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I just bought a used RRS 2019 TD6 HSE. It has the factory hitch/tow package installed. We have a 23' Airstream Flying Cloud. The RRS can tow 7,700 lbs. so there's no issue with weight. But I've been doing some research and I'm reading about things like weight distribution and control. I'm new to trailers and towing and I'm having a hard time figuring this out.

What do I need to be aware of when using the RRS 2019 to tow a trailer? Is there anything I need to do to prepare the RRS to tow the Airstream? Thanks.
 

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I have a 2016 td6 and am considering buying a flying cloud. Based on my research the only thing required to purchase is a trailer brake controller. I am looking at the Curt Echo wireless brake controller because you don’t have to drill holes, cut wires etc. You can control the sensitivity and emergency braking from your phone. Your tire pressures need to be set for heavy load and extended mirrors would be nice.


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Thanks @Bamablue! I just purchased another brake controller with wires etc., but I will return it and get the Curt Echo. That looks so much easier. I've been doing more research this morning and have come to a similar conclusion, that the RRS should be able to pull the 23FB without a problem. The 23FB has a hitch weight of 467 lbs, and the RRS has a max hitch weight of 772 lbs.
 

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Okay, now I'm confused again. I posted a similar thread over on the Air Forums (Airstream community), and some are saying that I do, in fact, need a weight-distribution hitch and sway control to properly tow an AS—while others disagree. Here are a few excerpts:

Your rover does not have a weight dist hitch. The hitch is a separate piece you would purchase aftermarket. It is not necessary with air suspension vehicles since the car self levels and corrects for the load. I am running a 2010 SC sport towing a 23fb, I run a frame mount curt receiver and a Hayes sway master. Its plug n play. she tows great.
Then a reply:

Air suspension only levels the tow vehicle. A weight distribution hitch is needed to shift weight from the rear axle to the front axle of the tow vehicle and the rear axle of the trailer. If the front and rear axles are not balanced, the front will not steer and the rear will be overloaded. The tow vehicle will be unstable. This is why you must weigh the axles to determine the load carried by each set. A CAT scale at a truck stop is the place to get those weights.
I responded:

According to Land Rover's own documentation, "The use of weight distribution hitches is not recommended. Using weight distribution hitches can potentially cause serious damage to the vehicle."
I also asked why LR would prohibit a WD hitch if they are necessary to tow safely. He said:

Most probably it's a combo reason.
1st the receiver itself is not designed to transfer the needed leverage.
2nd the unibody design/construction does not allow the mounting of a receiver that would transfer the needed weight.
I don't know who to believe or what to do about this. Do I need a WD hitch? If I get one, would it void my LR warranty if something happened? Do I need a sway control device? If so, which one?
 

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I have a 2016 td6 and am considering buying a flying cloud. Based on my research the only thing required to purchase is a trailer brake controller. I am looking at the Curt Echo wireless brake controller because you don’t have to drill holes, cut wires etc. You can control the sensitivity and emergency braking from your phone. Your tire pressures need to be set for heavy load and extended mirrors would be nice.


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The wiring for the brake controller is already in the car in the area above the brake pedal. With the correct adapter, it is plug and play for the RRS of your year. See the sticky above.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The wiring for the brake controller is already in the car in the area above the brake pedal. With the correct adapter, it is plug and play for the RRS of your year. See the sticky above.
Thanks! I did order the P3 and the 3035-P adapter based on that thread. I thought the wireless option might be easier still, but some of the reviews make me nervous because they talk about drop-outs of the connection etc. I think I'd be more comfortable with a wired setup.

Re: my original question, I'm still confused. Here is another reply on the Air Forums. This guy seems really knowledgable, and it makes me nervous not to use WD after reading this.

First off Robert is correct. Air suspension does not redistribute the weight shifted off the front axle by the torque generated by tongue weight, so it is false to advise that air suspension is an adequate substitution for Weight Distribution (WD).

Second, without WD and depending on the vehicle and the tongue weight, steering response and handling stability degrades. WD when properly applied will help with both for all vehicles specifically designed and marketed for towing and for most but not all other vehicles. If you are interested in a more complete description, send me a private message.

Third, RR engineers and marketing have designed and marketed your particular vehicle for light to modest towing. Thus the structural components are a bit too flexible for hauling heavy loads. Adding substantial WD tension to a vehicle with these design features while perfectly fine for all normal conditions, can cause issues in dynamic situations. Severe accidents are one such case and WD will increase tendency for increased structural damage in a collision. Another is negotiating severe uneven terrain, which can also cause structural damage or creasing of some structural sheet components.

To address this RR marketing decided not to market this vehicle to medium and heavy towing and instead drastically reduced their liability by advising against WD thus relegating the vehicle to light towing where use of WD has only very slight improvements to stability. They further addressed lack of WD by adding active sway control to their suspension programming. I'll explain the relationship between WD and sway control in a bit.

So, does this mean you should not use WD? No. This vehicle can competently tow a 6000 pound trailer, and with modest WD will be comfortable, competent and stable. You should limit tension to 650-750 lbs at most as a good compromise so 750 lb bars (refers to tongue weight not tension) will work best. You should also release tension to cross a deep drainage swale or ground that is significantly uneven side to side.

