RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Right now my 07 RRS is at 102k miles on the dash. I've put only 2k of those miles on myself and have already flushed and replaced every fluid in the vehicle, replaced the rear driveshaft, and installed larger tires in anticipation of a large road trip next year. Next up I'm going to be chasing down the cause of my current intermittent steering vibrations (tires re-balanced, had exact same issue with previous brand new OEM sized tires).


Anyway, next September I'm going to be driving from Wisconsin -> Colorado -> Utah -> Wisconsin, which is right around 2,700 miles if you did a straight shot. I'll be doing mountain passes in Colorado for a couple days before going to Moab in UT for more off road fun.

My concern is that I'm already at 102k on what appears to be original suspension, and have no records of previous maintenance for any EAS components, CarFax only reports alignments/tire balancing etc. I really, REALLY don't want to get stranded out on a mountain somewhere stuck on my bump stops. Right now the suspension is a little bouncy, but it rises/lowers without issue, compressor doesn't make any funny noises, no leaks, etc..


Would you, in a similar situation, preemptively start replacing components if they've not yet failed?



I don't necessarily want to get rid of EAS, I definitely see the benefits and it seems to be a robust system when functioning properly as mine is now. But, I'd be lying to say that the thought of a coil conversion system with a 1.75" lift is kind of tempting considering I plan on owning this to well over 200k, at which point the value is going to through the floor anyway.
 

·
Premium Member
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
516 Posts
I would not convert. The EAS is a large part of the terrain response system that makes these trucks so versatile. As for preventive maintenance, yes check the system but no reason to fix something that is not broken. I may be wrong but the only time you would go to bump stops on all 4 corners would be an ECU failure or failure of all valve blocks at the same time. You may end up on bump stops on one corner from a failed height sensor or air leak. Any other EAS issue would disable the system and "freeze" all corners where they are at the time of the issue. I was in the woods on wet mountain trails when my EAS blew a air line. It disables the system but the truck stayed at off road height and got me out just fine. I never really noticed any ill effects from the terrain response. I guess the 4x4 system on these trucks is still well engineered even if one of the systems is off-line.
If you do change out any parts be sure to give yourself a few days to drive and make sure there are no issues prior to your trip.
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Converting to coils is not going to my first option by any means, just doing my due diligence in researching it at this point :) From what I'd read on an LR3 forum was that coils wouldn't affect the terrain response system, which I believe is the same as ours? I still don't know exactly what the EAS provides in terms of off road performance or capability other than ground clearance, but I've read something about "cross axle" performance but I'm not sure what that has to do with air suspension vs aftermarket coilover performance (video here).

Good to know that it would "freeze" all corners if there was a non-leak related issue, that's reassuring. My biggest fear in this whole trip planning stage is the "worst case scenario" of dropping all the way down and being trapped on some rugged hill somewhere unable to get to a location where a tow is even possible!

I'm also planning on picking up a GAP tool here at some point so that diagnosing issues out on the trails is an option.



Second question: are there any spare suspension parts you would personally bring on a trip like this? If sensors are cheap and physically accessible out in the wilderness, it wouldn't be a bad idea to have them on board in case one does fail..
 

·
Premium Member
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
516 Posts
Thing with the conversion to coils is you are stuck with what you install. I enjoy the freedom of quickly changing to extreme off road when needed and back to street level. The coil would provide about 2" lift but with my 32" tires, Johnson rods and the GAP tool I can get up to a 5" lift or more.

As for the spare parts, I think the height sensors are corner specific so you would need to have all 4 in reserve. I guess you could have a a spare front and a spare rear strut/air bag and a spare compressor. I say your best preventive maintenance would be the GAP tool. On the old LRs you could fashion a part out of just about anything for a trail fix. These new ones have like 14 ECUs and you can't fix those on the trail but the GAP tool will help.
 

·
SUPER MODERATOR
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
4,459 Posts
I would definitely proactively replace the following parts:

1. EAS compressor - convert to the new AMK vs. the old original Hitachi. Get the software upgrade
2. Put on new ride height sensors at the same time as you do the compressor.
3. Get some underbody protection (front skid plate)...check ASFIR for items.
4. If your struts/shock towers are looking good and not leaking AT ALL, you'll be good.

I did a TON of offroading in Colorado, Utah, Arizona and my first set of struts lasted until 144K...but I did replace my first compressor right around 80K miles.

Have fun..take lots of pics.

Definitely get the GAP tool to be able to clear any codes on the trail in case you get the dreaded Red Triangle which drops you to your bump stops.

Good tires, good compressor to air up/down bit A/T tires, tire puncture repair kit, and all of the rest of the normal spares (extra coolant for example).
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I'll likely just end up with the GAP tool and hoping the EAS holds up.

