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Discussion Starter #1
Is there a write up on the oil change steps for a 2004 Range Rover?

I've searched and not found a detailed DIY. I'm interested in the size of the bit needed to loosen the drain bolt, pic of where drain bolt is, and is it a hex bolt?

I've found the reset instructions for the service intervals and filter up top removal part down.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Procedure 10-15 in the RAVE manual.

Do a search, download it, and get under you truck and get dirty.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response. I downloaded and opened it up, but it's missing the info I was looking for which is the actual hex bit size that is needed to loosen the drain plug.

Very helpful though to have the RAVE. You definitely need to be in the know with the Rover!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Awesome. Thanks for the response! Will be changing it out this weekend. Have a good one.
 

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Make sure you hold the base of the oil filter firmly, if you wrench it loose without supporting the base, you'll likely rip it from its mount.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think the 17mm is the size of a socket wrench and not the actual hex bit. At kragens and the hex bit actually looked more like the 5mm size on the drain bolt.
 

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you can open it with either a 17mm hex socket.. or a hex bit.. I'll check the size of the hex bit for you tommorow. The oil filter housing thats 36mm but make sure you hold the housing as the rubber mounts can break easily.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the response. Oil change successful! It was a 6 mm hex but previous oil changes have stripped the bit part a bit so I ended up using the 17mm socket in the end.
 

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I had to replace the pan on mine as the threads were stripped from the previous oil change. I used a torque wrench as didn't want the same problem again.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
No you shouldn't need to use a torque wrench. Hand tighten the screw first and then use your socket wrench. If you have a torque wrench available to you by all means use it but you should be able to feel via hand when the screw is sufficiently tightened.
 
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motosport3 said:
No you shouldn't need to use a torque wrench. Hand tighten the screw first and then use your socket wrench. If you have a torque wrench available to you by all means use it but you should be able to feel via hand when the screw is sufficiently tightened.
Yep, and the careful bolt material selection, washer thickness and material grade and torque settings specified by the engineers is just made up BS to make their jobs seem worth while. :naughty:

As an engineer it really annoys me when people spout off ignorant advice like this. The bolt size, coupled with the washer material and thread size / pitch is carfully selected / tested to match the torque required to give you a seal, compress the washer so there are no leaks while not stripping / damaging any of the components.

You sound like a grease monkey at a kwicky lube stop. "If I can spin it on with an air wrench, she'll be good"

Arrrgghhh :x . Rant off.

Use a torque wrench on the important bolts (head, oil, wheel etc) and go by feel if you REALLY have to on the less important ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Fair enough. I can't argue w/ the logic of doing the job as it was meant to be done. I recant my advice.
 
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A very dignified response sir. I apologise at my boorish outburst.
:oops:
But still, people, use a torque wrench when ever possible. 5 mins with a torque wrench can avoid a lot of time and $ later.
 

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Mr. Range Rover said:
motosport3 said:
No you shouldn't need to use a torque wrench. Hand tighten the screw first and then use your socket wrench. If you have a torque wrench available to you by all means use it but you should be able to feel via hand when the screw is sufficiently tightened.
Yep, and the careful bolt material selection, washer thickness and material grade and torque settings specified by the engineers is just made up BS to make their jobs seem worth while. :naughty:

As an engineer it really annoys me when people spout off ignorant advice like this. The bolt size, coupled with the washer material and thread size / pitch is carfully selected / tested to match the torque required to give you a seal, compress the washer so there are no leaks while not stripping / damaging any of the components.

You sound like a grease monkey at a kwicky lube stop. "If I can spin it on with an air wrench, she'll be good"

Arrrgghhh :x . Rant off.

Use a torque wrench on the important bolts (head, oil, wheel etc) and go by feel if you REALLY have to on the less important ones.
Are you saying you should use a torque wrench to tighten the oil drain plug? It actually sounds like you're saying, "you have to." I think that's a bit overkill. IMO it's not going to hurt, but if you can't torque that one down by hand without stripping threads/causing an oil spill, you probably shouldn't be doing an oil change in the first place.

That being said I own a nice torque wrench and would never dream of shimmying under the car with it to tighten the oil drain plug. I wouldn't tell someone they can't successfully complete an oil change without a torque wrench...

I would agree when you're doing heads, clutch, things that rely on a specific tolerance a torque wrench is a must. IMO you can get away with an oil change without one.
 
