing the housing bolts as it’s easy to shear them, be very gentle.
 

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1993 Range Rover Vogue SE 3.9L V8
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Discussion Starter #3
Could be a combination of all or any one of them but I’d be looking at the thermostat first. Take care removing the housing bolts as it’s easy to shear them, be very gentle.
Thank you, yes I think I’ll look at the thermostat first. If it is faulty, is it best to purchase an OEM part or will an ‘aftermarket’ park work just fine?
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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35 Posts
Thank you, yes I think I’ll look at the thermostat first. If it is faulty, is it best to purchase an OEM part or will an ‘aftermarket’ park work just fine?
An aftermarket one should be fine as long as it’s not too cheap and cheerful. Bearmach are a fairly decent supplier of stuff like that but you might be able to get something local at least to try and fix the problem.
 

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1989 Range Rover Classic
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190 Posts
Thank you, yes I think I’ll look at the thermostat first. If it is faulty, is it best to purchase an OEM part or will an ‘aftermarket’ park work just fine?
Go OEM. A thermostat is cheap no matter what, and it isn't worth risking a several thousand dollar motor to save $10 on a thermostat. Other issues though, assuming the coolant level shows full, you may have a big air pocket, and these motors can be tricky to bleed properly. Did you flush the coolant? If it's been sitting for 14 years you REALLY REALLY should flush all the fluids if you haven't already, otherwise you're just begging for disaster. In terms of the thermostat, make sure the one you get has a small bleed hole in it, should be a hole in the flange about 2-3mm in diameter that lets a bit of coolant flow through even when the thermostat is closed. This also lets trapped air out, and makes the system way easier to bleed. Rovers do not like being hot, so when testing/troubleshooting, try not to let it get too toasty before shutting it down.
 

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1993 Range Rover Vogue SE 3.9L V8
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Go OEM. A thermostat is cheap no matter what, and it isn't worth risking a several thousand dollar motor to save $10 on a thermostat. Other issues though, assuming the coolant level shows full, you may have a big air pocket, and these motors can be tricky to bleed properly. Did you flush the coolant? If it's been sitting for 14 years you REALLY REALLY should flush all the fluids if you haven't already, otherwise you're just begging for disaster. In terms of the thermostat, make sure the one you get has a small bleed hole in it, should be a hole in the flange about 2-3mm in diameter that lets a bit of coolant flow through even when the thermostat is closed. This also lets trapped air out, and makes the system way easier to bleed. Rovers do not like being hot, so when testing/troubleshooting, try not to let it get too toasty before shutting it down.
I have replaced all the fluids. Currently, my main worry is that coolant isn’t actually reaching the radiator at all. I’ll have a look at the thermostat and do a test by putting the thermostat in 88 degree water to see if it fully opens. The other thing I am going to check is the water pump. The butterfly inside of the pump my be worn, broken or just rusted away therefore the pump isn’t able to send coolant throughout the Engine and through the radiator for cooling. Do you know where the bleed valve for the cooling system is? I assume it’s somewhere on the top of the radiator.
 

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Hi ,
as above test thermostat to ensure it’s working, are you sure rad is not clogged? do you get a good flow through if you take bottom hose off and put a hosepipe in the top, if you have emptied the system fair chance you have air lock.
when filling up I would have the heater set to hot so the valve is open then fill up, I have in the past had to take a heater hose off and fill through the pipe to get rid of an air lock!
do you have the 2 steel heater pipes like in the picture (I don’t have the bleed mine is an earlier engine) anyway they run down the side of the plenum chamber on the left hand side of the engine viewing from front, there is a air bleed fitting in there the black bit that sticks up sorry not a very good picture...
water pump impeller is a possibility I suppose but I have never had an issue other than bearings.
also I would fill system via radiator first then top up expansion tank. image.jpg
 

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1993 Range Rover Vogue SE 3.9L V8
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Discussion Starter #9
Hi ,
as above test thermostat to ensure it’s working, are you sure rad is not clogged? do you get a good flow through if you take bottom hose off and put a hosepipe in the top, if you have emptied the system fair chance you have air lock.
when filling up I would have the heater set to hot so the valve is open then fill up, I have in the past had to take a heater hose off and fill through the pipe to get rid of an air lock!
do you have the 2 steel heater pipes like in the picture (I don’t have the bleed mine is an earlier engine) anyway they run down the side of the plenum chamber on the left hand side of the engine viewing from front, there is a air bleed fitting in there the black bit that sticks up sorry not a very good picture...
water pump impeller is a possibility I suppose but I have never had an issue other than bearings.
also I would fill system via radiator first then top up expansion tank. View attachment 286733
Thank you! I believe i may have a massive airlock. I’ll follow the steps to remove the airlock also having a look at the thermostat and checking to ensure that it is not seized. I’ll keep you updated.
 

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Hello,

I am currently restoring my 1993 Range Rover Vogue SE and I just got it started after it being stored for over 14 years. After running the engine and letting it warm up I noticed that the engine was overheating and the cooling system was going way past the recommended 85-90 degrees mark. After having a feel of the rubber tubing, I also noticed that coolant didn't seem to reach the radiator to cool, nor was it going back to the engine. It seemed to just boil the remaining coolant that was left in the engine block and thew it up in the overflow tank. What is the reason for this? Could it be a faulty Thermostat, a blockage somewhere in the cooling system or a broken water pump?

Thanks in advance.

Liam.
The thermostat could be closed/seized. If not, the pump would be the next place i'd check. Take off the radiator cap (plastic nut) and while the engine is running (carefully) squeeze the large hose and see if it chases any air out
 
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