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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Driving the car yesterday I pushed the throttle hard against the floor when overtaking a lorry going up a hill and noticed that there was no kickdown. Might be a sign of advancing years but I honestly can't remember if I've ever had kickdown on the RR. There doesn't seem to be any resistance at the point where you would usually expect the kickdown 'switch' to engage so I'm guessing that it isn't there.

Can anyone confirm whether it should kickdown or not?
 

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If you press the pedal a bit and the torque converter lockup was engaged (slight drop in revs in 3rd/4th) it should open the lockup and it the rpms should go up (a bit).
If you press the pedal further it should definitly change down, it will rev up to the limit of 5500 rpms if you push it hard enough (my max. rpm was 5000, overtaking with about 100km/h, this means 2nd gear)

I'm by no means an expert on this, but could this be caused by a broken Throttle Position Sensor, not working perfectly at the end of the pedal travel or being completely broken?

RAVE: "The throttle angle is also supplied to the gearbox ECM, the loss of this signal will result in poor gear change quality and loss of kickdown"
(search for "kickdown" in "Workshop Manual 1", this is the first match)


Sigi
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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298 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cheers Sigi - I'll check it out. No probs with the gear changes, all smooth as silk, just no kickdown. Oh well - more expense! :roll:
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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4,635 Posts
Hi Wiggy:

I had a problem with kickdown for ages - from about Dec 04 when I got the car to about 3 months ago when it all suddenly started to work properly. It was a problem I had been hunting down during this time. Like you overtaking was a bit of a fine art. Car refused to kickdown.

It finally fixed itself when I took it for a service at my local independent. Not sure what they did but after that it has worked so well I havn't needed to switch 'Sport' or manually use position '3' on the shifter. I do know they didn't like my idea of using race oils in the diff and went back to an 'EP' or possibly 'EP90' type. Also they did do a autobox filter change. Also used Texaco branded stuff. That's all I know.

Now at around half throttle there is a change and full throttle gives you the kitchen sink.

I think it was down to older sensors not being efficient AND also not using the correct fluids.

In hindsight, maybe I should have had a good session on T4 to check the sensors were working correctly. That way at least I could blame incorrect diff/transfer/autobox fluid grades... maybe? :?
 

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I had a similar problem when I first got my truck.
My LR mechanic reset the "Adaptive Values."
It's like your truck memorizes how you drive, whether aggresively or not, etc..
But after my mechanic reset the values, he said that I needed to be really aggresive with it at first, kinda punch'n it, getting the RPMS up around 5K, etc.. for the first 10-20 miles, getting the truck to restore the new values.
Ever since, I have terrific kick down when I need it.
Well that's my $0.02, hope it's worth something.
 

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You could be right...
But when someone has a problem with a Range Rover you tend to think something is broken :D

As far as I know the adaptive values can be reset on GEMS models by disconnecting the battery for some time (at least mine ran really bad for the first minute after the last battery disconnect).
The usual caveats like radio codes, resetting the windows, etc. apply.
If I'm wrong you'll have to reset it with Rovacom/Faultmate/Testbook


Sigi
 
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