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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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177 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have read many posts about not being able to unlock a L322 with a dead battery using the key in the door. Does this apply to 06-09 or just prior 06. I would not be happy if my battery died this winter -10F. and not be able to open the truck to jump or change the battery. The dealer says its not true, and has never had that issue. Says key in door will open it.
If all of the posts are correct, I'm thinking about running wires up and behind the front tow hook cover for emergency power leads only to power the locks (unlock truck) and NOT to jump start. The stories about the side repeater are hit or miss, and I don't want to take that chance. Also, would be easier to explain to my wife, and AAA how to get into the truck if needed vs pulling the side light, in the cold and stripping wires in the dark on my truck. Not a pretty picture.
Now that I think about it, I would only have to run 1 wire (positive) and use the tow ring as a ground.
All this, just to not get locked out of a car in the winter when batteries usually give up the ghost. Sometimes I really like my 1971 ser III.
Any thoughts?
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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361 Posts
Have you tried the key blade in the driver's door?

Does it unlock your car under "normal" circumstances?

Now would be good time to find out ;)

Owners get so used to using the fob to unlock that many don't even know if the lock barrel works or not.

A little lubrication to the lock barrel once in a while is a useful addition, too.

Rob
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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1,148 Posts
The key switch is not connected to the door lock thru any kind of linkage, it is totally electric going to the BCM or GEM module (whichever your year has). If you have a dead battery and a locked door, you are cooked, unless you can get a slim jim or something similar down the inside of the door, and grab the linkage to the inner handle or the door lock pin which will reconnect the outer handle to the latch mechanism (watchout for the side airbags in the door). This description of the door latch operations is right out of the 2007 thru 2010 Workshop manual;

The side door latches are sealed units that incorporate separate actuators for locking and superlocking the doors. Each door latch also incorporates a Hall effect sensor that operates as an ajar switch to provide a door status signal for the GEM. The driver door latch incorporates two additional Hall effect sensors to provide signals of lock and unlock selections made with the ignition key in the door lock. Turning the top of the ignition key rearwards sends a lock signal and turning the top of the ignition key forwards sends an unlock signal. The driver and front passenger door latches communicate with the GEM via their respective door modules and the P bus. The rear door latches are connected direct to the GEM.


Each of the door latches is connected to a locking button in the top of the door trim panel. Pressing the locking button down when the door is closed disengages the exterior handle from the door latch to lock the door. Pulling on the interior handle extends the locking button from the door trim again and re-engages the exterior handle with the door latch, to unlock the door (without opening the door latch). A second pull on the interior door handle opens the door latch. On all except the driver door, the doors can be slam locked after pressing the button down while the door is open. For lockout protection, the driver door locking button cannot be pressed down when the driver door is open.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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610 Posts
I had bad alternator and battery issued for a month ago
now my key isn’t working on 2006SC

Now i am waiting till monday to test new battery
it will be -40C outside with wind
if I couldn’t open the door with freezing battery i am planning reach to the starter motor for jumping
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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177 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
So it seems to prevent an issue, I need to run a wire at least from the positive post from the battery to an accessible area outside the truck to get temporary power to a dead battery to unlock the truck. I would think that I could use any good ground for the negative connection. I could hide the positive lead/wire behind the front tow hook cover.
Any other ideas?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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177 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
anvilrob
Re: No unlock, with dead battery
Have you tried the key blade in the driver's door?

Does it unlock your car under "normal" circumstances?

Now would be good time to find out


Owners get so used to using the fob to unlock that many don't even know if the lock barrel works or not.

A little lubrication to the lock barrel once in a while is a useful addition, too.

Rob​
The key will not do any good if I have a dead battery.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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People usually pull the side blinker out of the fender and use the wire on it to connect to a small trickle charger. Has to be pretty small as the wire won't handle much current, certainly not enough to jump start the truck but it will provide enough to power up the various computers in the car. If you are really that worried, you could mount a pair of insulated jump points up under the front end somewhere and hard wire the + to the starter or alternator terminal (they are on the same wire) and the other to ground. Something like the Moroso 74140 jumper terminals.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Moroso-74140-Remote-Battery-Jumper-Terminals-6-36-Volts-Red-Black-Set/201110940279?epid=1411784026&hash=item2ed3256a77:g:H18AAOSwU91ab8J8:rk:12:pf:0
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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102 Posts
I had that problem on my 2010 caused by the dealer failing to action a factory re-call which was introduced to overcome a bad software battery drain problem on certain models in that year.
Before I knew what the problem wasand had it fixed, I invested in a C-Tech trickle charger -

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00FC42HAA/ref=asc_df_B00FC42HAA58142110/?tag=googshopuk-21&creative=22110&creativeASIN=B00FC42HAA&linkCode=df0&hvadid=226613731662&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5135800729798933573&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9050359&hvtargid=pla-303286758601&th=1&psc=1

That has a waterproof connector which I wired (with an in-line fuse just in case!) directly to the positive and negative terminals of the battery under the hood, running the wire across the top of the firewall where the waterproof connector exits in the gap between the front wing and the rearmost corner of the hood. Although after the factory re-call was carried out I really didn't need it, I still plug it in every time I put the car in the garage (don't want to waste all of that money!).

