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Discussion Starter #1
Hi - first post here and it involves a Triumph TR8. I have a 1980 TR8 with the same Rover 3.5 block that your Rovers used for years that I want to swap for a late 4.0 Range Rover set up. I am primarily doing this to make passing CA SMOG easier, the power boost and ease of starting etc are nice adds.

To do that in CA I need to be able to show that I brought over all the emissions gear from the model year that I am doing the swap for, so in this case a '99 or 2000 4.0 Rover. I was hoping that I could ask for your help in getting a full list of items I'll need. What I have so far is;

EFI harness
Correct intake etc
Crank sensor
O2 bung and sensor
Air pump (TR8 has)
Cats (TR8 has)
Return fuel lines etc

Could I get some coaching on what other items I will need please?

Thanks in advance.
 

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You will be much better off using the 1999 (early) information. It eliminated the secondary air injection, more complicated Bosch system and follows a lighter emissions standard. You will still have to deal with the four O2 sensor vs the 2 your TR has (if I remember correctly) if you use the Rover GEMS ECU. If I stew on this a bit I will remember a few more things from my Triumph days
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You will be much better off using the 1999 (early) information. It eliminated the secondary air injection, more complicated Bosch system and follows a lighter emissions standard. You will still have to deal with the four O2 sensor vs the 2 your TR has (if I remember correctly) if you use the Rover GEMS ECU. If I stew on this a bit I will remember a few more things from my Triumph days
This is hugely helpful, thanks. Would '98 be the same or is an early '99 idea for you think? Where do the o2 sensors on the Rover go, exhaust down pipe still? Think I can user the Rover ECU and engine wiring harness?

Thanks again.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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You can tell straight away by the type of air intake. Earlier GEMS engines have a big square plenum with "4.0" or "4.6" cast onto it, later Bosch engines have a sort of pile of sausages dumped in the V and loosely hooked up to the throttle body.

Both are well-documented. The GEMS stuff doesn't really do OBDII properly because it's a bit too early for all that, but it's a ridiculously simple system to understand. You can get the ECUs modified to remove the immobiliser, like for TVRs and Morgans.
 

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The GEMS stuff doesn't really do OBDII properly because it's a bit too early for all that...
:shock: 1996 and newer GEMS engines are fully OBDII compliant and have no issue with most any generic code reader.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Simple is good, and California will require the test equipment plug in just like the donor year Range Rover.

So does it matter on the specific model year 1996-1999? Worried that if there is a mid-year 1999 cut-over that could create confusion at the time of inspection and I think it is best if I keep this as clear as possible for the SMOG referee.

Here is a link to the primer on the rules:

http://www.bar.ca.gov/80_barresources/07_autorepair/engine_change_guidelines.html

"If a computer–controlled engine is installed in a non–computerized vehicle, the "CHECK ENGINE" light, the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) diagnostic link, and all sensors, switches, and wiring harnesses needed to make the system fully functional must also be installed."

Thanks - and hope this is a fun thread for everyone.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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:shock: 1996 and newer GEMS engines are fully OBDII compliant and have no issue with most any generic code reader.
Only on the US models where OBD compliance became mandatory earlier than in Europe. I think in the US it was from 1996 but for the rest of the world it didn't happen until 2000. A generic code reader will work but not fully on a European GEMS.
 

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As he is in California that is not an issue and only serves to confuse the topic.
 

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:shock: 1996 and newer GEMS engines are fully OBDII compliant and have no issue with most any generic code reader.
Well, except for the oddball lambda readings (which to be fair are scaled because OBDII expects 0-1V outputs), MAF readings, and lack of any other flow or pressure readings.
 

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Ahh but Gordon, we're in the UK so ours only serve to confuse the topic by not being fully compliant........

Just because the OP is in the US we don't know where he is sourcing his engine from. There appears to be a big price difference between values in the US and values over here. A known good engine can be bought here for £500, a whole car for under £1,000. Even with shipping costs I suspect it would be cheaper than buying over there.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Fair point, but in this case I am souring the engine from my local Range Rover specialist that would be doing the work. Easier this way and adjusted for the cost of messing about cheaper.

Thanks.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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One thing you appear to have missed off your list is the EVAP canister and purge valve which even European models have fitted. I know how strict they are in California though, I've got a car here that was recently imported from LA where it had failed it's smog test yet passed ours no problem at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Bummer - I talked to the CA a referee today and since the Rover is a special class of vehicle (light duty rather than car) I can't do the swap.

From the record, the referee was super helpful and had a let's make it work attitude.

I'd like to say thank you very much for those that responsed here, thank you.
 
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