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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Just picked up a pretty nice 2000 SE 4.0, 96K miles. No repair history, just a clean carfax and an invoice from a recent trans. service. I park it next to my Classic. One issue I noticed is a sloppy 2-3 upshift, not as smooth as the classic.. Downshift is fine. Should I be concerned? My classic has been bulletproof transmission wise, with 200K miles. Will replace shocks soon, probably with OEM. Did that to the Classic with happy results. Apparently there is no trans. dipstick, how do I check levels? Only other issue is the cruise button does not light up, so no cruise. Where to begin the search? Still in the sort out mode, but seems pretty straight so far. Open to any feedback!
Thanks in advance.
 

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Change transmission fluid and filter along with all other routine maintenance you would do on a new used car. Level is checked by parking on level surface and removing fill plug with the engine running. Fluid should be filled until it pours out of the plug opening.

Brett
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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1,070 Posts
There is a trouble shooting guide in RAVE (electrical section) for the cruise control.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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53 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Will do that, makes sense. Trans in Park or Neutral? Does it make a difference?
 

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Will do that, makes sense. Trans in Park or Neutral? Does it make a difference?
I don't think it makes a difference. Park is easier. When refilling after draining old fluid, partially fill with a few quarts. Start engine and cycle through the gears, then leave running and fill until full. ATF change was my least favorite routine maintenance job on the Rover. Royal pain to fill so much fluid through the fill hole without a lift. Manual pump is hard work. Electric fluid pump or air pressure driven system would make it much easier. I rigged up a funnel with a 5-6 ft long hose that I snaked down, underneath, and then up into the fill hole from the side of the truck. I attached the funnel to a ladder or cart (anything higher than the fill hole), and I could then pour fluid while standing beside the truck. Meanwhile the engine is running and the exhaust is heating up, and you have to dodge the hot cats while crawling underneath to finish the job.
Brett
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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If I was having to lie partially under the car, I'd feel a little more secure if it were in Park.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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there s no way:shock: i would lay under any car,even partially,if it is running,my opinion only,for safety
 

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With a post '99 P38, you've no other choice if you want to check the gearbox fluid level.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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the choice you have is do it right on a lift,with a mechanic,and mate,in a garage,who does it for a living,or lay underneath,at risk of injury or worse to your self,NO CONTEST?
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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53 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Agree with Wooly, will follow that advice. Have already learned that chainsaws and ladders are a poor combination, no need to annoy the Fates.
 

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the choice you have is do it right on a lift,with a mechanic,and mate,in a garage,who does it for a living,or lay underneath,at risk of injury or worse to your self,NO CONTEST?
And, How many of us have lifts in our garages....? If you're really concerned, chock the wheels, set the E-brake, and don't let your kids crawl around inside while you're under the car. You could also put the axles up on jackstands. As far as a professional mechanic, well, I'm about to crawl under one of my cars to fix a repair job botched by a professional...

Brett
 
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