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After reading several posts here about peoples' rigs blowing oil all over the place after a cold start, I gather it's from any water in the oil separator freezing up and causing blockage in the system leading to extreme crankcase pressures building up. Not wanting this to happen to me, I was going to do a little preventative maintenance on my '05. I read Storey Wilson's article on the PCV system hose renewal (actually had the breather hoses that run over the intake replaced when I had the valley pan seal done a couple months ago), and so was wondering what else I need to do. I did buy the oil return hose that goes on the bottom of the funnel-shaped separator thinking that is the place where all of the oil will leak from, correct?

Also, I should ask; for those of you who had this happen, what turned out to be the point of exit of the oil? Was it that return hose? Curious because if it's just a return hose, what is a sump's worth of oil doing in there??

I'm probably buggering this question all to Hell, but I guess I'm somewhat confused on components of this system since there is the funnel shaped separator, an actual PCV valve and then the contraption at the back of the intake...right? :?
 

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Well, one thing you can do is move to Houston :)

When I replaced all my PCV valve/hoses a couple of weeksn ago I wondered the same thing. Since it very rarely gets below freezing here in Houston, I doubt it will ever be much of a problem for me. Likewise, looking at Storey's videos and comments by others, I don't think the oil separator return hose is where the leak occurs. That hose apparently is in bad shape on a lot of these BMWs (until changed) and they don't look like they're even solid. They look like any oil passing through the separator would leak on the exhaust and you'd smell it.

Except in the case of the freezing hoses not allowing flow to the sump (oil and/or air) causing a big blowby when the clog let's loose - like a dam. Maybe?

It also occurred to me that maybe that 'ding' - 37dF - message is related to the PCV valve issue. Maybe that's when the blanket kicks on. ? I've heard it twice this year :)
 

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After reading several posts here about peoples' rigs blowing oil all over the place after a cold start, I gather it's from any water in the oil separator freezing up and causing blockage in the system leading to extreme crankcase pressures building up. Not wanting this to happen to me, I was going to do a little preventative maintenance on my '05. I read Storey Wilson's article on the PCV system hose renewal (actually had the breather hoses that run over the intake replaced when I had the valley pan seal done a couple months ago), and so was wondering what else I need to do. I did buy the oil return hose that goes on the bottom of the funnel-shaped separator thinking that is the place where all of the oil will leak from, correct?

Also, I should ask; for those of you who had this happen, what turned out to be the point of exit of the oil? Was it that return hose? Curious because if it's just a return hose, what is a sump's worth of oil doing in there??

I'm probably buggering this question all to Hell, but I guess I'm somewhat confused on components of this system since there is the funnel shaped separator, an actual PCV valve and then the contraption at the back of the intake...right? :?
If I knew then what I know now I would have replaced the rear intake cover(pcv), ALL associated hoses coming off of it (4), and the oil sep. valve before I even started up the truck in 30 degree or less weather. As LEBoyd mentioned, the sunbelt area doesnt make these things vulnerable to this design flaw. Up north you are pretty much guaranteed that this will happen eventually. It happened to my 04 about a month ago when it was around 25 degrees out. I am not sure of the point of exit of the spill. I was thinking it was the lower hose you mentioned but I am not sure. It probably dumped around half a quart or so but luckily it happened 50 yards from my driveway and I made it home and shut it off. On the highway I would imagine it would dump real quick and fry the motor. I have this weekend reserved for replacing the rear intake cover with hoses,and the fuel pump myself in heated garage. I already did the oil sep valve and its lower hose. Jim
 

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One thing I would recommend is removing the solid Oil Line that connect to the Sump and the Cyclone Oil Separator. It splits off into two lines a Thine one and a Thicker one. It clogs up REAL BAD remove it and clean out.
 

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One thing I would recommend is removing the solid Oil Line that connect to the Sump and the Cyclone Oil Separator. It splits off into two lines a Thine one and a Thicker one. It clogs up REAL BAD remove it and clean out.
"removing"? I'm sure you meant "replacing".
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, one thing you can do is move to Houston :)

When I replaced all my PCV valve/hoses a couple of weeksn ago I wondered the same thing. Since it very rarely gets below freezing here in Houston, I doubt it will ever be much of a problem for me. Likewise, looking at Storey's videos and comments by others, I don't think the oil separator return hose is where the leak occurs. That hose apparently is in bad shape on a lot of these BMWs (until changed) and they don't look like they're even solid. They look like any oil passing through the separator would leak on the exhaust and you'd smell it.

Except in the case of the freezing hoses not allowing flow to the sump (oil and/or air) causing a big blowby when the clog let's loose - like a dam. Maybe?

It also occurred to me that maybe that 'ding' - 37dF - message is related to the PCV valve issue. Maybe that's when the blanket kicks on. ? I've heard it twice this year :)
Haha, I would love to move somewhere warmer, but on my one and only visit to Texas (I drove my old P38), as soon as I broke across the TX border from Arkansas, a massive Tejas-sized dually was on my a$$ relentlessly and that was enough to make my mind up about that place--or at least driving there! But yeah, good question about the 37 degree chime. Always wondered why LR picked 37 degrees. Don't the roads usually freeze up at 32 degrees?? Whatever....silly limeys.

Well, with this winter's weather mix being so goofy, I guess I ought to just order all of the other bits and get it out of the way before another cold snap...

Thanks, L4FLIROP, about the tip to flush the metal lines. Will remember to do that. :thumb:
 

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Haha, I would love to move somewhere warmer, but on my one and only visit to Texas (I drove my old P38), as soon as I broke across the TX border from Arkansas, a massive Tejas-sized dually was on my a$$ relentlessly and that was enough to make my mind up about that place--or at least driving there! But yeah, good question about the 37 degree chime. Always wondered why LR picked 37 degrees. Don't the roads usually freeze up at 32 degrees?? Whatever....silly limeys.
I just grin-and-bear those duallys - even I get better fuel mileage then they do :)

Obviously, the condensation in the PCV valve hoses can't freeze at 37dF, but my thought is that that's when the heater kicks on. So, if it's getting colder there's little chance of a freeze up. It's an interesting design to say the least - especially since these engines were designed where it freezes often!

Myabe a better design would have been to make a few adjustments for the "cold weather" package. Add a second deep cycle battery and then change the heater (and maybe even an engine heater) to kick on at 33dF and off at say 37dF. A relay could disconnect the second battery when the vehicle is not running, which would keep the system from draining the battery used for starting (kicking back on when the engine is running to charge the second battery). And, of course, as with diesels, you'd have a plug-in for AC connection when available (which would also keep both batteries charged). [I know, I know! More things to go wrong... :) ]
 

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IIRC the owners manual says thats a warning to let you know that icy conditions could exist on your journey. Kind of useless up north but with an occasional cold snap down south it could save a life or two giving inept drivers a warning. Jim
 

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IIRC the owners manual says thats a warning to let you know that icy conditions could exist on your journey. Kind of useless up north but with an occasional cold snap down south it could save a life or two giving inept drivers a warning. Jim
I like that one! LOL! I learned to drive in Germany, so I've got some experience. Down here I think we've had two or three days of ice or snow in the 22 years I've been here. In Dallas, however, it was several days a year.
 
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