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Discussion Starter #1
Just picked up a 1987 Classic in a very cool copper orange color, realatively rust free with the exception of the outermost footwell on both sides. Seems to run well, spent the last two days cleaning, inspecting, and just plain staring at the beast. Put a full belt set on it, and I have surmised thus far that it needs shocks, brakes, and rear axle seals right away. Trans shifts fine, but the N/R/D shifts from standstill make a substantial clunk.
I plan to service the swivel housings and cv's asap. This is where the clunk seems to be coming from. I also need a new filler neck, as it looks like someone ripped off a locking cap at one point, and fuel finds it's way out when turning left.
Wish me luck, I really love this thing so far.
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

As the days have been passing, I have been doing a little digging here/cleaning there. I have discovered that the right rear caliper was missing all of the pad retaining hardware and had a bit of coat hanger dangling where one of the pins belongs. One of the pads was rotated in a fashion that had been allowing it to cut into the rotor like a can opener.

I have cleaned up the hoses that vent the crankcase and they smelled like the crustiest old bong you can imagine. Thumbs down. I also pulled the stepper motor and cleaned that up. Which leads me to a question, is the stepper motor a moving part? Should the plunger on the spring be moving in and out freely? It would unthread, now how much should the spring be compressed?

The transfer case was bone dry, and the drain plug will turn in both directions but does not come out or get tight. The trans was 2 or 3 quarts heavy, I drained and refilled. Waiting for a turn on the lift where a tech friend works to do the filter/flush.

The color that I like so much is a respray, used to be a burgundy kind of color, no big deal.
So far, love it. 12 mpg!
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

I thought the same thing about my stepper motor when i pulled it out.I went to get another one from the wreckers and it was the same didnt seem to move etc that must be how they are.My problem turned out to be MAF sensor anyway
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Most of us have been there . . . I went through a similar process a couple of years ago - details here ~ viewtopic.php?f=4&t=12794&p=83743#p83743

I've since discovered the easiest way is to check them is to have a spare, put the spare in the housing and leave the one you want to test connected where you can see it, and start the car, if it's OK it will move in and out (or out & in) when you turn it over.

Good Luck.

Alastair
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!


Well, this is it. I have not taken any more detailed pics, as cleaning 23 years of funk has been taking all of my free time with it. The cowl is banged up from the hood punching it, but it's just cosmetic. I have not searched the local junkyards yet, that is where I get stuff for most of my projects (aside from mechanical necessities that must be purchased new).
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Nice color.

Was wondering; have you had the hood off as the back part is raised above the scuttle panel?
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

custard pie feet said:
Nice color.

Was wondering; have you had the hood off as the back part is raised above the scuttle panel?
The hood and cowl are a mystery as to how they were damaged. There are no real marks on the hood, but it is pushed rearwards, which unstuck the adhesive on the bracing on the interior and really crunched the cowl (scuttle as you referred to it).
It is just cosmetic and the hood raises and latches properly, and the air still flows in as it should. I traded a 1988 Saab 900 turbo, and a Kawasaki dirtbike for this truck as I needed sturdy winter transportation and some room for people which my 2007 Jeep Wrangler has none. It is not factory paint, it used to be a burgundy color, but I like the copper. I plan to paint the roof white one of these days.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Boy you weren't kidding that is a "copper color". I've never seen anything like it. I have all kinds of stuff on my website and blog. Welcome to Range Rover.
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Very clean looking rangie, quite a cool looking color! My bonnet looked like that a while ago, it happened when the wind pushed it up to far, and bent the hinges, a fair bit of stuffing around bending them back but it's possible (there's no other alternative really). I'd be going over the car with a fine tooth comb, if they've used a coat hanger on the brakes, what about the grease in the bearings, cv oil, tie rod ends ..... it's probably been driven and driven and driven with no regards to mantainance. Some people deserve toyotas!
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Saw this one for sale thru the net a couple weeks ago. Congrats! Sweet color, even if it's not original. The only real thing troubling, that you've mentioned so far, is the bone dry xfer case. :shock: Hopefully it wasn't driven like that for too long. The rest can be easily worked through and hopefully you'll get many more miles out of her. :thumb: Welcome to the fray!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Slowly making progress on this thing. Belts, Optima, new positive lead to firewall, plugs, cleaning all the crud from the crankcase ventilation, cleaned the stepper motor, greased all the fittings, new steering stabilizer, etc... Seems to be running well, I've driven it all over the place but am limited to about 55-60 mph due to crap tires and shocks that may as well be ears of corn.
Still the CLUNK from the T-case, but there are different methods of keeping it subdued.
I have decided that I am just going to keep up the maintenance and not worry too much about things. Every old car I have had or do have has been treated like a baby and still I see folks driving the most rickety old buckets of crap that look as though they should have died years ago. Watching the old Camel Trophy stuff and numerous Youtube videos gives me hope as well. I do wish this thing was a manual diesel though :roll: .
Oh, and it really busts my hump that I can find every socket BUT the 2-1/16 that I need for my hubs, so that project has been put off for a few days. Shocks, front brakes, and tires are next.
I also like getting looks from the folks driving the new Range's. They know the Classic is sweet.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

