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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone been out there in a P38? Planning on doing some off roading soon and I want to explore new areas.

I just dont have a winch(yet) and dont want to get too stuck. I do have big AT tires and a 2in lift.
 

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Bit cryptic?
Pacific North West?
Off Road Vehicle??
Elbe Czech Republic??? (Long drive from WA!)
How about being a bit specific about just where "Out there" is, since most P-38 owners have been "Out there" just possibly not your particular one?:cool:
 

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Without a real location nobody can recommend off roading in your area. Personally I can think of nothing more insipid that going to a "park" with a bunch of bikers, 4 wheelers and other 4x4s whipping down their zippers to see who has the loudest rig or who can go faster through a mud hole. The Cascades and Olympics offer countless trails to incredible views and a boxed lunch. There are countless historic sites that only an all wheeler can make it to. For instance every year I do the Naches trail in some form of Range Rover. My 98 Granite has been over easily half a dozen times. In 2015 we traversed the pass in a new 405 diesel just to see how it would handle real mud, stream crossings and the first snows. She did just as well as any P38 has.
 

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Thanks for the replies. And I do realize that I mistakenly didnt put a specific location but I couldnt seem to edit the post last night; and I was too tired to try to figure it out.:doh:

For those of you that havent figured it out, Iam talking about Washington state, USA.


Totally agree with you RRtoadhall, The Naches trail area is one of my favorites, and definitely my preferred "style & difficulty" for my fairly stock rig. I was just feeling like trying something new this spring/summer...But will definetly do the Naches again as well..

Unfortunately I dont come from a background of wheelin'... So I dont know anyone to show me where these hidden gems are. Do you or anyone possibly have any other recommendations of the same caliber as Naches?
 

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I would not take a p38 unless you already have a trashed body, and don’t care what happens, and if you don’t have a winch, you have no business at Elbe. Just watch YouTube videos on busy wild. Just my two cents.
 

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SERIOUSLY Kdo? Did you not read a group of us doing Naches and me driving the neighbour's newly plated 405? You don;t have to mess up a rig in order to go off road. Being a responsible off roader is about the technical ability to get from point A to point B, enjoying technical aspects of the rig you are driving and having fun while gaining experience. It is not going fast and loud risking damage. Your post is ill informed for folks wanting to off road and learning the limitations of their P38s, but does back up why I don;t go to Elbe "Park" due to the knuckle draggers that frequent that location.

Let folks have fun. He is looking for trails and experience, not to trash his rig... a winch is never required to explore a P38s abilities.
 

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Give me a break busy trail at Elbe is not naches, the rigs that go through it have lots of body damage, if the op wants to do something different Evans creek would be a safer bet. Never said the p38 is not cable, I own one.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yup, the p38 is very capable in near stock form with good tires. Ive done a lot of easier trails in the past and tested out its snow and ice capabilities this last winter. Which is now why, I feel like I want to see what she can really do.. See how far she will really go before getting stuck or turned around..

I certainly dont want to trash my rig, she is still very nice and presentable for a 99'. I dont mind the occasional scratches,and Ill also take a dent or two, as I have in the past; but Im not in any rush to add anything to the collection. :dance:

So thanks for the info ppl, please keep it coming. Iam also thinking about doing a Surprise Lake run near Carbonado,WA this year. Anyone have any experience there in a p38?
 

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I have found my P38 quite capable off road. I'd suggest you buy a tirfor in case you get into trouble. For all the mucking around and cost you don't really need a power winch, although I found my old classic went way faster up the hill to my house when I fitted it with a Warn. I did the Monkey Gum Fire Trail in my old classic (prior to fitting the winch and bar) which is a pretty chewed up steep climb at the end and had to get the tirfor out once to help climb a rock. Otherwise it went fine. The P38 goes better than the classic (except downhill as my classic was a manual so had better engine braking).

Its also not so fashionable anymore, but I am a big fan of chains on muddy roads. You would be surprised what you can get through with a set of chains including wet grass on hills. The old man and uncles used to drive on some very ordinary roads with regular old two wheel drive utes with chains if necessary so I guess I am showing off my hillbilly origins.

The best advice I have for off roading is the old land rover motto - as slow as possible, as fast as necessary. And if it gets too ugly, either reverse down the hill and go back or get the tirfor out, if you rely on momentum to get you up ugly bits it is just a matter of time until something breaks.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have found my P38 quite capable off road. I'd suggest you buy a tirfor in case you get into trouble. For all the mucking around and cost you don't really need a power winch, although I found my old classic went way faster up the hill to my house when I fitted it with a Warn. I did the Monkey Gum Fire Trail in my old classic (prior to fitting the winch and bar) which is a pretty chewed up steep climb at the end and had to get the tirfor out once to help climb a rock. Otherwise it went fine. The P38 goes better than the classic (except downhill as my classic was a manual so had better engine braking).

