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2008 Range Rover L322
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38 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've searched pretty thoroughly but don't see much chatter about which brands people like/dislike.

Also read up on the all aluminum radiator option as well. I was forced to purchase a Nissens when the Behr product was NLA for one of my other cars and so far it has been fine. The brand seems to have great ratings as well.

If one was not going OEM route, which brands seem to be good quality? Another question is does anyone replace the seemingly dinky hose clamps with better options? I was thinking German SS....
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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343 Posts
It's not a matter of like/dislike, a product has to be up for the job in fitment and durability. If Nissens is good and the price is right search no longer for all-alu rads unless you have special demands.
As for the clamps, I am happy with the CT-clamps. Once you have the proper tools it works fast and accurate, better than the worm-types you have to re-adjust now and then because of teperature influences and the risk putting them too tight.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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771 Posts
Innovation, on your profile you have year 2002-05, i.e. L322, but put model as p38. Which is it ?

As for hose clamps, stick with the factory ones, spring type, rather than jubilee clip, tighten them to much and your not getting equal pressure all round.
 

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2008 Range Rover L322
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38 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Innovation, on your profile you have year 2002-05, i.e. L322, but put model as p38. Which is it ?

As for hose clamps, stick with the factory ones, spring type, rather than jubilee clip, tighten them to much and your not getting equal pressure all round.
Corrected profile to 1995-2002. It is a P38.
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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4,215 Posts
I've just put a new Nissens brand radiator in my '01 P38. They seem to have a pretty good name over here, so went with that.

It dropped right in nicely, and so far no problems!
 

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I've just put a new Nissens brand radiator in my '01 P38. They seem to have a pretty good name over here, so went with that.

It dropped right in nicely, and so far no problems!
Had one in mine for a couple of years now and no problem (mind you running Evans Waterless coolant with no pressure helps so.....)
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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1,295 Posts
...(mind you running Evans Waterless coolant with no pressure helps so.....)
Can you share a bit more info about your experience with the Waterless Coolant- feel free to start a new thread if you like!
The concept of running the cooling system at atmospheric pressure appeals greatly to me, especially given my car's propensity to point out (politely) the smallest weep. Knocking off that 20ish PSI from the system can only be a benefit. The only downside being the cost!
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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161 Posts
I haven't had a good experience with Nissens, 1 cracked in a completely unstressed place longitudinally on the top hose fitting and the other didn't fit tight on the bottom plastic, like the wrong seal had been inserted. I tightened the tabs manually which invalidated the warranty but eventually it failed. Supplier sent me a new one which I've had a year and it's ok except for the very rubbery not well fitting o ring that is fitted to the manual purge valve underneath, have had to modify after it became impossible to tighten as it was so out of shape and stretchy.

Thanks for the link to the Bosch, I am up for one of those.

M
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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1,423 Posts
My original factory radiator lasted over 10 years until the plastic blew at the top. I then fitted an all aluminium rad made by Allisport and that has just started to leak around a weld. Stay with OEM if you want reliability I would say. I also use silicon hoses where possible and constant tension clamps. They don't slacken off with time as others do.
 

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Can you share a bit more info about your experience with the Waterless Coolant- feel free to start a new thread if you like!
The concept of running the cooling system at atmospheric pressure appeals greatly to me, especially given my car's propensity to point out (politely) the smallest weep. Knocking off that 20ish PSI from the system can only be a benefit. The only downside being the cost!
Sorry for delay in getting back to this thread. The reason I changed over to Evans waterless coolant was purely to eliminate the pressure aspect of the cooling system. Long story short, I rebuilt the engine about 5 years ago, top hatting it at the same time. After about 4-5 months I started loosing coolant and I was getting emulsification of the oil. Coolant was leaking down past 1 sleeve into the sump. I had the engine out 3-4 times over the next 12 months taking it back and getting the one liner replaced/resealed. Each time after a few months it would start leaking again. It would lose about half a pint every trip and the mulsification would build up in the left head (never the right - go figure...) I spent a lot of time trying to understand the problem and determined through having the sump off straight after a good run that it only leaked when there was above 5-6psi in the cooling system. Release the pressure it would stop leaking straight away. I didn't know about Evans coolant at the time and it was watching that episode of Wheeler Dealers some months later where I saw it first. I rang the UK Evans office and spoke to their technical bloke plus I spoke to a company who was using it in their 4.6 V8 110s used to move heavy loads around in the summer months. They couldn't speak highly enough of the product. What I was trying to do was avoid having to find another block and start again rebuilding a new engine costing £2k. I saw the specific problem of one leaking liner as a small problem which with some thinking could be overcome. Evans Coolant I believed was the answer...

As for changing over to it, it just takes time and patience. I wanted virtually no pressure so I had to ensure I got every last possible bit of water out of the coolant system. When you drain the coolant system the block and the heater matrix etc you still have about 1.5-2 litres of coolant in situ. You have to use the Evans flush to keep filling the system, run it then drain it taking more of the water with it when you empty it. After 3 flushes I had the water % to 0.1. (I sent several samples after each flush off to Evans who would analyse it and email me back the results.) At first i bought several lots of flush but I realised you could boil the flush after each use to evaporate off the water. The Evans Coolant/flush boils at 180 degrees C so the used flush would start to boil just over a 100 degrees releasing the water vapour but after 10 minutes it would just simmer right past 160 degrees c. If I was doing it again I would just buy 10 litres of flush and keep boiling it after each use.. SAFETY - The Evans Coolant/Flush is flammable under high heat situations. I used a gas stove outside in the middle of the garden with a 4 inch gap from the top of the coolant to the top of the pan. Don't do this in the house!

The results - no pressure in the system and the liner doesn't leak.

Things to note - The Evans Coolant expands when hot. If you fill to the normal level and run it with the expansion cap screwed fully down you will get water pump pressure in the system of about 3-4psi. I fill it to about 20mm lower and the cap just screwed on half a turn so any pressure. Once it's hot the coolant level is at the normal level. It's quite strange being able to remove the cap when the engine is up to temp and the engine running......The coolant will find every weep hole it can so everything needs checking/tightening but when you stop it leaking when cold it won't leak when hot as there isn't the added factor of pressure to deal with.

This product will not rectify the problem of slipped liners but for my specific problem it has been very successful. I've been running it like this for the past year and the car runs no different than when using normal coolant. Some people says it runs hotter but I've not noticed this and through summer it would usually stay around 90-92 degrees c only get to 100-103 degrees c after a run and you stop moving. (The summer temp was 30 degrees c.)

Changing over cost about £250 but compared to another new engine build it was well worth it. Would I have changed to the product if I didn't have my specific problems, probably not has having 15psi pressure in a coolant system isn't usually a problem but if coolant pressure is causing you a problem then go for it.....
 
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