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I just replaced the two pcv hoses that were bad, i noticed oil below the truck before fixing the hoses and thought thats what it must be, well after fixing the hoses there is still oil leaking from somewhere, it seems below the general area below where the pcv hoses are, any ideas where it could be coming from or best way to find out?

TIA :D
 

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There are three hoses in the PCV system. 2 hoses from the rocker covers go into the cyclone, then the oil flows from this back into the sump via a 2" long thinner hose that then connects onto a metal tube. It looks like a pig to do, but I think is easier if you take the cyclone unit off (only 2/3 bolts).

It could also be your rocker cover gaskets, these are the next failure point (especially if you've just plugged one leak)
 

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Dan_UK_1984 said:
There are three hoses in the PCV system. 2 hoses from the rocker covers go into the cyclone, then the oil flows from this back into the sump via a 2" long thinner hose that then connects onto a metal tube. It looks like a pig to do, but I think is easier if you take the cyclone unit off (only 2/3 bolts).

It could also be your rocker cover gaskets, these are the next failure point (especially if you've just plugged one leak)
Should this statement "then the oil flows" read "then the oil vapour travels" ?

Not being pedantic as it was Dan that taught me what the PCV system is for. Removing leaked Oil Vapour from the Crankcase, and re-burning it via the intake system for emission control purposes. :D
 

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Gazellio said:
Dan_UK_1984 said:
There are three hoses in the PCV system. 2 hoses from the rocker covers go into the cyclone, then the oil flows from this back into the sump via a 2" long thinner hose that then connects onto a metal tube. It looks like a pig to do, but I think is easier if you take the cyclone unit off (only 2/3 bolts).

It could also be your rocker cover gaskets, these are the next failure point (especially if you've just plugged one leak)
Should this statement "then the oil flows" read "then the oil vapour travels" ?

Not being pedantic as it was Dan that taught me what the PCV system is for. Removing leaked Oil Vapour from the Crankcase, and re-burning it via the intake system for emission control purposes. :D
No - The oil vapour enters the cyclonic canister, as it does this centrifugal forces separate the oil from the vapour, therefore the oil can then drain back down into the sump (think dyson, dusty air in = dust at the bottom, air out the other end) :geek:

Ace 95 said:
I cant seem to find the smaller 2" hose, where is it located? :x
On the below image its # 6C342A

[attachment=0:24v7n8ni]Emission%20control.jpg[/attachment:24v7n8ni]
 

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Dan_UK_1984 said:
Gazellio said:
[quote="Dan_UK_1984":1eizzblf]There are three hoses in the PCV system. 2 hoses from the rocker covers go into the cyclone, then the oil flows from this back into the sump via a 2" long thinner hose that then connects onto a metal tube. It looks like a pig to do, but I think is easier if you take the cyclone unit off (only 2/3 bolts).

It could also be your rocker cover gaskets, these are the next failure point (especially if you've just plugged one leak)
Should this statement "then the oil flows" read "then the oil vapour travels" ?

Not being pedantic as it was Dan that taught me what the PCV system is for. Removing leaked Oil Vapour from the Crankcase, and re-burning it via the intake system for emission control purposes. :D
No - The oil vapour enters the cyclonic canister, as it does this centrifugal forces separate the oil from the vapour, therefore the oil can then drain back down into the sump (think dyson, dusty air in = dust at the bottom, air out the other end) :geek:

Ace 95 said:
I cant seem to find the smaller 2" hose, where is it located? :x
On the below image its # 6C342A

[attachment=0:1eizzblf]Emission%20control.jpg[/attachment:1eizzblf][/quote:1eizzblf]

I stand corrected :doh:
 

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Gazellio said:
I stand corrected :doh:
Have you figured out how the PCV system in the Jag engine works yet, or if it's a weak point? BMW suggest changing the cyclone every 50,000 miles. LR do not. I would be interested to see if there are Jag service items that LR ignore.
 

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Dan_UK_1984 said:
Gazellio said:
I stand corrected :doh:
Have you figured out how the PCV system in the Jag engine works yet, or if it's a weak point? BMW suggest changing the cyclone every 50,000 miles. LR do not. I would be interested to see if there are Jag service items that LR ignore.
Not sure if it even has the same system. Will try to find out.
 

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Definately wont be the same - but will still have a PCV system of sorts. Hopefully they used hose that doesnt melt when it comes into contact with oil.
 

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Interesting article:

Your PCV valve breather system today to help regulate your car's hazardous waste products. As your engine runs, combustion gases escape from the combustion chamber, finding their way into the crankcase of your engine. This unused combustion gas, also referred to as "blow-by," is a very strong cause of smog. In the early 1960's, the EPA deemed 'blow-by' to be hazardous to the environment and decided that it should not be allowed to freely escape from one's vehicle. To prevent this pollutant from escaping into the environment, the automobile industry started fitting engines with a PCV valve, or 'positive crankcase ventilation' valve, to ensure that this gas remains contained within your vehicle. In naturally aspirated engines, the PCV valve connects the crankcase to the intake manifold. It does this from a location nearly opposite of the breather location. This connection creates a slight vacuum in the crankcase that draws gasses in a direction from the breather into the intake manifold and through the PCV valve, where they are re-burned with a fresh charge of air. In forced induction engines, there is no breather and the PCV valve is attached to an oil trap. Most manufactures recommend that you change your PCV valve regularly to ensure that all 'blow-by' remains in the vehicle. A malfunctioning PCV valve can allow smog causing pollutants and oil to escape from your engine and into the environment. From Aftermarket PCV valves to complete replacement aftermarket breather systems, you can find all your PCV breather system needs here http://www.fcpgroton.com/category-exec/category_id/63/nm/Breather_System_PCV_/sub_top_menu_item/by_make-by_model-by_year/by_make/31/by_model/1092/by_year/56
 

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On the Rover V8 the PCV system fed directly into the plenum chamber after passing through a gauze filter to separate the oil from the vapour, so as above the gasses were burnt, it was a very simple system, but after time could be prone to blocking.

On the M62 engine it's basically the same theory but instead of the gauze filter its the cyclone, the enemy for the cyclone is water vapour usually - the child of lots of short journeys where the engine never gets up to temperature for long enough to burn off any water in the oil. As the oil and water congeal it blocks the cyclone drain which means the oil/water mix lingers in the tubes causing all sorts of problems, from excess pressure (which will usually cause rocker covers to leak) or vacuum issues.
 
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