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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #1
92 SWB 3.9

Recently on a long trip from running some National Forrest Service roads for fun I started having what I think are cooling issues. Historically my classic has run about 1-tick to the left of center, even under load (not including last summer’s towing until this last trip. On the highway, steady speed between 65 & 70 the temperature needle got its way to the top of the white and almost in the void between white and red. No air conditioning at all. In fact I had to turn the heater on to keep the needle from creeping into the void.

Naturally I assumed the radiator was partially blocked so I ordered new top and bottom hoses, and thermostat and prepared to completely flush the radiator chemically...twice. I flush the block out as well but didn’t remove the plugs. After filling it properly and adding water wetter I was hoping the issue would be solved. Today’s drive proved otherwise...maybe, hence the question. Today I drove with the air conditioning on and went for a drive up some steep grades at 55mph (state highway speed) and the temp got to almost where it had been to pre-flush and fill, but never higher. So my questions are: what’s the normal operating temperature range under load? Should I just replace the radiator as preventative mx?

I’m moving to Arizona in June, and while this isn’t my daily, I’d like it to be ~reliable on the trails there with the air conditioning going.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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33 Posts
RAVE manual says thermostat opens at 88 deg C (190 F). Condenser fans come on at 212 F to assist with cooling.

Normal operating temperature range under load depends on various factors. I used Rover Gauge to monitor my 95RRC when I was having overheating issue and it runs somewhere between 180-195F.

I now have a 180F thermostat to keep the needle one click left of center to keep my rig on the cooler side.

I would check out the fan and water pump first before replacing the radiator. My issue was the viscous fan.
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1989 Range Rover Classic
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170 Posts
Sine your issues are while at speed, airflow is not your problem. When moving at/near freeway speeds, the forced airflow from movement is your primary cooling, not the fans. If you overheated while sitting in traffic, you've got a fan problem. I would strongly suggest having your radiator rodded out by a radiator shop (they separate the core and physically clear the gunk out) to clear all the passageways, as even a chemical flush will do little clear clogged/corroded cooling channels. Also, I recommend verifying the gauge's accuracy, as the sending units are not know to be the most reliable things. If you have a laser thermometer, take it for a spin where it gets hot and quickly pull over, pop the hood, and aim the thermometer on the water neck to see if it really is as hot as the gauge says (210+ at the end of the white). I've fought cooling issues in these many a time, it can be a pain to sort it fully out.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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I live in AZ, Welcome. heat is the issue. You will want to run up to the mountains for cool and good trails in the summer. You will be running 75 - 85mph and long pulls up pretty good grades. Phoenix is appx 1800 feet and Flagstaff is 7000; the peaks are near 12,000 although you can't drive that high. That's in the course of 140 miles.
I installed a temp gauge running from the top of the radiator. While the true temp numbers may not be accurate it does show you mounting temps in real time. I have rodded and flushed my radiator several times and last summer just plain replaced it. Use the proper tstat, don't save $5.00 bucks. Although my factory temp gauge seems to work correctly I feel more comfortable with two gauges.

You can never get it too cool for summer Phoenix. Work on your AC also. here"s the statement "Stuck on the closed I17 for 2 hours last Sunday afternoon @ 115" you'll want good cooling and good AC.
good luck geneo
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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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175 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks much, everyone!

what radiator did you end up with? I’ve read recommendations on the azlro forum but I cannot find the Calsonic ones.

I live in AZ, Welcome. heat is the issue. You will want to run up to the mountains for cool and good trails in the summer. You will be running 75 - 85mph and long pulls up pretty good grades. Phoenix is appx 1800 feet and Flagstaff is 7000; the peaks are near 12,000 although you can't drive that high. That's in the course of 140 miles.
I installed a temp gauge running from the top of the radiator. While the true temp numbers may not be accurate it does show you mounting temps in real time. I have rodded and flushed my radiator several times and last summer just plain replaced it. Use the proper tstat, don't save $5.00 bucks. Although my factory temp gauge seems to work correctly I feel more comfortable with two gauges.

