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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #1
I thought you guys would get a kick out of this one:
I was driving from Calgary to Fernie this weekend, and the #6 line from the valve block to the tank decided to leak hard.
So I believe the compressor overheated and hard faulted me with 70km to go.

This was the result:
IMG_0976.JPG
#stancenation


IMG_0978.jpg
After clearing the codes at Canadian Tire we tried to hold the air line in place using #1 just zip ties, then #2 a 2x4 and zipties, then #3 a spring and zip ties.


I figure you guys will enjoy seeing this photo:
IMG_0979.jpg

For those with a keen eye (sorry for the blurry photo not showing the air lines well):
The spring is compressed against the #6 airline and the brake accumulator, a zip tie is holding the spring from flying in to the engine bay, and another zip tie is used to straighten the air line as it enters the valve block (using a hose clamp).
To deal with the compressor overheating I used ziploc bags and ice, and zip tied them to the top of the compressor.
Changed the ice bag whenever it would be melted (about every 50km or so) to keep her nice and cold.

Made it home and discovered that the o-rings are just too old and compressed.
So I'm getting new 6mm x 2.5mm (and the 8mm ones while I'm at it) o-rings and going to redo the air line connections.

Ah the joys of British automobiles.
 

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Absolutely. Rering the entire valve block, rebuild the compressor and you are good for another 100K miles.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #4
Okay I was thinking I'd start with trying to solve all of the air leaks on the air lines first before tackling the rebuild.
I've had the valve block already on the bench this week, so I'm not concerned about the job.
I'm looking to get her airtight first, as I think the compressor and valve block are still functioning above 80%, but I know for a fact that my air lines aren't.

Do you see more value in rebuilding the valve block or compressor first?
Would you recommend the compressor kit with the whole piston and crank or just doing the o-rings?
 

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If you have overheated your compressor I would start there.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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9 Posts
I have a related question: how hot is too hot for EAS compressor ? What is normal operating temperature after, say, 40 minutes riding in the city ?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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125 Posts
Do you not have an EAS bypass system?
I keep end plugs in the car. Any leak I pull the air line, plug it, and pump that wheel up manually
I have a ball valve on the line going to the reservoir, just close it and pressure stays high
If you want photos I will take some
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah photos would be nice, I'm not sure how you pump them up manually
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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You need some fittings and some 6mm pipe, 4 colours would help, about a metre of each
Try this place or similar http://abilityhose.ca/index.php
Mine look like this
EAS Bypass 1.jpg

Then remove the 4 air-lines from the valve block and put a T on each line, either nylon press-in fittings or the more leak proof screw on ones. At the other end you connect a Schrader (tyre) valve, you would use a valve per wheel
I used 4 ball valves, two 2 into 1 connectors and two schrader valves, I can pump up and one or two wheels
I also put a ball valve onto the line to the reservoir, when I want to work on the valve block, I close the valve to keep it full
Photographs at the bottom - if you right click on a photo and open new tab you can see higher resolution

Any compressor that can pump to about 5 bar is good enough, commercial forecourt compressors are very fast, be carefull
Look at the car and pump till it is high enough to drive, about three fingers between wheel arch and tyre
Front is heavier so needs more air, I make left and right equal
I keep connectors and plugs in the car, if a valve fails completely, pull the air line, plug it and pump it up

You can disable EAS by removing fuse 44
EAS Bypass 6.jpg
To check which wheel is leaking I remove fuse 44 (the one showing the fuse remover) and leave car overnight to see which one goes down
By removing fuse 44 you bypass EAS completely, raise and lower via external compressor
I had a leaking RF so I pulled the line out the bag and connected a ball valve, it still went down, so obviously the bag side not valve block side. New o-rings stopped the leak.
I eventually had no more leaks with fuse 44 removed, so all remaining leaks were in valve block
Go to http://paulp38a.com/ and download the valve block rebuild guide PDF, very clear step by step guide

This is my bypass system
EAS Bypass 2.jpg

EAS Bypass 3.jpg

EAS Bypass 4.jpg

I also put a schrader valve and ball valve onto the reservoir line, I can fill reservoir form external compressor after working on the system. Saves the expensive on-board compressor
EAS Bypass 5.jpg

You are welcome to email me with questions [email protected]

Y
ou can also Google "EAS bypass", lots of info
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I have a related question: how hot is too hot for EAS compressor ? What is normal operating temperature after, say, 40 minutes riding in the city ?
Running in the city they get really hot and wear quicker as the car keeps trying to adjust all the time, silly place under the bonnet, if you want total re-build it will last at least 3-4 years as long as you do it properly or fit a viair 380c in the boot, new plimbing and a little more noise but ya can use it as an air compressor to blow your tyres up etc as well, get some emergency inflation valves and keep em in the glovebox that way you can inflate it from an airline and drive home, ya fault codes are showing a compressor fault ( valve stuck open ) is where its trying to fill and sticking closed, pressure signal low is pump, signal incorrect is more like ride height sensor take it off and clean the connections she wont go up until ya fix this and its so simple to do, everything on the eas is simple and easy once ya get ya head round it.

The system is a pain and thick in many ways, once ya got her up she will be a gem once again.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Running in the city they get really hot and wear quicker as the car keeps trying to adjust all the time
Only if you have a leak, once the reservoir is up to pressure and the air springs inflated, it shouldn't use any air.
if you want total re-build it will last at least 3-4 years as long as you do it properly
You're not doing it properly then. The originals all lasted 10-12 years before starting to fail and only then because the air springs started to leak and made the pump work harder.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Only if you have a leak, once the reservoir is up to pressure and the air springs inflated, it shouldn't use any air.
You're not doing it properly then. The originals all lasted 10-12 years before starting to fail and only then because the air springs started to leak and made the pump work harder.
Depends on the running I think, if you park on a kerb she adjusts, every 3 hours she adjusts over night, why not recylcle the air in stead of blowing it back out into the air ?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #13
@WilliamRR That was an incredible post, nice setup you have! I have a leak somewhere along my RL path, so I'll start with the soapy water trick and hopefully get it air tight. That being said I am keen to have an on-board air system separate for airing down tires and whatnot, and having the Schrader valves on the airlines and tank is a great idea.
 

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I had a problem using soapy water and foam, everything is slippery afterwards

If I had a RL leak on my system now, I will open the ball valve at the front and deflate the RL bag using the schrader valve, then remove the air line from the valve block and block it with a plug, then pump it up again and leave it overnight.
If it still goes down then it is the o-rings on the airbag connection, or the bag, or lastly the pipe itself.
If it stays up then it is the o-rings where the pipe goes into the valve block, or the o-rings in the valve itself
Most likely the o-rings into the valve block, try foam there first
To me the above was the quickest way to find the problem
Remember you can drive, not fast though, with the airlines removed from the valve block, just remove the fuse to disable the EAS
I am retired and at home, you can ask as many questions as you like
There is a time difference, it is now 4 in the afternoon here
 
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