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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Im having some over heating problems after putting in a new radiator.

I bought a 2008 4.4l NA Range Rover a little over a month ago. I brought the truck home and drove it on a number of long highway trips and all was well. In the garage one day when waxing the front bumper I saw that the radiator was seeping in the lower driver side corner. It was a very slow leak not even enough to noticeably bring the level down. I continued to drive the truck while waiting for the new radiator I ordered to arrive.

The new radiator arrived and I installed it. I bled the system which was a challenge but eventually got it flowing and had good heat. At idle the truck could run forever and never overheat but as soon as I drive it and accelerate it starts to overheat.

-Ive spent hours trying to bleed the system better
-I ordered a new expansion tank cap
-I put in a new thermostat
-I even ordered another radiator this time OEM just to be sure.
-Oil looks good
-I had it tested for exhaust in the antifreeze and it passed.

Nothing I do seems to make a difference, the truck ran and drove great before swapping out the radiator now it overheats under load and sometimes the heat cuts out when its overheating although not always. I haven't been driving the truck but I have been tinkering with it for weeks cant figure it out.

Any ideas on what could be causing overheating under load, what could have happened when swapping out the radiator?
 

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Heat cutting out and overheat on load is classic for still having air in the system. You don;t need to toss more money at the issue, just rebleed the system. Don;t forget that you have two bleed valves. If you do not follow the bleed procedure to the exact letter you will never get all the air out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks RRToadHall, Ive done quite a bit of bleeding though are there any specific steps you think Im missing?

Is there any place I can find very specific bleeding instructions? Ive probably cumulatively spent over 12 hrs trying to bleed the system better.

I get it to where the top bleeder seems to have a steady flow of liquid coming out.
Then I get the bleeder on the expansion tank to have a steady stream of liquid
Then I drive it and the air is back in system, heat gets weak, and its overheating. Ive never had such a hard time bleeding a coolant system.

Is there a common place where air would get into the system?
Could my water pump be weak? Or could exhaust be leaking by even though it passed the test for this?
Can anyone direct me to specific bleeding instructions?
 

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Directions are the the shop shop manual. Link for the shop manual is in the FAQ stickie for this forum section. Most people only use the bleed valve at the coolant tank. There is a primary bleed valve under the engine cover. You MUST follow the bleed procedure to the letter.

I seriously doubt you have a head gasket issue. If she was running fine with none of these issue prior to the replacement there is no reason to expect anything but air in the system which of course means low coolant and not being able to come up to pressure.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I concur that these are difficult beasts to bleed. I have found that bleeding on my driveway which has somewhat of a steep incline and holding the engine at around 1.5-2 RPM significantly helps is clearing the airlocks..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the feedback!

I'll try doing this again exactly as the manual says following the steps and on steep incline. I feel like I must be missing something after putting so many hours into this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi All,

So I carefully bled coolant system again on my Range Rover and things were looking up. I went out for a drive and drove all around town with the obd computer hooked up the hottest I saw was 205. I drove quite a bit with no trouble but kept the heat off.

Things went South when I turned up the heat. As soon as I turned on the heat the temperature started rising.

Could there still be air in the heater core?
Why would it only get hotter than 205 and start over heating once the heat is turned on?
Is there a better way to bleed the heater core specifically?
 

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Well since the heat should have been on high during the bleed process it should be air free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The heat was on high during the bleeding process and we followed the instructions in the manual shared here. I'm at a loss now it's so odd to me that the truck went from working perfectly to chronic over heating. Since the new radiator its only been driven around town on test drives where the temp was carefully watched.

What underlying problems could cause air to get into the coolant system?

Head gasket?
Slipped cylinder sleeve?
Weak water pump?
Any ideas?
 

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I park uphill in my driveway with the engine off and cool, disconnect the upper radiator hose where it connects to radiator and pour fluid into the hose until a little fluid pours out of the top of the radiator. Reconnect the hose and the little line running to the expansion tank you removed to get to the radiator hose connection. Then make sure the expansion tank is at the proper level and your done. 10 years this has worked every time.

My system is sensitive to the level so I do this every 3 months or so to top off. The expansion tank will show level as fine but the radiator is only half full.

side note: when you are pouring the fluid down the hose it goes in slowly because its flowing back through the tiny hole in the thermostat so be patient and keep topping off the hose until it runs out of the radiator.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Per chance did you ever add coolant leak stop?
That crap can gunk up the works horribly. Not sure how different a P38 heater core is. But if your heater core is old it could be clogged. I’d pull it and check for free flow. Maybe install a new one if it is not to difficult or expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi All,

After not being able to bleed the truck I brought it too a 2nd mechanic. The 2nd mechanic tried to bleed and and ran some tests. This mechanic says he found exhaust in the coolant when he tested the first mechanic could not find exhaust in the coolant.

I was really hoping this was going to be a good truck but it only lasted me a few months. Looking like this was my first and last Land Rover product, too fragile build quality just doesn't seem to be there, it was nice when it worked though.

He says:
1. Bad headgasket
2. Cracked block
3. slipped sleeve

I was pretty disappointed to hear this especially since it was working fine until the new radiator was installed. Im not sure how the truck went from working to this, I pampered it and never over heated in the few months I owned it. If he is finding exhaust gases in the radiator I guess thats that.

