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Hello everyone, Jennifer here in Houston.
I just purchased a 2008 “full size” beast. It’s beautiful aesthetically, though she has been stuck in maintenance for the last 10 days. Mind you I’ve only owned her for 11. On the drive to the dealer to sign the paperwork for the title, the truck died on me, followed by over heating and a bunch of warning indicators in the dash. Fingers crossed I didn’t make a big mistake in my purchase. Starting to wonder if the place I got it is ending up out of pocket more than what I paid for her.
my question is this:
What’s the difference is all the generations of this particular model? What are some common issues to be on the look out for? (Besides everything)
281834
 

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From what I have read on this forum the 2007 to 2009 years are pretty reliable but seems not in your case. I have owned a 2008 supercharged version for 2 years and have replaced one coolant hose and the AC compressor. The intermittent wipers don't work nor does the drivers side seat cooling but everything else works. The original owner had to install a new transmission which is a bit unusual I think. Good luck with yours.
 

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Did you obtain and review a carfax or similar prior to the purchase? How long has this vehicle been sitting at the dealer's. What is the current mileage? The answers to these questions might help steer in the right direction. I hope the dealer is covering the repairs.
 

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Guys if you read enough threads here, this forum is littered with owners of “new to them” Range Rovers who quite literally were left stranded on the way home from signing the papers. The buyer’s remorse must be unbearable. I was almost one of them. Mine just happened to last a few weeks before throwing repairs my way in excess of the monthly payment. The better part of a year gone by, I have not yet seen total repairs bested by total payments made at any point thus far.

I must commend the spirit of all of you, taking it on the chin with a grin. Accepting this as part of daily life as if you must, as it were your duty to drive a constant work in progress. I truly hope we all have domestics or Japanese vehicles sitting in the driveway, ready to go. I would not delegate a NEW, warrantied RR/LR as my daily driver. I would trust a 200k mi Jeep or Dodge on a cross country trip over a new RR. They tend to fail more gracefully.

I am happy for you in the sense that you dropped no more than $10k on your ‘08 (right???) and this wasn’t a $50k mistake. Fortunately you have good resources here to help you, and finding someone local to your area is a snap. We all walk the same journey and have a “no man left behind” policy. Someone has either already experienced your issue, or will soon, and you’ll be hearing about it. Let’s help OP out!


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Hi Jennifer. Nice to meet you on the forum. Like you I’m a fairly new owner of an 08. Mine is Supercharged though.

A rover owner on the forum that I might actually meet one day. I’m in Austin now but I have accepted a job offer to transfer to Houston and will be moving to the Woodlands or Spring area in the next month or two.


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Guys if you read enough threads here, this forum is littered with owners of “new to them” Range Rovers who quite literally were left stranded on the way home from signing the papers. The buyer’s remorse must be unbearable. I was almost one of them. Mine just happened to last a few weeks before throwing repairs my way in excess of the monthly payment. The better part of a year gone by, I have not yet seen total repairs bested by total payments made at any point thus far.

I must commend the spirit of all of you, taking it on the chin with a grin. Accepting this as part of daily life as if you must, as it were your duty to drive a constant work in progress. I truly hope we all have domestics or Japanese vehicles sitting in the driveway, ready to go. I would not delegate a NEW, warrantied RR/LR as my daily driver. I would trust a 200k mi Jeep or Dodge on a cross country trip over a new RR. They tend to fail more gracefully.

I am happy for you in the sense that you dropped no more than $10k on your ‘08 (right???) and this wasn’t a $50k mistake. Fortunately you have good resources here to help you, and finding someone local to your area is a snap. We all walk the same journey and have a “no man left behind” policy. Someone has either already experienced your issue, or will soon, and you’ll be hearing about it. Let’s help OP out!


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I'm a DIY mechanic and have entertained the idea of buying an L322 for years. I really love the classic lines of the last British designed Range Rover. The new ones are starting to show more and more Indian and now Chinese influence. I'm confident I could perform most repairs myself and actually enjoy working on my own cars. But I've not done it.

Because the one thing I cannot abide is a car that is more than likely going to leave me stranded somewhere at some point. I agree 100%, I don't think ANYONE should own an old Range Rover as their only vehicle, and they better have good Uber coverage in their area, as well as paid-up towing insurance (e.g. AAA) because towing one of these trucks won't be cheap. Also unless they have the tools, garage, skill, and desire to work on them themselves, or have a very fat wallet to pay others to do it for them, they have no business buying a used Range Rover.