Staying at a constant 2" lift (I saw a 1.75" lift option somewhere) wouldn't be the end of the world for me, drove around a lifted truck previously and I think the RR looks fantastic in it's raised mode. The Lr3 guys seems happy with the ride quality of their conversions, but as you said, I do like the ability to go up at the press of a button. I don't lower it ever as I haven't and likely won't ever have a need for it, so that's not a hold up for me at all.
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I'll probably be close to 135-140k by the time this trip rolls around, so that's kind of worrying. I can't find any leaks in the struts, but I suppose that doesn't mean they aren't there. Just with the compressor + sensors I'd be looking at $1500+ in just preventative stuff, $300 more than the coilover setup by itself. Add in the potential of needing new struts at the same time and I'll be well over $2500, and that doesn't account for air lines and various other gizmos.

Looks like if I continue down this path of keeping the EAS I'll be in it for quite a bit of $$$ before the trip...
 

·
Premium Member
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
1,157 Posts
If you're still on the old Hitachi compressor, there's a rebuild kit that'll spruce it up.
GAP for sure.
I'm someone who did opt for switching to coils, but that's because I had a series of coordinated failures that made it cost effective to switch. I'm not hearing any of that above so I'm in the don't switch to coils camp too.
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I'll have to source a good kit and see if it's something I can tackle myself!

I'm really just researching the coils in case I run into a complete system meltdown, I would prefer to keep it stock. But, if I find myself staring at a $3k+ bill out of the blue, coils might be the way to go given the mileage and relatively low value of the truck already.
 

·
Registered
2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
480 Posts
On my 05 LR3, they had to rebuild the compressor (Hitachi) after 20K miles (it was one of the very first sold in US and had a lot of stuff replaced early under warranty). The 08 RRS/SC and LR3s all had the newer EAS compressor -- never any issue. Sounds to me like the right solution would be to get the GAP tool (lots of uses) and the compressor repair kit and keep both in the tool bag while enjoying this trip.
 

·
SUPER MODERATOR
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
4,459 Posts
The costs are relative to the capabilities you're giving up. You bought the vehicle cheap already at 100k miles, so moving to a coil over may be more economical, but it's gutting one of the key features of the RRS.

However, it sounds like the economics are the driving decision here for you.

You may want to consider also that if you're going to sell the vehicle in the future, in my view, converting to coil over would lower the value of the vehicle...but up to you.
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I'll have to dig around and confirm, but my guess would be that I have the Hitachi compressor. Given the age I'm sure it couldn't hurt to give it a rebuild while it's still functioning properly!

I'll be ordering the GAP tool soon, I'm in need of a second key so the GAP tool could save me $150 for programming right off the bat.

I understand that the EAS is one of the key features, and I've read a lot of comments on older threads where people compare the coil conversion to "castrating" the RR, but other than comfort (subjective, some people on ExpeditionPortal say it's as comfortable, or MORE comfortable than their EAS) and the height adjustment, are there other performance benefits to the EAS?

As it is I put on approx 20k per year on my daily driver, perhaps a little less now that my e30 is able to be driven in the summer now. By the end of next year I'll likely be somewhere near 150-160k on the RR, so its value at that point is already going to be so low that I'm not sure having a recently revamped EAS is going to raise the value enough to perhaps warrant any massive repair bills should they pop up.

If I can make it work with the EAS I'd rather keep it, but it's nice knowing there are cost effective alternatives to fall back on!
 

·
Premium Member
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
1,157 Posts
I would say I was pretty fortunate to have been around 187k and on my 2nd compressor when the suspension faults started firing. I remained on the original Hitachi as the AMK wouldn't fit with my RS sliders. I was also on my original rear air struts and 2nd set of fronts, though I could not recall how long ago I'd replaced those. In my situation, I was looking at a new compressor, a blocked valve (didn't know which one was blocked) and likely new rear struts. My indy shop ballpark estimated keeping the EAS setup to be approaching $5k while switching to coils was half that. For me, $5k is a lot given the value/age of the RRS and I've switched to wheeling the D90 more often and I'd rather save my pennies readying the D90 for the Western National Land Rover Rally.

The RRS is my daily driver and I've put ~2500 miles on it. Comfort-wise, the ride is great. Handles a lil stiffer, in a good way. Haven't wheeled it yet, but it can't be bumpier than the D90. I opted for the 1.5"-2" kit and looks like it's in offroad height despite the extra weight from the sliders & front skid plate. Good thing is it still fits in the garage, but now I've got to be conscious of clearance issues parking in SF garages.

But again, I think for your situation, it's overkill.
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Great info, thanks! I'll have to do a little more research so I can better diagnose/inspect my suspension. I'm hoping to make it up north next week to do a shake down run of off road time to see how everything feels and holds up.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top