You can never get it too cool for summer Phoenix. Work on your AC also. here"s the statement "Stuck on the closed I17 for 2 hours last Sunday afternoon @ 115" you'll want good cooling and good AC.
good luck geneo View attachment 285919 View attachment 285919 View attachment 285920 View attachment 285919 View attachment 285920
 

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spent the money, got the good one from AB. unless someone can prove better, you can't mess around with cooling out here.
 

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also, my aux gauge normally reads under 212, even when pulling some of the hills with AC at temps. I've seen it go to 220. Just click off the AC compressor till you creast the hill and watch the gauge drop fast. you're still blowing recurculated air through cool vanes, so it's not too bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
spent the money, got the good one from AB. unless someone can prove better, you can't mess around with cooling out here.
When you good one are you saying the BritPart one sold by AB? ESR74?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Done and installed. Full flush, redline water wetter and new thermostat to compliment the new copper Britpart radiator and so far it’s running really well. Took it on a 4 hour journey with ac on and plenty of hill climbs, and it never cracked above normal. I think I’ll install another temp gauge just to be safe.
Thanks for the help!
 

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1989 Range Rover Classic
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Done and installed. Full flush, redline water wetter and new thermostat to compliment the new copper Britpart radiator and so far it’s running really well. Took it on a 4 hour journey with ac on and plenty of hill climbs, and it never cracked above normal. I think I’ll install another temp gauge just to be safe.
Thanks for the help!
Did you buy the Atlantic British one? I bought the ESR74 from AB and it wasn't a Britpart, it was built by Glasgow Radiators in Scotland. Seems like pretty solid quality.
 

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Did you buy the Atlantic British one? I bought the ESR74 from AB and it wasn't a Britpart, it was built by Glasgow Radiators in Scotland. Seems like pretty solid quality.
Britpart also uses plenty of local suppliers. They resell whatever is available
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Did you buy the Atlantic British one? I bought the ESR74 from AB and it wasn't a Britpart, it was built by Glasgow Radiators in Scotland. Seems like pretty solid quality.
No I opted for the LR Direct one. It was cheaper even with shipping
 

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I also installed an aux temp gauge. Just the added sense of security knowing what my temps were. Also added an oil gauge, but I have yet to figure out how to install to sender.
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Aux temp gauges are a very good idea, the factory ones are not that accurate. I added one as well, it's a dual water temp (upper) and oil temp (lower) gauge. Sender went into the hot side heater line. I have the links to the parts in another post if you're interested.
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I also installed an aux temp gauge. Just the added sense of security knowing what my temps were. Also added an oil gauge, but I have yet to figure out how to install to sender.
View attachment 286574
I added this sandwich adapter above the oil filter (super easy), it has a bunch of sensor ports on it, so I have an oil pressure sender and an oil temperature sender (1/8"-27 NPT) run from it.

 

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When I resurrected my 1983 RRC it became apparent that the original radiator had has it's time.

It was Copper/brass, low miles (38k) and looking good no furring on the inside but now 35 years old. It would be ok until some more was required: 100deg F Houston traffic jam with AC, slight incline, 70 mph etc. Tried a flush: nothing strange came out nor was there any aparant blockage. Then it started weeping at a seam, probably from my flush... I think that if the problem with old radiators is not always blockage it is the connection between the tubes and the radiator thingies. It cannot shed the heat effectively anymore.

Replaced with a (reasonably) cheap ($200 delivered) aluminium radiator. They changed how the radiator is fitted in a Range Rover at some point it seems and the early ones are hard to get in the USA. I had to adjust the fittings for my aluminium radiator which was also significantly larger and thicker than the original one (good in Texas heat!). I already have electric fans fitted with my Holley Sniper EFI carb replacement so the extra thickness was not an issue.

Aluminium radiators are more efficient in shedding heat, but they last less long depending a bit on use and construction. I expect their weakness is springing a leak. They are cheaper and easier made in small batches so I expect you be able to find one easier than copper/brass, unless you live in the UK where period style parts are more available.

Cooling it indestructible now! I can read out the temp on my EFI system. Normal temp about 190F. One fan kicks in at 200 and the next at 210. Sit in traffic only one fan ever kicks in. With AC on the AC condenser fan alone keeps it cool most of the time. If you switch off a hot engine and let it heat soak to 220 odd, both fans cool it down in maybe a 30 sec after startup then one fan starts cycling.

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