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Discussion Starter #1
Upgrading/Replacing Stock Airbox
(Document reflects modifications to a 2005 Range Rover Westminster Edition for North America. This may be applicable to MY 2003-2005 Range Rovers [4.4L V8] as well.)

DISCLAIMER: I share this information based on my own personal experience for [your] educational purposes only. I do not advocate that you perform this modification. If you choose to do so, you do so at your own risk. I am not responsible or liable for any omissions, damages, and/or consequences as a result of this modification – implied/direct or consequential. In addition, I am not affiliated with “Chromeintakes” nor do I receive any [financial] benefit in recommending this vendor.

Context:
I wanted a performance “boost” usually associated with replacing restrictive air intakes with upgraded systems (e.g., K&N), together with upgraded exhaust components (header, cat-backs and mufflers) and associated ECU tuning. This narrative is based on my Stock Air box upgrade experience following on the postings from WAXB and HNM (thanks guys!).

My narrative is also slightly different in that I modified the lower half of the stock air box to “limit” hot air ingress from the engine bay. Think of this as the “McGyver” version of a fully machined heat shield.
K&N data suggests that this setup will increase HP and Torque (up to +12 HP). The Filter used is capable of pulling-in 883 CFM of air over a stock box 551 CFM rating. I cannot verify these numbers as I have more performance modifications planned before I go to the dyno machine (need a specialized dyno for 4x4s).

I found a few other reputable sites that claim HP/Torque increase with an aftermarket air intake setup for the 2003-2005 Range Rover with dyno sheets to demonstrate improvement gains (think Hamann, et al). So, I hope this modification parallels their documented benefits (but for much less $$$).

I hope to generate a discussion on how these steps might be improved. So, I welcome your comments (be nice) that improve upon the steps documented here.

Enjoy!


STEP 1: Order a Replacement Airtake System (suitable to your version/MY Range Rover).
In general, there are very few aftermarket offerings for a 2003-2005 Range Rover. After much search on Google and this forum, I went with Chromeintakes:
Vendor: Chromeintakes
Part: 2003-2005 Range Rover 4.4L (Upgraded) Kit
Price: $115 USD (shipping included)
Contact: Ron
+1-562-696-9488
M-F, 12 noon – 5 PM PST

Footnote: Ron wanted to try something new with my kit and fit a larger K&N filter. Working together on the phone, I took several measurements. This involved removing the stock air box. We concluded that the clearance from the front right metal frame/base to the top of the hood that there was about 16.5” (inches) of vertical clearance. He shipped my kit with K&N filter RE-0920 (larger than the ones used by WAXB and HNM) and with a Red Elbow (instead of Blue). In addition, I received a couple of metal brackets to secure the air filter and a third O-ring bracket (instead of two usually supplied).

[attachment=4:1v5iihi5]Air Intake.jpg[/attachment:1v5iihi5]

Here is a picture identifying the K&N Filter used ...

[attachment=3:1v5iihi5]IMG_2265.jpg[/attachment:1v5iihi5]


STEP 2: Remove the Stock Airbox.
I will NOT describe or narrate the steps here as I believe the process of removing the stock air box is self-evident. If you need help, please consult other forum threads on how to do this. Needless to say, use a 11mm socket to remove the lower half of the stock air box and have a flathead screwdriver to loosen the O-ring bracket connected to the top half of the stock air box.
Once you have removed all components, your engine bay should look similar to the photo below …

[attachment=2:1v5iihi5]Step 2.jpg[/attachment:1v5iihi5]

STEP 3: Create a Heat Shield
I wanted to limit the suction of hot air from the engine bay into the larger air filter. So, I needed to create a “heat shield.” I fashioned one by modifying the lower half of the stock air box and utilizing the stock air box brackets for support (see picture below).