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I'm saying do whatever you want, it's going to cost you money to fix the screw up, not me.

If done at the proper frequency, the oil drain bolt has to be one of the most frequently touched fasteners on the car. With that comes damage, and wear of the respective parts. If you don't clean the threads and use a new washer, then there's no point in using a torque wrench, as torque is a function of friction, a unit that is changed by repeated use if not done with consistency (say by doing it by hand over and over again) and contamination.

If not done with consistency, eventually, the bolt will start to weep oil due to over stressing the threads (or plain under tightening). Common practice when faced with a weeping oil drain bolt is "tighten her up another turn" rather than change the bolt and washer for new ones. Ultimately, the "extra turn" results in stripped threads (usually in the oil pan) or an explosive release of the fastener while the vehicle is in motion (very rare, but an unforgetable sight to see, with an oil slick all over the road)

if you have ever been faced with a stripped oil drain bolt that required an axle / sub frame removal to replace the oil pan, or an over torqued spark plug that required a head to be removed to fix a broken plug, you'd probably use a torque wrench more often.

But like I said, engineers just spec a torque setting for sh_ts and giggles. :lol:

Edit, to add: I never said you couldn't, But I will say you're foolish if you don't.
 

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Mr. Range Rover said:
I'm saying do whatever you want, it's going to cost you money to fix the screw up, not me.

If done at the proper frequency, the oil drain bolt has to be one of the most frequently touched fasteners on the car. With that comes damage, and wear of the respective parts. If you don't clean the threads and use a new washer, then there's no point in using a torque wrench, as torque is a function of friction, a unit that is changed by repeated use if not done with consistency (say by doing it by hand over and over again) and contamination.

If not done with consistency, eventually, the bolt will start to weep oil due to over stressing the threads (or plain under tightening). Common practice when faced with a weeping oil drain bolt is "tighten her up another turn" rather than change the bolt and washer for new ones. Ultimately, the "extra turn" results in stripped threads (usually in the oil pan) or an explosive release of the fastener while the vehicle is in motion (very rare, but an unforgetable sight to see, with an oil slick all over the road)

if you have ever been faced with a stripped oil drain bolt that required an axle / sub frame removal to replace the oil pan, or an over torqued spark plug that required a head to be removed to fix a broken plug, you'd probably use a torque wrench more often.

But like I said, engineers just spec a torque setting for sh_ts and giggles. :lol:

Edit, to add: I never said you couldn't, But I will say you're foolish if you don't.
Never had an issue doing it by hand, and I've always done it by hand, for 15 years. I guess if you're not repair savvy and have no concept of torque values maybe you should use a torque wrench. I can see where you're coming from though, not trying to say you're wrong... You're not, I just don't bother.

With that said I did use a torque wrench when rebuilding this blower.

 

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brad s1 said:
[quote="Mr. Range Rover":vzztcr0q]I'm saying do whatever you want, it's going to cost you money to fix the screw up, not me.

If done at the proper frequency, the oil drain bolt has to be one of the most frequently touched fasteners on the car. With that comes damage, and wear of the respective parts. If you don't clean the threads and use a new washer, then there's no point in using a torque wrench, as torque is a function of friction, a unit that is changed by repeated use if not done with consistency (say by doing it by hand over and over again) and contamination.

If not done with consistency, eventually, the bolt will start to weep oil due to over stressing the threads (or plain under tightening). Common practice when faced with a weeping oil drain bolt is "tighten her up another turn" rather than change the bolt and washer for new ones. Ultimately, the "extra turn" results in stripped threads (usually in the oil pan) or an explosive release of the fastener while the vehicle is in motion (very rare, but an unforgetable sight to see, with an oil slick all over the road)

if you have ever been faced with a stripped oil drain bolt that required an axle / sub frame removal to replace the oil pan, or an over torqued spark plug that required a head to be removed to fix a broken plug, you'd probably use a torque wrench more often.

But like I said, engineers just spec a torque setting for sh_ts and giggles. :lol:

Edit, to add: I never said you couldn't, But I will say you're foolish if you don't.
Never had an issue doing it by hand, and I've always done it by hand, for 15 years. I guess if you're not repair savvy and have no concept of torque values maybe you should use a torque wrench. I can see where you're coming from though, not trying to say you're wrong... You're not, I just don't bother.

With that said I did use a torque wrench when rebuilding this blower.

[/quote:vzztcr0q]

Is that going on the Rover, please tell me it is :)
 
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