Is it possible that fixing the small seep in the radiator increased system pressure and uncovered this problem?
 

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2010 SC 5.0 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I would be okay paying to fix a bad head gasket but Im afraid I'll do that only to find out that wasn't the problem because block is cracked or a cylinder lining slipped.


Is there any way to tell if the head gasket is bad or if its a cracked block or slipped cylinder lining?
How common/likely is a cracked block?
How common/likely is a cylinder lining slipping?
 

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at this point you have a choice,
put in K seal and drive it,
OR pull the heads and see if it has cracks,
I would see if the k seal works first as its the least expensive way to restore operation
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The truck is a 2008 4.4 NA in excellent condition. Picture below such a shame to write the truck off. I don't think I would ever be comfortable driving it with Kseal feels like a bandaid that could rip off at any point.

I only use this truck for occasional weekend ski trips but the trips are typically 2 or 3 hrs into the mountains so I need it to be very reliable.

I'd rather spend the money to do a head gasket and get the piece of mind.

Is there a way to rule out cracked block or slipped cylinder lining?
Is there any other way exhaust gases could get in the coolant?

IMG_20171029_141419.jpg
 

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Has the truck ever pushed coolant out of the overflow tank when it is hot, or does the coolant just keep disappearing? You can get your own test kit for checking for combustion gas in the antifreeze from autozone, they will rent you the tool, you just need to buy the test fluid. Its not a tough test to do, thing looks like a giant syringe, except it has a rubber donut to seal to your expansion tank, and a ball you pump. You just suck the air off the top of the expansion tank when the engine is hot and pass the air thru a test cylinder and if it changes from blue to yellow it has combustion gasses in it. As far as telling how it got in there (if its there) that basically would require a teardown. If it was really bad you may be able to pressurize the coolant side and visually look for leaks in the cylinders with one of those small inspection cameras inserted thru the spark plug holes. You also may be able to narrow it down to a specific cylinder by looking at the spark plugs. A spark plug exposed to antifreeze will get steam cleaned and will be cleaner than those that have not been.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If I open the bleeder on the reservoir it will push fluid out. The truck never loses fluid there are no fluid leaks and oil is clean. The truck runs smooth and accelerates nicely without missing a beat no signs of power loss or compression issues.


The truck will run at the right temp forever if I just let it sit and idle, it over heats as when I start driving around and accelerating, if it gets hot and I pull over it cools right down.

As soon as I start accelerating it seems like the system gets air in it but fluid only comes out if I crack the bleed valve. If I over heated it Im sure fluid would come out on its own like any car but Ive never let it get that hot.

I'll try testing for exhaust gases on my own two mechanics have checked now one found exhaust in the anti freeze and the other did not.


Are there any possible signs of a slipped lining our cracked block like engine skipping or anything?
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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NH911,

do not put any chemicals in the cooling system, let us goo back to beginning, car was running well and no problems what so ever, that is till you noticed small leak in the radiator. Change radiator and now car is overheating. Common sense dictates that only plausible case is air in the system. there is no cracked block, slipped lining etc... Flush the system again, tray using vacuum to pull coolant trough. DO NOT put Kseal in. and (you may lough) she likes to be talked to.:thumb:

.
 

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You are describing Classic and P38 engine issues. It is physically impossible to have a perfectly running AJ engine with no over heat only to have it fail after a simple radiator replacement. You are not going to crack a block on an AJ unless you have left a massive overheat out of this thread. AJ don't have slipping liners.... then again neither did P38s but they sure have a massive urban legend for it. :mrgreen:

The early AJ engine are as close to bullet proof as anything you can find. they are very forgiving, easy to maintain and last ages. I simply can NOT see this as a full catastrophic failure.

Head gasket is a stretch, but not totally unheard of. In your case I can;t wrap my head around a sudden head gasket failure. Sadly if one test showed exhaust gases I would go down that path. The engine has to be running quite awhile for exhaust gasses to finally register in coolant. It takes a lot of running hours and you would be seeing clouds of white smoke out of the exhaust if this were huge head gasket breech. If this is the very beginning of a failure you would see minor overheat, perhaps no white condensation out the exhaust and even minimal or unnoticed coolant drop. If you have a minimal registration of exhaust in the coolant... then it was caught early. It's just that AJ head gasket failures are very rare. I honestly never gave that a thought the start of this thread. Your symptoms do point to a head gasket failure, but with the timing of empty coolant it is almost always a bleeding issue. I offer many apologies.

I am not sure how techy your are, but if you start pulling spark plugs you would see one... or two adjacent that are "steam cleaned". This early on it may be only a slight difference in comparison to other cylinders.. That will be where the head gasket would be failing. It's kind of a corn ball way to check for coolant breach, but it works. With a positive test for gasses it kind of adds up.

This is not in any way a sign of an unreliable girl to be left behind. She's just having a bit of a midlife glitch and needs to get a bit of help with the therapist. She will be good for another 100K miles after repairs with proper maintenance and a bit of spoiling. You don't have the fears of timing chain guides like the 2010s and up. You have rock solid engine known and proven across several LR models for reliability. i don't know how many miles she has but she looks incredible. I hope you have the gaskets done so she can stay in the family.

if your Rover is not a she... and is a he I apologize. :lol:
 
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