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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all - so my EAS pump failed again about a week after rebuilding it. Now it won't build any pressure at all. :-|

Unfortunately, I can't wait on eBay for a replacement pump, and may have a genius (harebrained?) idea to at least temporarily get me back up to std. height over the weekend:

Get a length of hose with the same male connector as the output on the pump. On the opposite end have a schrader valve. Maybe an on/off valve in between, just because I can.

Connect the male end to the air pump hose (the blue one) and pump up the tank with a shop compressor. Allow it to raise up and then pull the EAS timer.



Would that work? Do I need to have the car running to pump it up (I assume the tank has it's own valve in the block that needs to pop open? Don't want to damage anything...)?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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It'll work, just don't put too much pressure into the tank. 100psi max to be on the safe side. Or, instead of using the workshop compressor, use one of those little electric tyre pumps and connect it to the electrical feed to the original pump then the pressure switch will be involved so it'll work like the original one (not sure for how long though.....). A pump is a pump after all.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Brilliant, thank you for the quick reply Gilbertd! Off to the hardware store then!
Do I need to have the car on? Been staring at the valve block diagram on hardrange and can't figure out if the air is routed passed a valve or not.
 

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if I remember correctly, you can connect via one of the dryer pipes (not sure which one), and pressurise the tank via the NRV. This way you don't even need the EAS system powered.

but using Gilbert's method will also energise the diaphragm valve, and sort out the exhaust challenge when filling via the compressor inlet. !!
 

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Greetings kingsly,

This I happen to know as I had a similar problem. What I found out is that on the tank the front plug is 1/2" NPT (or close enough to work and seal). So what I did was went to the local auto store (o'reilly auto parts) and found that they had a brass (no corrosion) bushing that went from 1/2" NPT to 1/4" NPT. They also had a 1/4" NPT to Schrader valve. I drained the tank using RSW solutions EAS unlock (although there are other ways to do this safely). Removed the plug from the tank. Then using sealant at the joints I assembled the pieces. Now I can use my big (a relative term, mine is only a 33 gallon) air compressor to fill the tank. If I had been thinking I would have used a length of air hose with a male 1/4" NPT on one end and female 1/4" NPT on the other so that I could fill it under the hood instead of crawling on the ground. This setup has proven to be quite useful on more than a few occasions as I am still fighting leaks and burned up my compressor again.
BTW most of the roadside type tire compressors are not man enough to fill the EAS system from empty. (ask me how I know).

Good luck,
John.
 

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if I remember correctly, you can connect via one of the dryer pipes (not sure which one), and pressurise the tank via the NRV. This way you don't even need the EAS system powered.

but using Gilbert's method will also energise the diaphragm valve, and sort out the exhaust challenge when filling via the compressor inlet. !!
I use the top pipe on the dryer, that way you bypass the diaphragm valve and don't need to have the system powered when filling the tank. And it's real easy to reach.
 

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like this
EAS Bypass 1.jpg


EAS Bypass 3.jpg

EAS Bypass 4.jpg

remove the fuse
EAS Bypass 6.jpg
 
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