Land Rover's business model is selling expensive NEW trucks to people seeking status. Their target market will own them for 3-4 years or however long their bumper to bumper warranty lasts and then sell them or trade them on another new vehicle. I think the L322s, especially the last couple of years of the range are probably the best of the lot.

They're very nice looking trucks with lots of nice amenities, and when they're running they're awesome. People can buy them for a small fraction of their cost new. This attracts people who can afford the relatively low price of admission, but probably can't or don't want to afford the very high cost to own and maintain them.
 

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On the bright side, it sounds like the selling dealer is paying for the fix, which is probably one reason it's taking them so long - no real incentive to complete the job.

I have over 200k miles on mine with minimal issues. Nearest LR dealer/service center is over 300 miles away, so I take mine to the local Ford dealer for service/maintenance, and they've been great. I've done some of the usual for the vehicle, like new front suspension airbags and changed transmission fluid, but other than regular oil changes, really nothing. I've learned a few things along the way - the last time the steering was aligned, they didn't recalibrate the steering angle sensor and my warning lights all lit up - but this is my daily driver and I regularly take long road trips (600-1000 miles each way) without worry or concern.
 

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Thank you all, as I fess to succumbing to that lure and curb appeal that these trucks exude. Ddm2k, you are quite accurate in what I paid for the truck. Just under $10k after TTL.
She’s still in the shop. As of Tuesday, I was told that parts are in “back order”, expected to arrive Friday with delivery of the truck to me Saturday. When I asked what exactly is being done, the guy (who is in sales) tells me he doesn’t really know but that person the mechanic it’s a bunch of sensor parts as well as some hose.
I failed to mention that when the truck crapped out on me, I took video and photos of the lights going off in the dash as well as a quick sneak video of the attempt to stay her up after being pushed out of traffic into a parking lot.

In further detail,a timeline of events:

Day 1:
arrived at lot, took the truckby myself on a 30 minute drive. Felt very smooth, shifted, braked, accelerated, suspension handled the Houston inner city pot holes without a single hiccup and aligned beautifully.
I noticed there was one warning light on. It was the tire pressure. I also saw a nail lodged in the front driver side tire. The dealer assured it would be handled. I ran the carfax which comes back clean, 3 owners, no accidents, no issues.
The odometer showed 134k at time of drive.
I put a deposit down on the truck, pending outside lender options as this place does not offer.

-
Day 2:
Loan secured but not funded yet. Dealer is ok with me picking up the truck to have my preference of mechanic look at.
(I ran out of time to have this done).
Keep the truck overnight. All still seems fine.

Day 3:
While driving to pick up my daughter from school, the charm is beginning to fade and engine seems sluggish. Having no knowledge of the bells and whistles, I chalked it up to needing to educate myself on what’s normal and what’s not, in these things.

Fifteen minutes after picking up my child, in a grocery store parking lot, the truck refuses to start up. It revs and revs when turning over the key to start, but refuses to do anything else.
Everything locks up, and warning lights that I’ve never seen start flashing like one of those gopher arcade games. “Now you see me, now you don’t.”

I try to start it again and this time it lowers up.Put it in reverse and start to back out when it dies again. Locks up, and blocks a few parked cars just because.
Luckily a few good Samaritans, through chuckles, pushed me back into my parking space.

I call the dealer and tell him and he tells me a flatbed will be there soon.
While waiting, I started it up one last time and this time no warning lights. Call the dealer and tell him I think we can make it home. He tells me to go ahead and get it home. That’s what I do.
Day 4:
Starts up but sluggishly, and I take my child to a doctors appointment, with a plan to take the truck to the dealer after.

About 20 minutes into the highway drive to the dealer to have the mechanic work on it and me to sign the title and registration documents, I notice the temperature gauge on the border of the hot zone. But it doesn’t stay there. Only when I would accelerate, the needle was in sync with the red zone. As soon as I’d let off the gas the needle would drop back into the safe temperature zone.
The truck doesn’t feel so good. Sluggish, struggling. Also, the gas gauge was not accurately displaying the range. One minute it shows 45 miles and the next it shows 50 and the next 20. All over the place. It had gas. I just put some in it.
About a mile from the dealer, while sitting at a red light during rush hour, it died again. This time, smoke began to come from under the hood.
Put the hazards on, called dealer who sends a couple of guys to me.
had the audacity to tell meit probably just needs gas. Right.Just some petrol and big hug.
No.
These guys put gas in it anyway, and it starts right up. They tell me they’re going to take it to the mechanic and will have Uber come get my 9 yr old and I and take us home or to the dealer.
I tell them no. I will drive it to the dealer and he can ride with me, because I know it’s not as easy as a fuel fix.
So we hop in, and drive a few blocks to the dealer, and it died again on us coming out of a stop sign. Lucky for them, there was no oncoming traffic or we’d all be dead.

since that day, the truck has been getting diagnosed and worked on.
 

