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Discussion Starter #1
Well, maybe more ice than snow.

May have a last minute unplanned trip to visit the girlfriends parents.. may encounter some snow.

Had some new wheels and Toyo Proxes STII 285/40-22 tires installed.

Curious if I'm going to have a rough time with these tires in the snow... Any other users?
 

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If you're truly driving on ice and hockey-rink packed snow, and not just soft compacted snow on pavement, nothing short of studded snow tires will keep you from much-lengthened stopping distances, wheel slippage on start-off or corners, and some ruined underwear if you're not careful or get surprised driving into a shady turn. Even non-studded snow tires will slip if you don't have proper respect for the conditions.

While Toyo calls the Proxes S/T II "all season," most all-season tires are truly a jack of all trades, master of none. The key is the temperatures you'll be driving in. Even all-seasons lose their tread block pliability below about 45 degrees F, and if it gets *really* cold, like 20's or lower, you're driving on rocks on anything other than true snow tires, which means less traction from the biting edges, even on dry pavement.

That said, a healthy dose of caution and you should be fine. Maybe air down ~10psi or so too if you get into the freshies, just watch for potholes since you're technically on "low profile" tires for such a heavy vehicle.
 

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I've spent my winters in Colorado for the last 5 years. I find anything less than a dedicated snow tire to be sketch. Sure some people say you're fine if you just drive slowly carefully, but thats the point, unpredictable things happen and when you need them most the tires won't be able to respond. If you can afford to get some, and plan on going into the snow more than once, there are some really great snow tire options for our trucks.
 

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Mj - welcome.

Your Toyo's are perfect for SoCal and the ice versus snow argument is well detailed with respect to tyres on this forum-great advice from DR !

The temp's this week seem pretty mild so far this winter in North America (Aunt just flew out to Toronto, CAN from Perth, AU this morning).

You should get to the girly and her folks easily in snow mode if needed, otherwise use low range and caution if encountering any snow drifts ?

Cheerio,


Vinniman.
'88 Hi-line
Perth, W.A
 

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I lived in SoCal for several years and dedicated snows are a waste of money unless you're driving up to the Sierras regularly or to Big Bear in an El Nino year - better to have an extra set of snows on winter wheels to throw on in the garage on Thursday night before making the drive. Even then, it's a lot warmer even in a Sierra cement blizzard than it is virtually any time in the Rockies, and the mountain roads hold a lot of heat all winter, so unless you actually end up moving to Mammoth or Tahoe, all-seasons plus caution and electronics should be enough for occasional trips.

Living in Colorado, I agree with @t0pgear as far as the mountain states go. Dedicated snows are the only answer here - just put my Nokian Hakkapeliitta R2 SUV's on for the winter - about a month late, but it's been a stupid-warm fall. Best winter tire I've ever had, bar none.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the replies guys!

Don't see it worth throwing snow tires on my stock 20" wheels and swapping the rims/tires over for half a day of travel.. i'll stick with the Toyos and be cautious!!
 
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