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Hey everyone. Just purchased a 2003 Range rover. I brought it to the mechanic for a full inspection and service (oil,coolant,etc) as well as new pads/tires. The mechanic gave me the all clear, and said it runs great and shows no issues. I have been driving it for 3 days after getting it back, but noticed the check engine light was on after the mechanics, as well as the red exclamation mark within the red circle on the right side of the dash.


Tonight I was driving to the drive thru and used the defrost/windshield heater buttons for the first time. The defrost did not seem to work out of the dash, and I am unsure the if the coils in the window worked as well. The windshield was fairly foggy when an oncoming vehicle approached. I left the heater on half for around 10 minutes, and as I stopped in the drive thru I noticed my temp. gauge was just under 3/4 towards hot. I immediately turned off the defrost, and windshield heater buttons, and when I did this, the temp. gauge IMMEDIATELY dropped back down from 3/4 to half. I was in the drive thru for 10 minutes, and after got back onto the highway with no overheating.

As I arrived down into my town off the highway, and slower speeds, I noticed the temp. gauge start to creep upwards again. It did not reach the 3/4 level as before, but was in between 3/4 and nominal temp.

Can anyone help me out:)


Thank you!
 

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Defrost engages the A/C, heated windscreen uses huge amount of electricity and put a strain on the alternator to keep up with demand. However, overheating in a drive through points to a cooling system need some attention ASAP. The cooling system on the first 322s leaves alot to be desired by design. The bottom rows of the radiator provide the cooling for the transmission cooler. They are located below the bottom hose so circulation is poor. I would be checking the surface of the radiator with an IR thermometer. If you find cool spots you most like have clogged up radiator.
 

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Awesome thank you for the reply.

I drove the Range Rover on the highway today for around 150 miles. The overheating only occurs around 10 minutes after I have started the vehicle, or when I reach highway speeds. The temp. gauge climbs to 3/4 and will stay stuck, and then after about 2-3 minutes it drops back down to normal. When I approach a hill , the temp. gauge will climb just as i'm climbing the hill, then proceed to drop back down to normal temp. after I have leveled out.

I have checked the anti-freeze as well, and there are 0 leaks and the coolant is not overflowing through the relief cap. This leads me to believe a clog in the radiator, OR , I have read on here that the cooling lines run from the bottom of the radiator to the transmission and can sometimes experience clogging ( IE. overheats as I climb a hill, sediment/gunk clogs the lines ).

The Range Rover had been sitting for 8+ months before I purchased it as well if this makes a difference.

Thank you.
 

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I can only suggest you approach this with a little more serious stance. Inspect the radiator and make sure you have adequate flow from your water pump. Inadequate cooling in any circumstance can very quickly make for a really crappy day and large repair bills.
 

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For sure. Going to have it towed to the mechanic on Monday. I was very easy on the throttle, and made sure it didn't go above 3/4 or I would have pulled over. I absolutely LOVE the Range tho, my first one. The seating position makes you feel like a king on a clouded throne.
 

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mechanic? uhm at least try a few things yourself. go grab an infared thermometer. They can easily be had for under $15.

Open your hood to service position, unplug your A/C compressor and start your rig. let it get up to temp. using the IR gun scan the A/C condensor from the front. Sounds off but you will be picking up the heat on the front of the radiator. Reading will be low... but don't concern your self with the actual numbers. Look for consistent even readings across all areas. Chances are lower areas may be cooler due to sediment. if you have any cooler area you may have an issue.

Alternate method is to disconnect the fan shroud, slide it to the rear and remove the fan so you can maneuver the shroud out of your rig. repeat and read on the back side of the radiator. again you are hoping for even readings. Have someone keep and eye on the temp gauge just to be safe. if you find cool spots and hot spots, especially towards the bottom rows, you have clogs or corrosion and you most likely need a new radiator. Follow RAVE . step by step with drawings and photos. Search for a radiator, ther i snothing wrong with after market from Radiators. com or whatever companies you have up there. Just make sure to read the fine print. Three row is always better than 2 row.
 
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