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Thank you all, as I fess to succumbing to that lure and curb appeal that these trucks exude. Ddm2k, you are quite accurate in what I paid for the truck. Just under $10k after TTL.
She’s still in the shop. As of Tuesday, I was told that parts are in “back order”, expected to arrive Friday with delivery of the truck to me Saturday. When I asked what exactly is being done, the guy (who is in sales) tells me he doesn’t really know but that person the mechanic it’s a bunch of sensor parts as well as some hose.
I failed to mention that when the truck crapped out on me, I took video and photos of the lights going off in the dash as well as a quick sneak video of the attempt to stay her up after being pushed out of traffic into a parking lot.

In further detail,a timeline of events:

Day 1:
arrived at lot, took the truckby myself on a 30 minute drive. Felt very smooth, shifted, braked, accelerated, suspension handled the Houston inner city pot holes without a single hiccup and aligned beautifully.
I noticed there was one warning light on. It was the tire pressure. I also saw a nail lodged in the front driver side tire. The dealer assured it would be handled. I ran the carfax which comes back clean, 3 owners, no accidents, no issues.
The odometer showed 134k at time of drive.
I put a deposit down on the truck, pending outside lender options as this place does not offer.

-
Day 2:
Loan secured but not funded yet. Dealer is ok with me picking up the truck to have my preference of mechanic look at.
(I ran out of time to have this done).
Keep the truck overnight. All still seems fine.

Day 3:
While driving to pick up my daughter from school, the charm is beginning to fade and engine seems sluggish. Having no knowledge of the bells and whistles, I chalked it up to needing to educate myself on what’s normal and what’s not, in these things.

Fifteen minutes after picking up my child, in a grocery store parking lot, the truck refuses to start up. It revs and revs when turning over the key to start, but refuses to do anything else.
Everything locks up, and warning lights that I’ve never seen start flashing like one of those gopher arcade games. “Now you see me, now you don’t.”

I try to start it again and this time it lowers up.Put it in reverse and start to back out when it dies again. Locks up, and blocks a few parked cars just because.
Luckily a few good Samaritans, through chuckles, pushed me back into my parking space.

I call the dealer and tell him and he tells me a flatbed will be there soon.
While waiting, I started it up one last time and this time no warning lights. Call the dealer and tell him I think we can make it home. He tells me to go ahead and get it home. That’s what I do.
Day 4:
Starts up but sluggishly, and I take my child to a doctors appointment, with a plan to take the truck to the dealer after.

About 20 minutes into the highway drive to the dealer to have the mechanic work on it and me to sign the title and registration documents, I notice the temperature gauge on the border of the hot zone. But it doesn’t stay there. Only when I would accelerate, the needle was in sync with the red zone. As soon as I’d let off the gas the needle would drop back into the safe temperature zone.
The truck doesn’t feel so good. Sluggish, struggling. Also, the gas gauge was not accurately displaying the range. One minute it shows 45 miles and the next it shows 50 and the next 20. All over the place. It had gas. I just put some in it.
About a mile from the dealer, while sitting at a red light during rush hour, it died again. This time, smoke began to come from under the hood.
Put the hazards on, called dealer who sends a couple of guys to me.
had the audacity to tell meit probably just needs gas. Right.Just some petrol and big hug.
No.
These guys put gas in it anyway, and it starts right up. They tell me they’re going to take it to the mechanic and will have Uber come get my 9 yr old and I and take us home or to the dealer.
I tell them no. I will drive it to the dealer and he can ride with me, because I know it’s not as easy as a fuel fix.
So we hop in, and drive a few blocks to the dealer, and it died again on us coming out of a stop sign. Lucky for them, there was no oncoming traffic or we’d all be dead.

since that day, the truck has been getting diagnosed and worked on.
Please tell me this is not your only transportation.

They are beautiful beasts, and in my opinion, the L322s are the last cool looking Range Rovers. The interiors are opulent, and technology when functioning is great. But what you've experienced will happen again ...and again ...and again. And if you are going to have to pay to hire out the repairs, paying for tows, parts, and labor, it could get financially ugly fast. Not to mention inconvenient.

For none mechanics who want to own a Range Rover, just go lease a new one.

They're running a deal right now for qualified buyers for around $700-$1000 per month for 39 months. At the very least your running cost will be predictable and in the long run, you'll come out spending less, with your sanity intact. Land Rover will pay for any repairs, and all you have to worry about is gas. These trucks are the most dependable the first few years off the line.
 

