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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All!
I want to contribute and receive advice as I go along my journey of restoring this beautiful car. I recently bought a range rover p38 4.0L and I love all her features, but there’s this one (maybe few problems haunting me from driving it.
I turned it on and plugged in my OBD 2 scanner and got these codes:
P1373
P1371
P0300
P0306
P0301
P1316
P1314
P1313

This are all misfire codes seemed to be caused by the ignition coils so I assuming let, had replaced and cleaned all connections to and the ignition coils themselves. I had also replaced the spark plugs and wires, hoping this would be the end of the problem, but the codes still showed. If anyone could help me at all I would appreciate any advice I can get because parts can become pretty pricy. Thank you again!
 

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Looks like you've got one faulty coil. You don't mention what year it is but if pre-2000 you've got 4 individual dual ended coils and one feeds cylinders 1 and 6 (the 0301 and 0306 codes), if post 2000, the coils are the same but in blocks each containing 2 dual ended coils but again, one of them feeds cylinders 1 and 6. The other codes are for multiple misfires but you've also got some timing codes. That would suggest damaged pins that the crank position sensor takes it's signal from. I assume you cleared the codes? Some might be historic so clearing them first before checking again would be a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Looks like you've got one faulty coil. You don't mention what year it is but if pre-2000 you've got 4 individual dual ended coils and one feeds cylinders 1 and 6 (the 0301 and 0306 codes), if post 2000, the coils are the same but in blocks each containing 2 dual ended coils but again, one of them feeds cylinders 1 and 6. The other codes are for multiple misfires but you've also got some timing codes. That would suggest damaged pins that the crank position sensor takes it's signal from. I assume you cleared the codes? Some might be historic so clearing them first before checking again would be a good idea.
Hey Richard! I see where you’re coming from with that, and I’ll probably clear the codes but as I said, I had already replaced all the coils with new ones.

To mention, this is a 1996 Range Rover with a 4.0L v8. Any other recommendations? Thank you!
 

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A 96 will have the inspection plate over the bottom of the flywheel, drop that off, turn the engine over slowly and look at the tags that the crank position sensor sits between. There will be one gap which is how the ECU knows when the engine is at top dead centre, so expect to see that but you are looking for bent or missing tags. If bent they can usually be carefully straightened out. If you look up you will be able to see the tip of the crank position sensor which should be between the tags. A 4.6 has a spacer behind the CPS, a 4.0 litre doesn't so if someone has replaced it and put the spacer in when it doesn't need it, the tip will be level with the top of the tags and not between them.
 
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