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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I have a 94 classic low miles LSE which I have spent a fair bit on getting really sorted.

I'm pre planning for winter.. Now we live in Surrey (countryside) and last year in the depths of the snow it coped well although quite often I have to park on a river slipway which (pardonning the pun) does get very slippery.

I'm planning on getting it serviced and having new leads etc fitted as these havent been done in the 18 months I've owned it.. but the main reason for the post is that i'm considering offroad wheel/tyre package for it.

My wife is swedish (cue the "this thread is worthless without pics" message I'm sure ) and she swears by winter tyres.. the daily commute for the car is about 2 miles in rural then urban environemnt then 8 miles on dual carriageway then 2 miles into central London (ish)..

so for this purpose, should I just stick with my normal RR tyres (which have a bias to road use but I was told were also not bad for mild offroading) or.. should I get some of those steel offroad wheels with offroad tyres or will they be too harsh for general on road use?

(I do appreciate that i can just fit the offroad wheels if weather turns but I live on an island and getting heavy stuff across is a bit of a pain so its likely I wouldnt fit them as and when)

In a quandry and open to ideas and suggestions of which wheels/tyres etc.

Thx in advance.
 

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Hi Craig, I've just recently gone down this path and spent hours doing all the navel-gazing, so here's my thoughts.

Firstly, ignore any advice to choose tyres based on the 'proportion' of time you spend on different surfaces. Just because you may do 95% of your driving on a dry highway doesn't mean you should fit slicks, for example. The real question is, 'how buggered are you when you've got the wrong tyres on?'

Mud tyres work fine on the highway. They make a bit more noise, wear a bit faster, use a bit more fuel and all sorts of other boring stuff, but unless you're The Stig they'll get you from A to B on tarmac just as well as highway tyres will. It's the tricky bits you need to worry about, and highway tyres won't get you to the end of your driveway if there's some serious mud in the way.

Personally I opted for full mud terrain tyres as I have small distances of very inconvenient mud to negotiate - but I only need to use them in the wet season. I have a trailer and a caravan which will soon take the same rims so I can actually make use of having separate summer and winter tyres, by using the 'off season' wheels on the trailers and switching them with the seasons. If you don't, then it may not be so practical to always have a spare set of tyres/wheels in the garage - in which case you'll be using the tyres all year round, so you might want to think about 'all-terrain' tyres instead which will probably do the trick most of the time. You can always carry some chains for when it gets really ugly.

Remember too that your average Swedish winter is probably a bit different to your average Surrey one... :mrgreen:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
all good and valid points, thanks very much for your time. I'll look into the options now!

much appreciated.
 

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Snow sticks to snow so you need a tyre with lots of small sipes (holes in the tread).
An AT tyre will work better in snow than a full MT tyre but I do agree with the question "how buggered are you when you have the wrong tyres on?"
 

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I have 2 sets of tyres on wheels. General Grabber AT2 and Cooper Discoverer M+S.
Both in 265.75x16.
Change over in October and Aprilish which takes about 1 hour, and can inspect various
bits of the car much better. As well as apply antiseize to various surfaces.

The GG AT2 may be marked with the mountain and snow crystal symbol, but compared
to the Cooper tyre it is cr4p in the snow.
The AT2 has taken me everywhere I have asked it so far with little fuss. From tractor tracks
in the noggie mountains, british greenlanes, and pyreneen mountain tracks.
 
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