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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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My 2000 LHD P38 has steel brake lines running front to back on the right (US passenger) side of the vehicle. There is a spot aft of the suspension air tank that forms a convenient "pocket" for snow, salt and slush to collect. Over time the brake lines did rust through, causing loss of pressure in both braking circuits. This in turn caused complete loss of my ability to stop the vehicle, save for the parking brake. I was very fortunate that this happened in my driveway. If it were to happen on the highway I would have been considerably less fortunate.

The brake lines are NLA. I invested in a flaring tool, some M10x1 brake line fittings/nuts (P38 uses ISO/DIN bubble flare type) and a roll of 4.75mm copper-nickel alloy brake line. These lines are easy to bend without crushing them, they don't rust and they will outlast the rest of the truck. Porsche used them from the factory, back when they built their cars to last.
 

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The other place to check is the short loops at the rear, they are also well known for rusting through. Over the years there's been numerous arguments for and against an annual safety check. In most US States, they seem to only be interested in emissions and ignore everything else, whereas in most other countries an annual MoT check (as it is known in the UK) would have spotted the rusting pipes long before they started to leak.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #3
I live in a state that requires annual vehicle inspections. It's a revenue collection measure for the state that does not affect vehicle safety in any way, shape or form.
 

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Over here rusted brake pipes would be an immediate fail, as would things like worn steering and suspension joints, screen washers and wipers, seatbelts, blown lightbulbs, in fact, anything that is safety related for both the occupants of the car and others outside of it. With a fail you can't use it, simple as that, until you have fixed the problems and had it retested.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Turns out I had this exact failure on a 2002 4.6 P38. It was parked on grass, leaked out and left a stain of dead yellow grass. Lost most brake pressure, so fixed the line from the crack on rear pass side and renewed it with good line over to driver side in the rear.

95k on rig, and it has not seen many winters in a long time.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I had a similar bad experience with my 2000 MY a few years back. The brake pipe that crosses over behind the fuel tank burst due to corrosion.
Fortunately at the time it was in my drive and I had just fitted some new pads. I was pressing down hard on the pedal to seat the new pads and the pipe suddenly burst. Went right down to the floor.

I replaced the pipes with cupronickel after that. I also fitted stainless steel hoses while I was at it.

The pipes above the fuel tank can't easily be inspected. It would not be picked up on the UK MOT test.
 
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