Although The RR has active sway control to reduce and stop it once it starts, passive sway control raises the stability speeds and prevents it from happening. They complement each other. the vehicle is small, short and light, so in your case the WD hitch should have good sway control properties, I like the Reese Straight-Line or similar. Avoid the Recurve as it's sway control is not linear so it confuses the active sway control programming. Sway damping increases with WD tension on all hitches though adjustment is independent on some so a system like the straight line or other hitches with independent adjustable sway dampers will be best for you.
 

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If was gonna tow a Airstream with my RR I would add the sway control. Watch some videos on how they work. Well worth the cost. Even look around for some used ones. I bought a 600.00 setup off a guy for 125.00
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If was gonna tow a Airstream with my RR I would add the sway control. Watch some videos on how they work. Well worth the cost. Even look around for some used ones. I bought a 600.00 setup off a guy for 125.00
Thanks. What model/brand of sway control did you choose?
 

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Check out posts from lcd32bit. He posted for awhile a few years ago about his setup and travels all over the US pulling an airstream. He used a BlueOx sway bar setup with 1000lb bars and said it towed great everywhere... Colorado mountains included.

Hope this helps.
 

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I tow something a little larger.. If you want the best anti sway and weight distribution hitch it's the ProPride 3P. It's a pivot point projection hitch not a friction sway hitch so it effectively eliminates sway.
287738
 

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I just bought a used RRS 2019 TD6 HSE. It has the factory hitch/tow package installed. We have a 23' Airstream Flying Cloud. The RRS can tow 7,700 lbs. so there's no issue with weight. But I've been doing some research and I'm reading about things like weight distribution and control. I'm new to trailers and towing and I'm having a hard time figuring this out.

What do I need to be aware of when using the RRS 2019 to tow a trailer? Is there anything I need to do to prepare the RRS to tow the Airstream? Thanks.
OP to answer your question directly. You NEED a brake controller, WD hitch, and towing mirrors. Personally I use a Prodigy P3 brake controller, ProPride 3P hitch, and the Milenco Aero 3 mirrors.
 

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Does anybody see any evidence of WD or sway control on the rover / airstream setup used in the 2500 mile round trip from Germany to Sweden?
I know there are people that swear that you need WD with sway control. Land Rover says you don't need either one. The suspension levels the vehicle and the vehicle senses trailer sway and stabilizes by applying brakes to the vehicle.
Another question would be how many of you tried to pull an Airstream or camper and realized that it was not safe and added sway control and or WD to your setup?
 

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Does anybody see any evidence of WD or sway control on the rover / airstream setup used in the 2500 mile round trip from Germany to Sweden?
I know there are people that swear that you need WD with sway control. Land Rover says you don't need either one. The suspension levels the vehicle and the vehicle senses trailer sway and stabilizes by applying brakes to the vehicle.
Another question would be how many of you tried to pull an Airstream or camper and realized that it was not safe and added sway control and or WD to your setup?
Air suspension has nothing to do with weigh distribution. When you hookup to something with heavy tongue weight most travel trailers it's going to take weight off of the front axle of the vehicle. This is not a pleasant sensation and will greatly hinder the vehicles ability to maneuver generally. The WD hitch restores weight back onto the front axle by taking it off the rear axle and distributing it to the front axle of the tow vehicle and also the trailer axle. Having driven my rig with my WD jacks too low I would never tow a travel trailer without a WD hitch.

Also the electronic sway control is not a replacement for mechanical sway control. The electronic sway system is a reactive system that is there to stop unintended trailer sway from some form of abrupt maneuver. The mechanical sway control is a proactive system that keeps the rig straight and stable. I guess you could theoretically drive with just the electronic sway control but it would be a very exhausting experience since you will be making constant corrections to counter the trailer moving around.

Most Euro manufacturers don' recommend WD or Sway control hitch and have a low tongue weight cap due to EU regulations and European trailers. Most of the time they tow at a significantly lower speed than we do in the states so they don't need higher tongue or sway control.

Hope that helps.
 

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Do you agree that it appears there is no WD incorporated on the setup Land Rover and Airstream used in the article? Why would the front end of the Land Rover not be pointed up in the air?


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Do you agree that it appears there is no WD incorporated on the setup Land Rover and Airstream used in the article? Why would the front end of the Land Rover not be pointed up in the air?


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I think you're mistaking the tow vehicle being level with proper weight being distributed to the front axle.

The trailer in that article is a European model Airstream, they have their axles located in a different part of the trailer and are also dimensional narrower in order to only produce ~150kg of tongue weight. A US model Airstream is wider, the axles are closer to the rear of the trailer, and the tongue weight is substantially higher.

I can tell you for a fact (CAT scale verified) that my RR sport connected to my trailer without the WD jacks engaged makes the front axle substantially lighter even though the RR is level front to rear.
 

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I have never noticed the wheels being more centered on the trailer. There is a drastic difference in tongue weight from Europe to US. Very interesting. Thanks. I guess as a general rule they have smaller vehicles and narrower roads.


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