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Discussion Starter #1
Title says it all. I have been having problems with this driver's side wheel overheating. It is definitely the brake rotor that heats up. New calipers on both sides brought no relief. Does that mean master cylinder? Does anyone rebuild these? Other ideas of what's wrong? It started when I spent a day off roading and got components wet, muddy and worked the ABS/traction system hard.

I did notice when replacing calipers & bleeding lines that the system constantly bleeds some fluid all the time. Not sure if that indicates a fault.

Also, the transmission never sounded right after I put dextron 6 in it. Any info/advice on that would be appreciated. It calls for Dextron III Mercon and I was told Dextron 6 is a compliant replacement for that. Yet it whines loudly ever since that drain & fill occurred.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Another thought, is the front rotor expanded because it overheated? That doesn't sound right.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I was wondering about d6. I am going to talk to my trans guy. But when you did the pads did you grease up the pins because I just redid my brakes and the pins were bone dry, not great for movement
 

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yep, caliper pins makes sense - and if they were dry, and mud dried in there, then that'll be one problem. The brake system should not be losing fluid though, but I suppose that is unrelated
 

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The pads are dragging because they aren't retracting properly. Cleaning the pins and caliper might help but you might need to refresh the calipers. Eventually the bores get gummed up and the piston don't return well. You can get replacement seals. But I would fix the leak first.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
yep, caliper pins makes sense - and if they were dry, and mud dried in there, then that'll be one problem. The brake system should not be losing fluid though, but I suppose that is unrelated
Remember that I just replaced the calipers after the off-roading, in case this was the issue. My calipers are new (re-manufactured). They look like this now.
IMG_3384.JPG

I remember seeing that the pins were pre-greased. They slid well. Surprisingly, the issue still existed after installation of these shiny beauties.

If the brake system should not be losing fluid, I meant when I open the bleed valve, fluid leaks out even when I am not pressing the brake. This may imply brake force is being applied at all times - I don't know. That's why I am casting around for ideas, because generally people know more than I do... Thanks for any thoughts

I do not see master cylinders for sale... wish this issue could be resolved, my car is off duty for 8 months now...
 

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Brake fluid will dribble out if you open the bleed nipple due to gravity, the reservoir is higher than the caliper. But it won't have any pressure behind it so won't be applying the brake. It isn't a simple master cylinder on these but an ABS modulator. They are available but not cheap https://www.lrdirect.com/STC2778-Booster-Unit/ for up to 98 with 2 wheel traction control or https://www.lrdirect.com/SXC100010-Booster-Abs/ for later cars with 4 wheel traction control.
 

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Sorry, missed the new caliper part. I would say you need to bleed your system especially since you probably put new fluid in since you replaced the calipers. As Richard says, this isn't your garden variety braking system design. The procedure is a little different, read RAVE and follow it step by step and you might need to do more than once.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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internally collapsed brake hoses, when brake is applied they expand and allow fluid to push thru, as brake is released the pressure on the hose remains static and keeps the caliper applied. since the system does not have release pressure your caliper locks up.
replace brake hoses, from caliper to pipe connection.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you 95classic, I drove past my neighborhood brake shop owned by a Somali guy. He is happy and now rich because he has sold his shop to developers. Anyway, he gave me the same advice. "100 percent sure the hoses are the problem" he says. He said if I can do calipers, I should be able to do hoses no problem. We shall see. Thanks again. Tonight I learned that DOT4 fluid is flammable and the exhaust manifold has sufficient temperature to ignite it and retain a small fire. The P38 has truly been dramatic and interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Obligatory update. After nearly 10 months, crippling the vehicle, the dragging has been cured. The hoses were the fix. The new calipers and pads up front were just a bonus for the loyal P38. Also the DOT 4 flush throughout was very needed. A radiator flush is likely needed. Oh, I noticed the coolant tank is bubbling when i rev the engine. Head gasket? Cheers
 

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Oh, I noticed the coolant tank is bubbling when i rev the engine. Head gasket? Cheers
Probably not. As it hasn't been used you've probably got a slight leak somewhere so the coolant level has dropped (did you have to top it up?), so now there is air in the passages in places. Revving the engine is just pushing the air out just as the system is designed to do.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Also regarding the bubbling in the header tank when running... the return from the throttle body heater plate/top of the inlet manifold comes up at the front corner of the header tank - so sometimes when it's running and the coolant is coming in through there, it looks like it's bubbling up from the pressure of it coming back into the header tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Marty, thanks, interesting point. I did do the heater plate gasket earlier this season. The exhaust has been smelling of coolant and it did lose some, particularly when the heater plate gasket was leaking. I bought some of the K-Seal stuff and put it through. I also put the heater on high to make the heater core circulate the stuff. I plan to flush the system and get the K-seal out soon. The engine was also missing when cold, perhaps a telltale sign of coolant getting into one cylinder. I became suspicious enough that I took the risk of employing the K-seal.
 
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