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What dealer are you using in Houston?

I’ve heard the best one to go to is in The Woodlands. The one in Katy not so much. Don’t know about the one central or south.

These trucks aren’t so bad if they have been cared for. But if they have been abused or neglected then look out.

My 98 Discovery has been very reliable but I’m the original owner. My 02 RR bought used had seen better days.

My 08 is by far the best. Touch wood. The only thing that occasionally happens is the satellite radio will cut out near high power lines.


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What dealer are you using in Houston?

snip

These trucks aren’t so bad if they have been cared for. But if they have been abused or neglected then look out.

snip


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This is probably somewhat true. If you're lucky enough to find an L322 that has been continuously owned by the original owner, who obviously had the money to afford to buy it new, and probably had the money to maintain it. That has reliable service records. JUMP ON THAT UNICORN, if you're looking to own an L322.

But the truth is once these trucks have reached their 10 birthday, many of them will have had at least 2 or 3 owners, and some will have many more owners than that.

Typically the person who bought it new traded it around the end of its warranty period. The second owner got the truck for less than half what the truck cost new, but still probably paid a fairly high price for it. Giving it more than a good chance it received professional maintenance.

But by the third or fourth owner, the truck cost a small fraction of its initial cost, and with its handsome looks, it attracted the kind of buyer who could afford the cost of purchase but probably couldn't or didn't want to afford the cost of maintenance. This is where deferred maintenance really starts to build up.

At this point in the model's lifespan it's probably a good idea to try to find one for sale by an enthusiast DIY mechanic, who's kept good records. It's not going to be as reliable as other brands, but it'll be the most reliable a Land Rover can be.
 

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This is probably somewhat true. If you're lucky enough to find an L322 that has been continuously owned by the original owner, who obviously had the money to afford to buy it new, and probably had the money to maintain it. That has reliable service records. JUMP ON THAT UNICORN, if you're looking to own an L322.

But the truth is once these trucks have reached their 10 birthday, many of them will have had at least 2 or 3 owners, and some will have many more owners than that.

Typically the person who bought it new traded it around the end of its warranty period. The second owner got the truck for less than half what the truck cost new, but still probably paid a fairly high price for it. Giving it more than a good chance it received professional maintenance.

But by the third or fourth owner, the truck cost a small fraction of its initial cost, and with its handsome looks, it attracted the kind of buyer who could afford the cost of purchase but probably couldn't or didn't want to afford the cost of maintenance. This is where deferred maintenance really starts to build up.

At this point in the model's lifespan it's probably a good idea to try to find one for sale by an enthusiast DIY mechanic, who's kept good records. It's not going to be as reliable as other brands, but it'll be the most reliable a Land Rover can be.
Agreed for the most part.

But then I’m one that found that unicorn and paid a handsome premium for it with only 30k miles in 10 years by original owner. LR dealer even threw in a 3 year/36k mile warranty.

Original owner was Herb Simon of Simon Malls and owner of Indiana Pacers NBA team.




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Agreed for the most part.

But then I’m one that found that unicorn and paid a handsome premium for it with only 30k miles in 10 years by original owner. LR dealer even threw in a 3 year/36k mile warranty.

Original owner was Herb Simon of Simon Malls and owner of Indiana Pacers NBA team.




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lol, I guess so. You lucked upon a rainbow unicorn right there. 10 years and only 30k miles? That was just part of his fleet. Probably only used in that city, and obviously not very much.
 

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These trucks aren’t so bad if they have been cared for. But if they have been abused or neglected then look out.
I wish it were that simple. If it was, nobody would drive a lemon. The parts that fail on these Rovers often have no replacement schedule. They are either electronics, or considered a “lifetime” part. (Not mentioned on the owner’s manual maintenance schedule)

The difference seems to be that “lifetime” for any other brand is around 200k miles, and Land Rover thinks it means the lifetime of the factory warranty.


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A Range Rover is like any complicated machine. Look after it properly and it will look after you. I have come across many different top name brands with far worse reliability than Range Rovers including being badly let down by my own Toyota 4x4.

Its not about maintenance - its about who does the maintenance and how the maintenance is done. I agree that there are many very dodgy vehicles out there but one can not blame the brand. Blame the idiots who have looked after them.

I hear what is said about parts failing for no apparent reason but a large number of those failures are due to lack of maintenance or maintenance by inexperienced mechanics. I have lost count of the number of Range Rovers I have owned - somewhere around 40 over the years and have only been let down once. (every one was bought as a non runner or with major problems).
 

