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04RangeRover said:
...I am not concerned at all about the option of adjustable height, as I will never go offroading with this car. I am not concerend about loss of value, because I have no plans of selling this vehicle, but I am concerned about minimzing maintenance costs, therefore springs is a good option for me.

1. My main concern is the ride quality, how much stiffer will the ride be, and keep in mind my Range Rover has 24" wheels installed ?
2. I have noticed that there are few companies offering coil conversion, which one would you guys recommend between Strutmasters, Atalantic British and Arnott.
3. Will Coil springs substantially affect the handling of the vehicle.
4. I have noticed that some of the coil kits come with a new set of front end struts, some don't and require reusing your old struts, which one would you guys recommend.
Gary, I would only make the switch if I planned to make the car a second car and/or dedicated offroad/hunting/etc. vehicle. You will destroy the street ride. BMW performed one of the greatest feats of automotive engineering in creating a true offroad capable vehicle that would still be a pleasure to drive, even for BMW/P-car enthusiasts as many of us are.

If you do the conversion, get the struts that are designed to work with the springs.
 

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YES i feel the same way and i replace both front struts and now the truck is struck in the air in the front it must be the EAS and not going to fix it Air Suspension Conversion Kit is the way to go because you are going to have one problem after another!!!! THIS IS MY FOURTH A Air Suspension PROBLEM on my 03 RR the only thing getting "castrated" is my pockets LOL . So this time I'm NO MORE!! Air Suspension Conversion Kit what I'm doing, take it me I got my 03 back in 05 not worth it you will have one problem after another ......:D
 

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I have to disagree. The L322 has a few known issues with the EAS, so yeah, plan on replacing the front struts about every 100k or so(this can easily be extended by lowering the vehicle when parked) The rears tend to last quite a bit longer then the fronts, but all rubber will eventually wear out.

But the rest of the system is usually ok. Compressors do fail, but are actually pretty robust until a leak is left unattended, which will cause them to over-run.

Height sensors go bad, but far from a common issue, and they're pretty simple and relatively cheap to replace.

Valve blocks are a pretty uncommon failure point, but it does happen, I might have replaced a handful since these trucks were on the showroom floor.

If you take into consideration the cost of a proper conversion(including shocks and struts, as the ride quality is horrible if you don't, vastly different spring rates between coils of steel and a bag of air) and take out the cost of a set of front struts, and even throw a compressor in for good measure, I think you'll come out no less then even, and have a far superior ride, which is the one thing that really sets this vehicle apart from everything else on the road.

I will make a note, that until the day I got rid of it, my old P38 had fully functional EAS, with just about every component in the system either replace or rebuilt by me at some point of my ownership, and that truck does not have nearly as good of a system as the L322, so I may just be a sucker for EAS.

That said, what exactly is your issue illstreet? Did the front raise way up right after replacing the front struts?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Not to resurrect an age-old debate of air vs coils but long term what have people's experiences been with coils on the L322? Specifically the atlantic british kit that looks like it adds a 1" lift (but unfortunately requires use of the original strut) - Range Rover Suspension Kits: Air Suspension To Coil Spring Conversion Kit

I see that many people are swapping coils for air on the LR3 and LR4 especially as these trucks get over 150k miles and are becoming dedicated trail rigs and running full-time lifts with oversized tires. It looks like the kits available for the LR3 and LR4 have Old Man Emu springs, a new strut assembly, and are basically bolt-on with no disassembly of the original air strut which seems like a much better kit than the one available for the L322.

I love the air suspension when its working and replace my bags every 75k but I have ran into issues of random fault codes resulting in inactive air suspension (faulty sensors) and the beloved "bump stop ride" due to an overheated compressor. I think as my rig gets up there in miles (165k+ and counting) Im interested in swapping to coils if the ride was tolerable with the added reassurance that im not going to blow an airbag on a trail in SE Oregon, Interior BC, or Baja (100 miles from civilization). I would love to be able to run oversized tires without the worry of the rig going onto bump stops and destroying the wheel well components.

As others have pointed out solid rear axle simulation will be gone and there will be decreased rear articulation. Also something that would be lost that is huge for me is the inability to self-level for overlanding camping sites. I have pulled up to many remote camping sites that are very uneven and simply been able to pull out my IIDtool and self-level the rig for a nice flat camping setup by increasing/decreasing the height on each individual air spring.

What do you guys think? Are these coils a good option for the reassurance in the backcountry and running oversized wheels or is this more of an LR3/LR4 thing?
 
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