[attachment=1:1v5iihi5]Step 3.jpg[/attachment:1v5iihi5]

Here is the lower half of the stock air box (for reference only):

[attachment=0:1v5iihi5]Step 3a.jpg[/attachment:1v5iihi5]



... Continued with Part 2: How To Upgrade/Replace Stock Airbox (4.4L V8)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Part 2: How To Upgrade/Replace Stock Airbox (4.4L V8)

We will attempt to use a modified portion of this stock air box to shield/limit hot air from being ingested. It is not fully capable of isolating the air filter from hot air inside the engine bay, but it is an improvement over nothing at all.

[attachment=4:23f34j0z]Step 3b.jpg[/attachment:23f34j0z]

I used a Dremel cutting tool to cut the stock air box. It goes without saying, once you cut this part, you can never recycle, sell or repurpose the other components of the stock air box. Also, your ability to wade in deep water has now changed. Please adjust your off-road driving techniques (as is in … don’t wade in deep water)!

SAFETY FIRST! Proceed at your own risk. Be safe and take precautions when cutting this component. Always use protective eyeglasses when cutting.

[attachment=3:23f34j0z]Step 3c.jpg[/attachment:23f34j0z]

Here is an image of the resulting two (2) halves. But we are not yet done … we still need to cut out the bottom portion of the half component we are going to use.

[attachment=2:23f34j0z]Step 3d.jpg[/attachment:23f34j0z]

Going back and forth and test fitting the components, I measure 9.25” (inches from the top to the bottom part of the component I was going to use. Using a table saw, I made the final cut.

AGAIN, SAFETY FIRST! Proceed at your own risk. Be safe and take precautions when cutting this component. Always use protective eyeglasses when cutting.

[attachment=1:23f34j0z]Step 3e.jpg[/attachment:23f34j0z]

Here is the resulting Heat Shield …

[attachment=0:23f34j0z]Step 3f.jpg[/attachment:23f34j0z]


... to be continued with Part 3: How To Upgrade/Replace Stock Airbox (4.4L V8)
 

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Part 3: How To Upgrade/Replace Stock Airbox (4.4L V8)

Step 4: Test Fit your Air Intake Components. Make Necessary Adjustments.

This step required fitting the components without securing the items. This allowed me to verify clearance and fit. Here is what I learned:

a. Cushion the Air Filter from the sharp edges of the front right strut/brace. I used 3M Super Moulding Tape. You can pick this item up from your local auto parts store. While this is double-sided, I only revealed one side. I used this tape due to the adhesive strength and resistance to heat from the engine bay.

[attachment=4:3mvum4s7]Step 4a.jpg[/attachment:3mvum4s7]


b. I was able to fashion the necessary shape for the bracket that will secure the air filter. This bracket is tucked underneath the 3rd O-ring from the kit.

[attachment=3:3mvum4s7]Step 4b.jpg[/attachment:3mvum4s7]

[attachment=2:3mvum4s7]Step 4b2.jpg[/attachment:3mvum4s7]


c. Lastly, I realized I needed to cut out the bottom portion of my makeshift heat shield in order to guarantee clearance for the air filter. Refer to the last image in Step 3 (above).

Here is an image showing a test fit of the heat shield …

[attachment=1:3mvum4s7]Step 4c.jpg[/attachment:3mvum4s7]


Step 5: Complete Assembly.

At this point, installation of the Air Filter is self-evident. Here are pictures of the end result

[attachment=0:3mvum4s7]Step 5a.jpg[/attachment:3mvum4s7]


... to be continued with Part 4: How To Upgrade/Replace Stock Airbox (4.4L V8)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Part 4: How To Upgrade/Replace Stock Airbox (4.4L V8)

More pictures …

[attachment=4:2m43kuzk]Step 5b.jpg[/attachment:2m43kuzk]

[attachment=3:2m43kuzk]Step 5c.jpg[/attachment:2m43kuzk]

[attachment=2:2m43kuzk]Step 5d.jpg[/attachment:2m43kuzk]

[attachment=1:2m43kuzk]Step 5e.jpg[/attachment:2m43kuzk]


Step 6: Front Airlet (Ram Air Flow) – OPTIONAL!!!!