You don't need a hub socket.
You can put the end of a screw driver on the edge of the nut and tap it with a hammer to loosen. I have a big set of channel locks that work just fine too.

Manual diesel, I second that. But sadly not in the Americas.

I've been doing brakes lately and blogging about it so you can read that at the blog. Have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Not so keen on that idea. I am going to hit the local flea market tomorrow and am fairly sure that I will find what I need. If not, I'll order the tool and some other bits from A/B, they would be to me by Tuesday. I'm too old and busy to fudge a nut up with that method, I'm sure I could make it happen, but I don't want to infuriate myself over it. I have read over all your stuff though, and appreciate all the effort you put into documenting your jobs.
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Very nice rover, I like the paint. I have a '87 that I am working on myself.
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Congrats the range is looking very good, love the color, very similar to the one used by GM, Sunset Orange Metalic.
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

Thanks for the color love. I like it as well. the cowl and the roof are shot, one due to complete clear coat fail, and the other due to a minor collision before I got it. I have seen the color on a few different newer vehicles, from Jeep JK's, to Honda Elements, to Chevy Avalanches.
 

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Re: New to the Range Rover, looking forward to picking brains!

MFND said:
Not so keen on that idea.
I understand completely. I wasn't either at first. But it was a simple fix at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Got shocks and my hub tool in the mail today! I have been holding off with spending any money, I just got rid of my Jeep and put my lovely wife in a new mini-van. But this weekend I will get the rear hubs and brakes all sorted out, and the next step is tires. I don't plan on much (real) off roading, so 225/75/16 BFG A/T's are what I plan to go with. After the big hit from the tires, I plan to get the front axle all buttoned up. I don't want to say the words out loud, but so far so good with the mechanicals and the electronics. Really like this rig.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What should be one of the most simple r/r jobs on a truck was absolutely ridiculous. The rears were easy as pie, until trying to put the cotter pin into the inner-most hole as indicated by the manual. I ended up clamping some vice-grips on the mount outside the washer, and using a large socket to tap them towards the frame to compress the bushing in far enough to slide the cotter in. Not that bad, but then I went to the other end of the vehicle.
What a user unfriendly way to mount shocks! Any job that requires multiple 1/4 turn, wrench flipping is crap. Is there a better way to remove the bottom nut?
On top of that, I'm pretty sure the shocks I removed have been on the vehicle since 1987. Two of the four upper nuts on the spring perch/mount were spinning, luckily some tension from leverage got them off. Unluckily, only one of those two would tighten back up. An angle grinder was employed on the upper nut of the unwilling right front.
Anyway, ride is fantastic now but now I can hear all of the other noises I need to fix. :doh:
 
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