RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does any one run an oil catch can? Coming from hemi's in Jeeps I always ran a catch can to keep the nasty used oil out of my motor. I saw an option for one from repairmanuals.co and wondered if any one has used them... I imagine the supercharged 5.0 V8 would benefit from it as well.

If any one has run it, where does it mount? The company is not very responsive to emails and does not have a phone that works which also causes me to hesitate with it.
 

·
SUPER MODERATOR
Joined
·
27,705 Posts
So this 40 dollar PVC replacement/add on claims "maximum energy, increased fuel economy and increased power." It says it prevents engine knocking... the ECU does that already based on the fuel used. When you browse through the various Land Rover models they all come up with the same generic kit.

So other glowing marketing on hand full of the sales sites, most reviews, on consumer sites, of these catch cans call them a gimmick and a waste of money. Did you seriously notice increased HP in your Jeeps because of a catch can?

It all just sounds like snake oil to lighten your wallet. A properly maintained AJSC engine with quality fuel will always be more than enough for a heavy SUV like the Sport.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
It's a HEMI thing that is prone to that issue. It's basically a dinosaur design as far as V8s go. Our V8s are like something from the Jetsons in comparison.

Don't sweat it.
 

·
SUPER MODERATOR
Joined
·
27,705 Posts
Yes good point. The three series Dodge engine came out in 1964 just a couple years after the Buick engine that became the Rover V8. The 318, 340 and 360 were Dodge's mainstays with very few changes up through 2002/2003. Just as the Rover V8 was production standard through 2004 and is still in use by other manufacturers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
The Ford EcoBoost engines are prone to a similar problem and catch cans are used with a fair amount of regularity amongst the Ford owners (I have a 2016 F150 with the 3.5 V6 twin turbo EcoBoost). I have a difficult time understanding why this little contraption would be so beneficial? If the OEM had meant for one to be included, it would have been engineered into the engine by now, considering they're on their third generation of EcoBoost motors. People claim that the turbos are the culprit and that after so many thousands of miles, you get decreased power and will get engine shuttering as a result. I'm not sure about all that but if its really so beneficial, I figure the dozens of engineers at Ford would have figured this out by now.

I wouldn't touch one and would definitely not be putting it on a Range Rover. The recent generation of engines JLR provides are pretty solid from what I've seen so why mess with something that isn't really broken? Secondly, if the company doesn't have a working phone, model specific parts and doesn't respond to emails, that should tell you loads of information about their products (they're crap).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I agree with all the above. I won’t be getting one...

I didn’t notice a hp increase with the hemis but definitely was emptying the thing fairly often and just figured it was better to not have that going back into the motor to be burned off. It’s more for emissions regulations was my understanding. It’s purely anecdotal but I never had any engine issues while using one. I was thinking more for protection and longevity of the motor as opposed to increased performance. But regular maintenance can accomplish the same thing.
 

·
JACK'S GRANDAD
Joined
·
9,197 Posts
I run old school v8's. And have yet to see a reason for such a piece of crap.
A 4.6 in a DII is nearly as old school as the built LSx in my Range Rover. Both pushrod V8's with 2 valves per cylinder.
If you get one though, I have some beachfront property for sale in Arizona.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
I too am curious to see if anyone else runs a PCV Catch Can here, especially with the AJ133? I ran one on my port injected, supercharged Pentastar V6 and it made a big difference in keeping the runners and supercharger cleaner. Have never heard of anyone getting more power.

The main advantage with a Direct Injected or Forced Induction Direct Injection engine especially would be not sending oil vapor back into the intake, where it winds-up as Carbon Build-Up on the runners and intake valves. Port Injection cleans the back of the intake valves to a degree (still looked nasty in my old engine before cleaning), Direct Injection leaves the intake valves to accumulate oil vapor.

In a port injected engine this just seems like a good idea, however in a Direct Injected engine it seems almost a necessity to prevent walnut shell blasting the intake valves.

I am new to the AJ133 but no to Direct Injection and I am looking at Catch Can installation now along with using a lower volatility (NOACK) engine oil.
 

·
SUPER MODERATOR
Joined
·
27,705 Posts
Apparently the answers above are a resounding no. It's not a matter of anyone "else" running one of these gimmicks. Why would you say, "especially with the AJ133"?

Apparently no body here will touch them with a barge pole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
It's really not a "gimmick" at all. Pull your Intake Manifold or Supercharger and you will see. On a port injected engine, you will see a varnish from fuel and blow-by, on a direct injected engine you will see carbon build up. There is a reason professional engine builders install these systems.

So why don't manufacturers install PCV Catch Cans? It is because people have enough trouble accomplishing basic scheduled maintenance like oil changes without also emptying a can. It is simply easier for manufacturers to meet emissions requirements by routing the blow-by back into the intake; that does not mean doing so is good for the engine.

