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Yesterday I still had the Coopers on and there was ~1/2" of fresh snow on the pavement. It was cold enough that it was getting hard packed as I drove on it. I tested out the Coopers a bit and concluded that they perform somewhere in between the summer Contis and the Pirelli Ice and Snows (on pavement). Of course I didn't drive the Pirellis on the same day (nor the Contis), just summarizing my other experiences with them.

Here's the deal; I plan on going "Christmas tree hunting" this weekend in the Boise National Forrest. I may travel down some fire roads that would/could have 6-12" of snow, some packed, some not (I decided I will not be making any "first tracks" on any road). There obviously aren't boulders or obstacles on these roads, but I'm looking for any input on what tire would be better suited for this. Definitely will let people know where we're going and have a checklist handy before departure. :thumb:
 

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Well you can add a good camcorder to your check list. If the conditions are like you say they will be, then it would be wrong of you not to include video of you going George Washington in the forest. While you are at it, get some video of the RRS hitting the trails.
 

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you should be fine with any of them. In fresh snow, even the contis do fine. I ran the 20" contis for an entire winter here in Colorado and never had a problem. The grip wasnt great on ice or really packed snow, but I never got anywhere near stuck, and I lived up a hilly road that didnt get plowed.
 

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Sounds like a fun day in the making...a couple of notes from encounters with deep snow.

Sinking into the powder on what may appear to be a packed road can leave you with an unexpectedly long day, so preparation is key. Above 12 inches of soft snow on a dirt road or soft pack and you start to get into a dicey situation...18 inches and you're stuck. Unfortunately I have not found any chains that fit over the 285/60/18's...not enough clearance with the steering rods to allow the chains in there.

I highly recommend bringing 2 shovels, one for you and one for the mrs. to help in clearing out snow that gets stuck around the wheels and underneath the vehicle in case you happen to bottom out. A pair of old carpet strips to get traction, or if you happen to know anyone in the LR club - some sandtracks. Failing that, you can always use your rubber floor mats, but that would probably ruin them...

Also note, that airing down on snow doesn't work, you need taller tire profile, rather than wider, so keep the pressures up.

Other than that...a SPOT device or personal locator beacon when you don't come out after a few hours to tell people where you are...

:D :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
kstatenupe said:
Well you can add a good camcorder to your check list. If the conditions are like you say they will be, then it would be wrong of you not to include video of you going George Washington in the forest. While you are at it, get some video of the RRS hitting the trails.
@ the GW. Camcorder is a good idea, I was only thinking of stills... I'm not sure of the conditions yet, though there should be snow up there already - I've never done this before, hilarity may ensue.

PJPR01 said:
Sounds like a fun day in the making...a couple of notes from encounters with deep snow.

Sinking into the powder on what may appear to be a packed road can leave you with an unexpectedly long day, so preparation is key. Above 12 inches of soft snow on a dirt road or soft pack and you start to get into a dicey situation...18 inches and you're stuck. Unfortunately I have not found any chains that fit over the 285/60/18's...not enough clearance with the steering rods to allow the chains in there.

I highly recommend bringing 2 shovels, one for you and one for the mrs. to help in clearing out snow that gets stuck around the wheels and underneath the vehicle in case you happen to bottom out. A pair of old carpet strips to get traction, or if you happen to know anyone in the LR club - some sandtracks. Failing that, you can always use your rubber floor mats, but that would probably ruin them...

Also note, that airing down on snow doesn't work, you need taller tire profile, rather than wider, so keep the pressures up.

Other than that...a SPOT device or personal locator beacon when you don't come out after a few hours to tell people where you are...

:D :D
Thanks PJ, I definitely don't want to go near 12" and I didn't think about 2 shovels! I should have a friend going also, so that would make 3? :lol:
 

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I can't resist...
[youtube:2jrg6eci]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7T4TyOWR8U&feature=related[/youtube:2jrg6eci]
 

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Discussion Starter #8
gooseyloosey said:
I can't resist...
:lol: Clark, "a little full". I'm not saying this won't be comedy, stay tuned.

gooseyloosey said:
Oh 3E, not sure if its in your family budget this year, but I've always wondered about how these would work on a RRS.
http://www.mattracks.com/html/105_series.htm
No it's not, I already ordered the skat trak paddle tires from Bob's Mud Boggin' Warehouse remember? :mrgreen:
 

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I've found the wet slushy kind of snow to be the worst. Something like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xHvo49JEy1c

But you may not run into that until Spring. Last year I got myself halted on slushy covered forest service roads with a previous 4x4 running siped Toyo M/Ts. I was doing fine until I came to a significant grade (which there frequently are on service roads), and then just sat with all 4 tires spinning on the slippery gravel underneath the slush. Ever since I've been wondering what the best tire would be for that. I've been looking for a snow tire more aggressive than the Pirelli's to handle mud and deeper snow. Something like the Blizzak DM-Z3s might be the ticket.

