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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
It's been quite a while since I was here, owing to a house building project, while my poor old 2001 P38 Vogue ('er outdoors) has spent her time either under a car cover outdoors, or parked up in a garage on stands. I'm (finally) now in a position to decide the way forward with restoration and I really need the advice of you experienced restorers. Based upon the photos of the underside, is she still ok to restore without major replacements.....or....?

The body is good. The interior is perfect apart from a dropped headlining. The engine (73000 miles only!) runs well with only one tiny oil leak. The EAS pumps up but I know those bags are iffy! There are no electrical issues except a seat memory error. That exhaust & those discs have to go, I know.

What do you all think about the suspension, chassis etc etc...?
Thanks in advance for any help & advice

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Those discs need replacing but other than that it looks no different to any other car that has been left standing. Even the exhaust looks good, it's still got paint on the back boxes, never seen that before. No structural issues there, all it needs is a bit of use and splashing through a few puddles to get the underside looking like all the others. Slop a bit of anti rust and underseal around the odd bits of chassis that have surface rust to stop it spreading, a set of discs and pads and attack the propshaft universal joints with a greasegun and that is about all it needs. Another thing that isn't obvious but can suffer if a car is left standing is the two steel fuel pipes where they run above the fuel tank. One tiny oil leak is your main problem really. If you'd had a decent one like most, or multiple little ones, the underside would have been liberally coated by the Land Rover automatic chassis anti-rust system.
 

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A good pressure wash and brake rebuild everything else looks like alot of road oil build up and surface rust from the undercarriage paint being road blasted. I am thinking if the discs mount are than bad the calipers are most likely froze up as well. It doesn't look bad at all. Just oily which may through up a leak flag during inspection.

Reminds me of the Girling suspension oiling systems on my old Royces and Bentley's. Every 100 miles you would press a fourth pedal up under the dash and a tiny amount of oil would be applied at each front suspension joint and rear spring attachments. More often or not I would remember this while on the freeway knowing dang well it was little more than blowing off and preventing rust... and messing up my leather leaf spring gators. :mrgreen:
 

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I wouldn't be positive those disks wouldn't clean up. Definitely check the all the fluids, flush the radiator and brake lines with fresh fluid. Is it possible to spin the oil pump and build oil pressure prior to starting? Like in the old days of spinning distributor shafts with a drill prior to firing rebuilt engines.
 

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Norcal, those rotors are toast, there are obvious wear lips at the edge. The price of even genuine new parts make such parts not worth screwing with. The brakes are most likely original with only the front pads replaced at some point. The carriers are pitted, calipers are caked with rust, guide pins will be beyond cleaning. You might save the carriers, the rest is a safety issue in that condition. Brake parts are cheap, do it right on safety issues.

Oil pumps on P38s are housed in the front cover and self priming. They can NOT be primed like distributor Classic engines... because there is no distributor on a P38, nor do they need to be primed after a long storage. You simply make sure you have a full oil level, charged battery and fire the engine up. Oil pick up is instant and full flow flow takes well under 10 seconds matched with full pressure. You may have another 5 seconds or so of lifter rattle while they fill after sitting for so long... still no damage is to be expected from an old Buick engine with only 73K miles. It's a painfully noisy restart any time you bring any engine with lifters out of storage. You deal with it if your new and roll your eyes if you are used to it and it lasts more than 20 or 30 second. Then, if your ignition and fuel systems are even at base line, any engine will smooth out, quite down and you can identify odd issues like misfire due to a rat chewed high tension lead, dirty injector or... crap, varnished fuel filter that is restricting fuel flow.

Argos if the old girl was well cared for before storage, she will not take much to get running again, then you can hunt down any rodent damage... if any.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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84 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Many, many thanks guys!
I suppose after leaving her for all that time, I wondered whether it was only rust holding the suspension components together :neutral:

I did fire her up 6 months ago for about 5 mins and was amazed at the "first turn of the key" startup.
After that I fitted the delrin rods to stop her settling on the stops and put her on 4 x 6 ton axle stands, so I could move underneath. I suppose it was the first time I'd really looked at the whole thing, so was a bit concerned.

I bought the car 3 years ago as a project when my work had eased off and sorted the rear axle oil leak and notorious alarm battery drain, but then work suddenly got busy and I didn't get the time. Then a building project "stole" my funds. Despite some of the popular motoring "experts" in the UK saying "Don't even think of buying one of these troublesome things". I disagree. I think it's the next Range Rover in line for classic, ultra-desirable status. Once the crap ones with badly fitted coils and LPG have all disappeared, we'll be left with the best ones.
I saw a really tidy Vogue for £13K the other day (not a special)!

Having bought a car which was £50K when new for £4K, I always said that if I couldn't get it to run, I'd just put a flat screen TV on the dash and keep it as a small television lounge! :thumb:

However, I'm dusting off the 4 ton jack and my Nanocom and all the other tools I bought a while ago and we'll make a start.

Thanks again for your opinions and help!
 

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Norcal, those rotors are toast, there are obvious wear lips at the edge. The price of even genuine new parts make such parts not worth screwing with. .
I don't disagree that they are likely toast. But cast iron is weird, its creates a very brittle oxide that flakes off easily and just keeps rebuilding the layer. But if static, and not flaked off, it can protect itself leaving a surprisingly well protected metal underneath. Its a stretch but hit it with a wire brush to make sure. My thinking is that frozen calipers, guide pins, and nasty brake fluid are the first order of business.
 
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