I guess if you don't have access to mains power for the charger, you could use the same wiring but connect the other end to a 'jumper' battery to apply power to unlock the doors if the car battery dies.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I had that problem on my 2010 caused by the dealer failing to action a factory re-call which was introduced to overcome a bad software battery drain problem on certain models in that year.
Before I knew what the problem wasand had it fixed, I invested in a C-Tech trickle charger -

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00FC42HAA/ref=asc_df_B00FC42HAA58142110/?tag=googshopuk-21&creative=22110&creativeASIN=B00FC42HAA&linkCode=df0&hvadid=226613731662&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5135800729798933573&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9050359&hvtargid=pla-303286758601&th=1&psc=1

That has a waterproof connector which I wired (with an in-line fuse just in case!) directly to the positive and negative terminals of the battery under the hood, running the wire across the top of the firewall where the waterproof connector exits in the gap between the front wing and the rearmost corner of the hood. Although after the factory re-call was carried out I really didn't need it, I still plug it in every time I put the car in the garage (don't want to waste all of that money!).

I guess if you don't have access to mains power for the charger, you could use the same wiring but connect the other end to a 'jumper' battery to apply power to unlock the doors if the car battery dies.
I was just wondering why no one had used the Ctek adapters for this. Seems to be a very feasible option...even if you just get the adapters and then Frankenstein a different connector instead of using an actual Ctek charger. I have and love my Ctek and will probably explore this soon.
 

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There is some confusion in this thread. The driver door lock key mechanism is connected mechanically to the latch assembly. In other words if your battery is dead you can still unlock and lock the car. This mechanical connection does two things - it physically operates the lock/unlock workings of the latch enabling the door to be opened in the event of a dead battery and at the same time it actuates the electrical switches in the latch which then talk to the various electrical components of the car.

I own a bunch of these cars ranging from 2002 up to 2009 and it applies to all of them. Furthermore I disconnect the batteries on all of my cars every month when I travel away for work and once disconnected I then lock the car using the key and then unlock them again on my return a few weeks later and reconnect the battery.

If the key does not unlock the car it usually means that the physical connection between the lock and the latch is broken or has been fitted incorrectly which is easy to do if one is not careful. Or possibly the latch itself is broken but I have never encountered this.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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There is some confusion in this thread. The driver door lock key mechanism is connected mechanically to the latch assembly. In other words if your battery is dead you can still unlock and lock the car.
Absolutely correct! I should have mentioned that in my case, I park my car in my small UK garage, hard to the left wall so that I can fit in my other car. In addition, with the nose under a 'mezzanine' shelf I cannot open the bonnet to get at the battery!

The key for the door only fits in the left (passenger) side door on my car so I cannot reach it to unlock the door when the car is garaged so with a flat battery the key fob wouldn't work. Of course the simple problem was not to lock the car whilst in the garage - but then, with the readily opened door, I couldn't get the thing out of 'Park' to push it backwards to lift the bonnet to get at the flat battery!

The C-tech charger solved all problems! :)
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover Classic
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3 Posts
I had a similar problem last week. I had accidentally left the lights on overnight and drained the battery. Then a super freeze following rain left the door lock frozen and the key would not turn. Obviously the fob did not work either. However, once the weather warmed up the key did work and i was able to charge the battery and start the car. Mine is a 2005 HSE.
I appreciate the comment about lubricating the lock; that would probably have prevented my issue.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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There is some confusion in this thread. The driver door lock key mechanism is connected mechanically to the latch assembly. In other words if your battery is dead you can still unlock and lock the car. This mechanical connection does two things - it physically operates the lock/unlock workings of the latch enabling the door to be opened in the event of a dead battery and at the same time it actuates the electrical switches in the latch which then talk to the various electrical components of the car.

I own a bunch of these cars ranging from 2002 up to 2009 and it applies to all of them. Furthermore I disconnect the batteries on all of my cars every month when I travel away for work and once disconnected I then lock the car using the key and then unlock them again on my return a few weeks later and reconnect the battery.

If the key does not unlock the car it usually means that the physical connection between the lock and the latch is broken or has been fitted incorrectly which is easy to do if one is not careful. Or possibly the latch itself is broken but I have never encountered this.
Wow, so the folks that can't open with the key...I presume this means that something has come dislodged in the linkage or the lock needs lubrication.
 
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