Range Rovers Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
My P38 DSE 1996 is now riding on high and my Nanocom tells me that the pressure sensing switch is stuck on open.
It did this a few months ago and the Nanocom seemed to clear it; but not this time.
I do have a new switch which I bought when this first happened.
At that time I saw either a video or pictures showing where the switch exactly is and how to change it. but I've forgotten, and search as I did I can't find the info again, either on the internet or within these threads.
All - any information will be much appreciated.

Brian J
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Today (14th) I finally started on the switch replacement. On the 16th the car goes in for what is known as a 6-monthly "Warrant of Fitness" test, and it will probably fail if the suspension is stuck on high.

I found two very helpful videos / pages.
http://paulp38a.com/range-rover-p38/eas-valve-block-renew/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8Gdsc6880c

Removing the EAS pump was easy - I'd been there before.
Removing the air pipes was not; my hands are not all that strong and it was a battle.

The next bit should have been easy; but the C141 connector mentioned in the video proved to be impossible for me to separate into two. So I proceeded with it intact.
Next I had to remove the two red leads of the old sensor unit. Difficult. I got one off BUT with the second one I tore the wires off.
I'm not sure what to do next. These long pins actually run almost right through; I will probably have to try and punch out the one with the ripped wires
Electronics Wire Electrical wiring Technology Auto part


Closer view

Wire Electrical wiring Electronics Cable Technology


Mouse right-click on an image and choose new tab to view larger. Larger view is much clearer.

Suggestions - remedies very welcome.
Brian J
 

·
LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
4,229 Posts
The connector has a locking tab on the underside of what is shown in your picture. You need to press this in fairly firmly whilst pulling the connector apart to get it to shift.

With it apart, you can remove the yellow pin-locking plate and then remove the individual pins.

If it is quite stiff to move, even with pressing down on the locking tab, then press and hold tab/half of connector with one hand, and the other half of the connector with the other hand then wiggle them around a bit to get it to release and pull apart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I too have difficulty separating auto plugs. I find a marine spray called (Corrosion Block) helps, soak the connector and get tape wrapped pliers on each side and wiggle them back and forth to loosen and then get a small small screwdriver to help lift the interlock, Once apart you could use a pin removal tool and replace the pin and re crimp them to the wire. Finding the specific pins and tool could prove difficult, A quick and dirty repair would be a wire jumper joined with butt connectors.
 

·
LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
4,229 Posts
I think he has a new pressure switch to install, which should have come with the pins already crimped to the wires, so once the old one is removed the new pins should just push straight in.

I use a small jewelers/precision screwdriver to lift the locking tabs in these type connectors, but other small items usually work (maybe a pin or a small paperclip).
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, I DO have a new switch already. My dilemma now is how to extract the old pin that I have torn the wires off. There's nothing enough remaining to get a grip of.

I'm wondering if I should drill a new parallel hole in the plastic and push the new pin through that. And then somehow force it to line up on the contact side.

I've never heard of or seen a pin removal tool. I'l ask around the electricians here as see what they can tell me.

Messy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Tool accessory Technology Circuit component Auto part Electronic device

Here is a picture of a multisize pin removal tool this one by Lysle and it costs about $15 US I would think an electronics shop would be a good place to ask about them. This tool would fit in your hand. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks ovolvo.
I'll go looking !!

That sent me off on a search. There are zillions of connector extraction tools out there, for all kinds of trades; watchmaking and others as well as auto-electrical. And they are not inexpensive.
I will probably have to order from overseas if I can't find a local source (none seen yet). If I can't find one in the morning I'll probably bodge up a temporary fix for the WOF test on the 16th (to make the P38 road-legal), then do a decent job when the tool arrives after the Christmas break.
 

·
LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
4,229 Posts
Seriously you are over thinking this.

Get the connector apart first.
Second, a pair of small pliers to grab the locking insert and yank it out.
Third, small flathead precision screwdriver, and use it to lift the pin lock.
Fourth, with screwdriver in there holding the pin lock, use pliers to push the pin back out of the connector until you can grab hold of it and fully remove it.

Once old one is out, new pressure switch pins in.

If you don't have anything at home that will work, then somewhere like Dick Smith's or Jay car will have cheap tool sets with everything in it you need. No waiting for bits to arrive from overseas and a working system for the WOF
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Seriously you are over thinking this.