Long before the EPA, emissions testing, PCV systems and even DOHC engines, the blow-by just leaked on the road.

Think and believe what you like, but carbon build up does not magically appear on the back of intake valves in direct injected engines. I don't sell catch cans, or anything else but I have used them and have seen the benefits. I do not believe any combustion engine benefits from aspirating blow-by gases especially forced induction engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Doc is correct. Having a lot of experience with Direct Injection (DI) BMWs (N54 and N55 motors), DI engines (from all manufacturers) suffer from eventual carbon build up on the back of the intake valves. Over time this causes the engine to run "rougher" and can result in misfires if not addressed over the long term - this effect gets magnified if running a tune due to the more advanced timing. Catch cans do not eliminate the carbon build up issue but do indeed help in extending the time between valve cleanings. Because they don't eliminate the problem entirely, some folks may be okay with just having their valves cleaned more often. I personally don't run one - don't really rev the RR as hard as one does in a BMW so.....

The increased operating temperatures of modern engines, to improve efficiency and as a result of FI, causes oil to sort of "vaporize" more than usual which gets sent back into the intake (bc EPA) and then eventually builds up on the intake valves. On port injected vehicles, because the fuel was injected before intake valve this build up is cleaned off in real-time. Additives and intake cleaning solutions such as seafoam don't clean the valves on DI cars; additives never hit the valves and the buildup is too hard for seafoam type solutions to actually work.

The known effective method of removing this buildup is using walnut media in a sandblaster. BMW actually has recommended service intervals and specific tools for this job. You can probably get away with 100k before issues start cropping up on newer motors - potentially more with a catch can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I had a Audi previously, and it is also known to have carbon build up on intake valve.

Oil catch can is not a gimmick IMO.

Please share information on where to install the catch can, so I can follow your path.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
For the latest generation Corvettes, the warranty is voided with the installation of a catch can. GM issued a statement regarding this subject.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
There is no gimmick to an oil catch can. Will it increase HP, Not at all. Its only purpose is to keep carbon that DI engines are notorious for from building up on the valves. All the new DI engines from every manufacturer could benefit. So 4.2 and 4.4 engines not really necessary but the 5.0 engines would definitely benefit from having one.

It is sad that people have to respond to posts with poor information about issues they dont understand just to put in their .02.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
When I was emptying almost a full .20L can of oil at every change on my 6.1 Hemi I was pretty certain it was not a gimmick. Can't speak to the blown 5.0.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
796 Posts
From what I've heard the 5.0 SC engines have a tough time venting the oil that climbs back up into the manifold so carbon build up eventually becomes an issue. So here's the thing about all this carbon build up controversy.... Everyone including Toadhall will say it's BS but if the 5.0 engine is a DI engine then it's an issue. How much of an issue? No one really knows. Obviously there is no way to tell UNLESS someone actually installs one and sees how much oil actually gets spit back into the breather system.

The bottom line here is that if the 5.0 is a DI engine then yes there should be one, not to get more HP or miraculous fuel savings (it's a heavy 8 cylinder beast, never expect that). It's just to prevent oil and burnt up crud from clogging the valves and thereby let your engine run better and dare I say, maybe just a teeny tiny bit more efficient. Now that it's 2018 the manufacturers are beginning to change engine design to make fuel spit onto the top of the intake valves to prevent this issue. This video lays it all out pretty well. I'm actually considering putting one in my 5.0SC but waiting to see if anyone else has ever done it.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
I used a catch can on my last in-direct injected V-6 with Magnuson Roots-Hybrid SC and you would be surprised how much oil I had to empty from the can every oil change. Though less of an issue for non-DI vehicles, that blow-by is nasty and will foul the intake manifold or supercharger over time with a sticky resin.

So why doesn't every manufacturer use a catch cans for their PCV system? I would say it is because the manufacturers have enough trouble getting the average consumer to maintain their vehicle and because just "OK" is considered "good enough" by industry standards. Pretty much every hot-rodder and gear(petrol)-head I have ever met uses a catch can whether they drive a Subaru STI or a Chevelle.

Good for any manufacturer who adds an extra port injector above the intake valves in order to help clean that carbon off a bit on their Direct Injected models
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
796 Posts
I used a catch can on my last in-direct injected V-6 with Magnuson Roots-Hybrid SC
Lol, yes Doc but have you ever put it on a 5.0SC LR engine? Looking to compare apples to apples.... To this day, I don't think anyone has done it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Lol, yes Doc but have you ever put it on a 5.0SC LR engine? Looking to compare apples to apples.... To this day, I don't think anyone has done it.
Nope, if/when I do it on my NA AJ133 5.0 V8, I will post here for sure. Looking forward to see it done on your 5.0 SC though! Good luck with it.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top