Its also not so fashionable anymore, but I am a big fan of chains on muddy roads. You would be surprised what you can get through with a set of chains including wet grass on hills. The old man and uncles used to drive on some very ordinary roads with regular old two wheel drive utes with chains if necessary so I guess I am showing off my hillbilly origins.

The best advice I have for off roading is the old land rover motto - as slow as possible, as fast as necessary. And if it gets too ugly, either reverse down the hill and go back or get the tirfor out, if you rely on momentum to get you up ugly bits it is just a matter of time until something breaks.

Great info.. I like the last bit about the "old land rover motto". Never heard that before..Thanks for sharing
 

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theres some old land rover "how to offroad" videos on youtube. The guy who delivers them is a classic, he wears white overalls and has this wondrous 60's presentation, including the motto.
 

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I find myself laughing into my coffee here this morning!
After spending a month or so a year in Oz and NZ for the last 25 years, and the last 3 years there full time.........And yes, have owned and used a "Trifor" several times...........I never knew they were called a "Trifor". Aussies and Kiwis always seem to pronounce it "Turfer", so I assumed it was something that had crossed over from the landscaping industry!.......Go figure!
They are indeed bloody brilliant, however, I have never seen one outside of a Commonwealth country?
Also, in 22 years of epic outback offroading in the 85 classic, I have only used the warn winch on the front twice......to pull out a Land Cruiser up a small cliff and a Montero that went into a 1m+ deep Bull dust hole and stopped dead. (I made the driver attach the cable:dance:)
So, a "Turfer" and a couple of good snatch straps would be all you would ever really need.
Oh, I also carried chains, and made 2 important climbs because of them (Important, because it was up and over or 500+km around)
Reading this thread, I am looking forward to getting the traveling show here up to the North West to try out some of these trails!
 

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Iam also thinking about doing a Surprise Lake run near Carbonado,WA this year. Anyone have any experience there in a p38?
Carbonado is a dream run, full of history and incredible views. I lead a run up through the snow line a few years ago. Take a break in town for coffee and enjoy the oldest longest operational school in Washington. From there take a look at the old coke ovens lining the street out of town. The fire roads and trails above the town are poorly maintained, but take you to incredible views of the area and sides of Mt Rainier most folks never get to see. Surprise lake? they have a Starbucks and paved roads.... not a real off road destination. Stick to exploring the the fire trails east of Surprise Lake OR head south to the remnants of old Melmont then head east up any trails from there. Either route will give you breath taking views of Rainier and you will have a ball getting there with occasional use of wading height and low range.
 

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Hiya Bolt - Good to hear from a fellow troglodyte in a world of diff locks, 33" tyres and heavy winches. Its a TIRFOR, not trifor, hence the pronunciation, and I am sure you could buy one in the USA. The other plus is that I see a lot of guys in 4WDs who look like they could stand a bit of exercise, although there is always the heart attack risk.
 

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While I'm on hobby horses, whatever happened to travelling light? I did a recent Simpson Desert trip in the Rangy with a hiking tent and trangia stove and had a good old time. Got talking to the bloke at Birdsville who runs the local repair shop and he said the biggest source of problems was twin cab utes with broken chassis. By the look of how some guys were loaded up, it's no wonder. Especially when you check the specs e.g. a typical land cruiser has a payload around 600 kg which gets burnt up pretty quick with people, fuel and food. You would get close to that with four people and extra fuel, let alone winches, bull bars, roof racks, fridges etc. It would be interesting to put a few vehicles over a weighbridge and see how they come up.

Also it's good to see some discussion of off roading. Anyone ever noticed that Toyota and Nissan websites are all about where people have taken their cars and Land Rover websites are all about repair jobs?
 

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HA!
That will teach me to jump on the forum before finishing said coffee! ........Also, without the readers on:oops:
Tirfor it is then.
I did find one online.....1300 bucks! Ouch. Should bring mine up next time I am down under.
It is old and battered, but works.
Simpson was the first trip we did in the 85......20 years ago. Epic drive. Ran light as possible but still a bit heavy with fuel and such. I hear you about the bloated "offroaders" today. Amazing what you cannot live without! Go light, and go fast!

I am taking notes here on TH's fave roads. Watch for a yellow P-38 with a couple of dogs this fall!
Cheers
 
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