In a separate document, I will detail additional steps I took to allow even more air to enter the air intake. This draws moving air from the front grill as shown below. Currently this passage is blocked.

[attachment=0:2m43kuzk]Slide1.jpg[/attachment:2m43kuzk]

[This is not my vehicle. Used for indicative purposes only.]


[The End]
 

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thats a great write up bro. I did mine as well but as another option for those that dont want to cut the airbox JIC (just in case) you trade it back in or whatever:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Range-Ro ... mainQ5f100

please post how you installed the additional ram air b/c with that kit i may not get as much air from the lower duct.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Part 5: Create Ram Airflow (4.4L V8)

Create Ram Airflow From The Front Grill
(Document reflects modifications to a 2005 Range Rover Westminster Edition for North America)

Disclaimer: I share this information based on my own personal experience for [your] educational purposes only. I do not advocate that you perform this modification. If you choose to do so, you do so at your own risk. I am not responsible or liable for any omissions, damages, and/or consequences as a result of this modification – implied/direct or consequential.

Context:
This is a continuation from my previous write-up on “How To Upgrade Your Stock Airbox.” One of the issues towards creating more HP/Torque is feeding the M62 engine with more air. The stock air box was very restrictive (and for good reason – think off-road). Even with an aftermarket air intake, the main feed was from the passive air coming from within the right front fender wall. Very little air was coming from the front as all incoming air was directed through the radiator.

[attachment=4:1dokqinw]Step Six.jpg[/attachment:1dokqinw]

When I removed the grill, I discovered an option to feed more “air” into the air intake coming through the front grill. I’ve highlighted the steps that I undertook to create an opening for frontal airflow into the aftermarket intake.
Once again, I ask for feedback and comments on how these steps might be improved.

Cheers!


… Continued from “How To Upgrade Your Stock Airbox” ***********************************

STEP 6: Modify the Heat Shield

In a previous post “How to Upgrade the Stock Air Box”, Step 3, we created a Heat Shield. We need to revisit the heat shield and cut again to allow air coming from the front grill.

[attachment=3:1dokqinw]Step 6a.jpg[/attachment:1dokqinw]

[attachment=2:1dokqinw]Step 6b.jpg[/attachment:1dokqinw]

Step 7: Remove your Front Grill.
In general, you need to remove the front grill to begin to understand where I am going with all of this. I’ve attached a graphic guide that describes how to do this.

[attachment=1:1dokqinw]FG.jpg[/attachment:1dokqinw]

Once the front grill is removed, you will begin to see what we are attempting to do here.

[attachment=0:1dokqinw]Step 6c.jpg[/attachment:1dokqinw]
 

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Part 6: Create Ram Airflow (4.4L V8)

Step 8: Create a cut-out template

Here is the cut-out on the driver’s side.

[attachment=4:23k6135b]Step 6d.jpg[/attachment:23k6135b]

[attachment=3:23k6135b]Step 6e.jpg[/attachment:23k6135b]


Step 9: Mask and Cut

[attachment=2:23k6135b]Step 6f.jpg[/attachment:23k6135b]

[attachment=1:23k6135b]Step 6g.jpg[/attachment:23k6135b]

[attachment=0:23k6135b]Step 6h.jpg[/attachment:23k6135b]
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Part 7: Create Ram Airflow (4.4L V8)

[attachment=4:30tzaz7u]Step 6i.jpg[/attachment:30tzaz7u]

[attachment=3:30tzaz7u]Step 6j.jpg[/attachment:30tzaz7u]


Step 10: Create a Vent Cover

We could stop here and put the front grill back together. However, I wanted to create a modicum of filtration/protection to the air filter. Remember the stock air filter? I destroyed the OE air filter to gain access to the steel mesh that is a component of the air filter

[attachment=2:30tzaz7u]Step 6k.jpg[/attachment:30tzaz7u]

Use a Dremel Cutting Tool again to cut a strip 2 inches wide and 8.5 inches long.