Now I have Nitto TGs, which are similar to the Zeons and I'm anxious to see how they compare. I'll find out a little later in the season.

Also, you can just pick up a set of Spikes Spiders to put on over the Zeons for anything hairy. I had these on an old Audi Allroad and was unstoppable. They make the "sports", mostly for icy roads, and the "Alpine Pros" for the deep stuff. They both fit 285/60/R18 because they don't wrap to the back side of the tire, so steering rod clearance shouldn't be an issue (I say *shouldn't*, I haven't actually tried it).

http://www.spikes-spiders.com/catalog/view/product/70/
 

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JeffW said:
Now I have Nitto TGs, which are similar to the Zeons and I'm anxious to see how they compare. I'll find out a little later in the season.

Also, you can just pick up a set of Spikes Spiders to put on over the Zeons for anything hairy. I had these on an old Audi Allroad and was unstoppable. They make the "sports", mostly for icy roads, and the "Alpine Pros" for the deep stuff. They both fit 285/60/R18 because they don't wrap to the back side of the tire, so steering rod clearance shouldn't be an issue (I say *shouldn't*, I haven't actually tried it).

http://www.spikes-spiders.com/catalog/view/product/70/
Also running the Nitto Terra Grapplers...found them to be quite capable until 1.5 feet of snow and then...stuck! Hardly the tires fault though I think.

Those spikes spiders are quite interesting - good design there, and a bit pricey too...but looks like a good tool if you're frequently in snow country... :D :D
 

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EEE.

Sounds like some adventuring is in mind and depending on how much and how far you want your RRS to go-the sky is the limit !
I've figures the Interco Super Swamper is made close by and an all-season tread is on the cards with another set of rims Mista.

Their 285/65R18 rubber snow shifters are lower speed rated for the cooler temperatures with enough grip for the drive home.
If you can find a set of 18 inch wheels that are 10" wide, a P30 offset appropriate for the RRS should get you a 30.8" tall tyre ?

Cheerio,


Vinniman
'88 Highline
Perth, W.A.[attachment=0:2h2z5luw]SSM-16ii.jpg[/attachment:2h2z5luw]
 

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JeffW said:
Something like the Blizzak DM-Z3s might be the ticket.
Just a heads up. If the roads are always always snow covered these are fine. If you drive them regularly on dry pavement I have had problems w them (2 sets did this). Each tread block starts to wear irregularly due to the tread block squirming on the pavement and your car will sound like a tank after about 10K miles.

So I had the alignment checked (all was fine)and a replacement set was put on and the same problem appeared again. They got so god-awful noisy that I finally took them off and chucked them with tons of tread life still left. Based on my discussion with the tire guys and with a Bridgestone rep this is related to the high tread block pattern and the rubber compound on these tires. The answer was don't drive them on dry pavement. You know how hard it is to drive from NJ to VT without going on dry pavement?

I switched to Dunlops (made by the same company but a different tread pattern) and they're going on 20K with no issues. I actually think snow traction is better w the Dunlops.

By the way, MT tires are not very good in snow. The tread and rubber compound is designed to shed mud, so tread blocks are wide/solid and the rubber compound is relatively hard and slippery. Snow tires are soft and sticky, with smaller tread blocks with small sipes. Rub you hand on a snow tire tread and it feels sticky even in low temp.
 

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Drove in 12" of unplowed roads this morning with no problem whatsoever. The studded Nokians just dominate in it. We're supposed to get another 10-12", so I'll give another report later....
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Lots of good input here, thanks guys.

JeffW said:
Wow, aweseome find! There looks to be 3 options for the 285/60/18; too bad the pricing wasn't for all four tires! :evil:

vinniman said:
Their 285/65R18 rubber snow shifters are lower speed rated for the cooler temperatures with enough grip for the drive home.
If you can find a set of 18 inch wheels that are 10" wide, a P30 offset appropriate for the RRS should get you a 30.8" tall tyre ?
[attachment=0:3r397x7l]SSM-16ii.jpg[/attachment:3r397x7l]
I'm not sure I'd need 10" wide, the 18x8 LR3s I have work awesome for the 285/60s Cooper LTZs (all terrain that everyone else is using also). 30.8" would be great, but a 285/65 is closer to 32.5" which is a little beyond the max of 32" that seems to need the rod mod and slight work to the sheet metal inside the rear wells (at least on LR3s). Good looking tread though!
 
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