Get the connector apart first.
Second, a pair of small pliers to grab the locking insert and yank it out.
Third, small flathead precision screwdriver, and use it to lift the pin lock.
Fourth, with screwdriver in there holding the pin lock, use pliers to push the pin back out of the connector until you can grab hold of it and fully remove it.

Once old one is out, new pressure switch pins in.

If you don't have anything at home that will work, then somewhere like Dick Smith's or Jay car will have cheap tool sets with everything in it you need. No waiting for bits to arrive from overseas and a working system for the WOF
Thanks Marty;
You have just exposed more of my ignorance :)
I'm proceeding cautiously in case I wreck more complicated little bits and end up swimming with sharks.
1. Got the connector apart despite that concealed lock-tab. Who would have guessed it was under there.
2. What is the locking insert?
3. What is the pin lock?

I can see that the pins have a complicated shape; flat with a couple of "ears" sticking out, and I wondered why the shape had to be so complicated when a round rod shape should be adequate.
I have got myself all set up to make a pin (removal) driver from a 4 inch nail with a 2 mm hole drilled into the end cut off square. Sounds as though I may not need to bother with that.

I've just about given up trying to meet tomorrow's time deadline for the WOF ... What initially was expected to be a fairly simple operation has turned out to have some booby traps.

I look forward to more info. Sorry about taking so much of your time.

Brian J
 

·
LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
4,229 Posts
The locking insert is the yellow plastic bit that surrounds all the pins.

The pin locks are individual little tabs that lock each pin in place to stop them pulling out.

I will try and get a picture later from one of the connectors I have here.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think I have figured it out. It's just after midnight right now; will know for sure in the morning. To summarise, what I thought was a bed of yellow plastic is in fact a loose lining of yellow plastic inside the one half of the multi-plug, and it is retained by two tiny barbs on one of its sides which engage two equally small holes. It should be possible to release these two barbs/catches and pull out this lining. Should be no need for a tool to force the terminals out of the plug. Ingenious device.
 

·
LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
4,229 Posts
I think I have figured it out. It's just after midnight right now; will know for sure in the morning. To summarise, what I thought was a bed of yellow plastic is in fact a loose lining of yellow plastic inside the one half of the multi-plug, and it is retained by two tiny barbs on one of its sides which engage two equally small holes. It should be possible to release these two barbs/catches and pull out this lining. Should be no need for a tool to force the terminals out of the plug. Ingenious device.
Yes, as I stated above - the locking insert is the yellow plastic bit that surrounds all the pins.

To get it out, I just use a small pair of long nose pliers. use a screwdriver to bend one side in a bit to get one of the plier jaws down, then grab hold of the yellow bit in the jaws and give it a pull and the yellow bit comes out.

Inside, each pin has an individual small black plastic lock which holds it in place. use the small screwdriver to lift this slightly, whilst you give the pin a push with the pliers to back it out of the connector.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Not the result I was hoping to report.

As far as I can tell I installed the new pressure-sensing switch OK. I cleared the faults using Nanocom.

Of course all the pressurised air has gone out of the system, and I know it is important to jack up the body so that the pump does not have to work real hard right from the start and thereby damage the airbags.

BUT, the dash screen display says EOS fault, the system has no air in it, and the other indicators show the EOS is sitting on high, with all 5 red lights showing on the switch thingie alongside the switch for selecting ride height.
Currently baffled, not to mention disappointed.


Getting all those parts back in was quite a mission.

Cheers, Brian J
 

·
Banned
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
I know it is important to jack up the body so that the pump does not have to work real hard right from the start and thereby damage the airbags.
Huh, that's a new one on me. Why would you need to jack the body up? That's what the air springs are there for. It's no different to dropping it to access height and then rising it back up to standard.

The EAS has gone into hard fault so won't do anything until you clear the faults and reset it. Use the Nano to do that, start it up with the door open so it doesn't try to move, make sure the pump is running (and pumping) and after 8 minutes or so you should have enough air in the tank to raise it up as soon as you close the door.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'll try the Nanocom again, but twice already it has told me the faults are cleared.
Tomorrow - it's 10:22 pm here right now.
It was quite a trick exercise to get all the bits back together; not a lot of space in there.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
First try a failure; faults cleared - so what could it be? I figured that maybe I had not pushed all the little air pipes in far enough, so applied more force to them all.
Success; thanks to all for your help.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top