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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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215 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Doing some hw on things that will keep the air compressor healthy. I've read about the exhaust valve silencer/filter. I've got one on order so I can drill a hole and install it to prevent any future clogging.

But, I've also read about compressor piston ring and piston o-ring. Are those maintenance items to replace? How often should they be replaced? Or is this more of a rebuild procedure for whenever those parts actually go bad and we lose compression from the piston?

I've also read some info about the compressor dryer and replacing the desiccant in the dryer. But, I can't find any how-to's or details on the actual procedure. Keeping the compressed air dry sounds pretty important for the health of the compressor, so replacing the desiccant is something I'd like to tackle.

Your input is always appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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72 Posts
I had the same thoughts as yourself. I purchased a kit on eBay and replaced the filter, desiccant and piston seal on my 07 L322. The procedure was pretty simple and it works much the same as before but with new bits. Take care not to damage the aluminium piston or cylinder bore when removing the piston

 

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640 Posts
Is there a way to service the compressor to address the issue where air does not release when commanded? I'm thinking of the same issue that causes the "high pressure" suspension (soft) fault.
 

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Premium Member
2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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277 Posts
Is there a way to service the compressor to address the issue where air does not release when commanded? I'm thinking of the same issue that causes the "high pressure" suspension (soft) fault.
BTW did the same rebuild this last weekend. Wasnt hard EXCEPT getting the rocker seal off the piston which i chewed up (did deburr) but honestly it doesn't matter too much because the seals do the work. Make sure you seal the piston chamber good or you'll get "lifting slowly" errors. Also I threw out the 1/4 and 3/8 orings and used the more chemical resistant ones I had on hand.

The compressor feeds a valve block attached to the compressor before going to the reservoir. Then there are front and rear valve blocks.

I'm not certain but id suspect your primary at the compressor valve block is slow or gummed up causing you not to be able to release pressure. It should be rebuildable and is easier to replace.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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127 Posts
If you replace a compressor that had been pumping in excessively moist air, there could be water accumulated in your system, most likely your tank. When you put the new compressor in, no desiccant in the world is going to be enough to dry out the water that may have accumulated in the tank. I think it would be very good practice to remove your air tank and ensure it is completely dry.
 
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