[attachment=1:30tzaz7u]Step 6l.jpg[/attachment:30tzaz7u]

[attachment=0:30tzaz7u]Step 6m.jpg[/attachment:30tzaz7u]
 

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Part 8: Create Ram Airflow (4.4L V8)

[attachment=4:3magzs0z]Step 6n.jpg[/attachment:3magzs0z]

[attachment=3:3magzs0z]step 6o.jpg[/attachment:3magzs0z]

[attachment=2:3magzs0z]Step 6p.jpg[/attachment:3magzs0z]

[attachment=1:3magzs0z]Step 6q.jpg[/attachment:3magzs0z]

The FINAL Assembly

[attachment=0:3magzs0z]Step 6r.jpg[/attachment:3magzs0z]
 

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Part 9: Create Ram Airflow (4.4L V8)

[attachment=2:3ea7ymhm]Step 6s.jpg[/attachment:3ea7ymhm]

[attachment=1:3ea7ymhm]Step 6t.jpg[/attachment:3ea7ymhm]

[attachment=0:3ea7ymhm]Step 6u.jpg[/attachment:3ea7ymhm]

xxx Fini xxx
[The End]
 

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Great tutorial, and very well done! May I ask, do you notice a different sound to the exhasut? (I am guessing you have a stock exhaust) Also, is the new horsepower gain very noticeable? Just curious. Thanks.
 

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Re: How To Upgrade/Replace Stock Airbox (4.4L V8)

Thanks for the positive response. I can't say I notice any difference in the "sound" of the exhaust (and yes, I have a stock exhaust - for now). I can't say with any hard evidence that there is a horsepower increase. As I mentioned early in the post, other vendors (i.e., Hamann, LandRoverXP.com) claim horsepower increases with their air intake offerings with dynosheets to prove it. I just expect my mod to parallel their gains. What I can say for sure is there is a torque increase and greater throttle response based on driver feedback (my own). There is a difference in "feel" before the mod and after the mod in terms of torque/throttle response.

I live in North Texas. The ambient air temperatures in July and August (right now) are between 87-102 degrees. I have AutoEnginuity (with Land Rover Expansion Pack) hooked-up to the RR. I am recording between 87 - 132 lbs/min as the airflow rate through the MAF with an intake temperature around +180 degrees. I just wish I recorded these numbers before the mod - oh well. What I am saying is that as the weather cools down, I expect the performance to be even greater. If I can feel it now, I wonder what it will be like when the summer season is over.

I have both documents in a PDF if you are interested. Just email me.
 

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That's a good question. When I set out to do these mods, I never considered that aspect. I did these mods around the July 4th weekend. After 45 days and 1000 miles, the filter looks new and I can still smell the K&N Oil that was applied to filter from the factory. The weather in North Texas during this time has been mostly hot/dry with bouts of heavy rains (as in pouring cats and dogs). I've driven in both conditions and can say the filter still looks NEW.

I will have to keep checking and will keep you posted.
 

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D_Rover said:
That's a good question. When I set out to do these mods, I never considered that aspect. I did these mods around the July 4th weekend. After 45 days and 1000 miles, the filter looks new and I can still smell the K&N Oil that was applied to filter from the factory. The weather in North Texas during this time has been mostly hot/dry with bouts of heavy rains (as in pouring cats and dogs). I've driven in both conditions and can say the filter still looks NEW.

I will have to keep checking and will keep you posted.
or put something like this over your ram screen and/or filter:

http://www.knfilters.com/search/wrap.aspx

just a thought yo....
 

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Thank You! I think it is a good idea to add this pre-filter to the whole mod setup. I looked online and found that K&N RE-0810PK is the appropriate filter wrap for the K&N Air Filter RE-0920 used here. It is about $24 dollars and can be ordered at any Autozone store (Check the K&N site for more dealers).

I went ahead and got one today.

Again, thanks for the great input!
 
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