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A Range Rover is like any complicated machine. Look after it properly and it will look after you. I have come across many different top name brands with far worse reliability than Range Rovers including being badly let down by my own Toyota 4x4.

Its not about maintenance - its about who does the maintenance and how the maintenance is done. I agree that there are many very dodgy vehicles out there but one can not blame the brand. Blame the idiots who have looked after them.

I hear what is said about parts failing for no apparent reason but a large number of those failures are due to lack of maintenance or maintenance by inexperienced mechanics. I have lost count of the number of Range Rovers I have owned - somewhere around 40 over the years and have only been let down once. (every one was bought as a non runner or with major problems).
Like I said, we’re not talking about neglecting to follow the maintenance schedule. Chances are if someone is taking their vehicle to a mechanic, they can’t work on it themselves. So how in the world could the customer know how to effectively screen them? With your “blame yourself first” logic, it doesn’t seem like an owner would ever get to the point where they would question the mechanic, from all the introspection.

Tell me how lack of maintenance or choice of a mechanic causes an electronic module to fail? One that no fluids run through and it is not mounted on any mechanical assembly. It just sits high and dry (hopefully, right?) in the engine bay with a wiring harness connected to it. Sensors bring the data to it. If the module fails (not the sensors) this is due to a poorly made or defective part. Period.

Such events are never due to something the owner did or didn’t do, unless the module was physically damaged or compromised, in which case there would be clear markers indicating. Precariously placed controllers and electrical systems up by the cowl (where water intrusion can happen too easily) are not the fault of the owner. There is no neglect in failing to put a plastic bag over the module and change the cowl seal annually “just because”. That kind of prevention is not a reasonable expectation of a vehicle’s owner. Luxury or non.


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Huh? Following the maintenance schedule does not assure that a car has been well maintained. Taking the car to the most convenient or cheapest workshop is the problem.

Please elaborate on these module / controller /electrical system problems you mentioned. I changed an amplifier on a 2004 car once.
 

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Huh? Following the maintenance schedule does not assure that a car has been well maintained. Taking the car to the most convenient or cheapest workshop is the problem.

Please elaborate on these module / controller /electrical system problems you mentioned. I changed an amplifier on a 2004 car once.
CJB for the example pertaining to water intrusion. Others that fail for no apparent reason: EAS, RLCM, this one technically is attached to a pump but the ABS module.


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Never changed any of those modules or heard of any being changed apart from some cases where garages have thrown parts at a problem because they didn't know how to fix them. Not saying they cant fail but very rare if they do. Early BMW version L322's have been known to have ABS module problems but a very small percentage.

It seems that you have been unfortunate with your vehicle which is a pity. How long have you had the car and do you know who was doing the maintenance prior to your ownership?

I am intrigued by the CJB problem you had because its such a rare occurrence on these cars. They have been known to leak in the rear left compartment and if preventative maintenance is not done on the sunroof drains, water can enter the car which then soaks the carpets but the CJB is generally bullet proof.

But anyway this is a serious thread drift. We should have a separate thread.
 

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I'm a DIY mechanic and have entertained the idea of buying an L322 for years. I really love the classic lines of the last British designed Range Rover. The new ones are starting to show more and more Indian and now Chinese influence. I'm confident I could perform most repairs myself and actually enjoy working on my own cars. But I've not done it.

Because the one thing I cannot abide is a car that is more than likely going to leave me stranded somewhere at some point. I agree 100%, I don't think ANYONE should own an old Range Rover as their only vehicle, and they better have good Uber coverage in their area, as well as paid-up towing insurance (e.g. AAA) because towing one of these trucks won't be cheap. Also unless they have the tools, garage, skill, and desire to work on them themselves, or have a very fat wallet to pay others to do it for them, they have no business buying a used Range Rover.

Land Rover's business model is selling expensive NEW trucks to people seeking status. Their target market will own them for 3-4 years or however long their bumper to bumper warranty lasts and then sell them or trade them on another new vehicle. I think the L322s, especially the last couple of years of the range are probably the best of the lot.

They're very nice looking trucks with lots of nice amenities, and when they're running they're awesome. People can buy them for a small fraction of their cost new. This attracts people who can afford the relatively low price of admission, but probably can't or don't want to afford the very high cost to own and maintain them.
I wouldn't even call myself a diy mechanic and have replaced the brake lines through this forum and YouTube. I have replaced the overflow tank and performed other maintenance tasks. This vehicles need love and if you shoe them that will be reliable. Invest in a scan tool and all will be peachy
 
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