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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys, names is Gary, first time posting here, although I have researched and found a lot of great information about our cars before.
I have a 04 Range Rover HSE, and YES the day has come and I got me Air Suspension Inactive message. It looks like its the front left end, thats kissing the ground. I am seriously considering Coil Conversion, I have tried to do my research here, but still have unanswered questions.

I am not concerned at all about the option of adjustable height, as I will never go offroading with this car. I am not concerend about loss of value, because I have no plans of selling this vehicle, but I am concerned about minimzing maintenance costs, therefore springs is a good option for me.

1. My main concern is the ride quality, how much stiffer will the ride be, and keep in mind my Range Rover has 24" wheels installed ?
2. I have noticed that there are few companies offering coil conversion, which one would you guys recommend between Strutmasters, Atalantic British and Arnott.
3. Will Coil springs substantially affect the handling of the vehicle.
4. I have noticed that some of the coil kits come with a new set of front end struts, some don't and require reusing your old struts, which one would you guys recommend.

Thank you guys for any advice, I do really appreciate it, as I am lost in between all the options here.
 

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Unlike the P38 and Classic, the MKIII are independent suspension, using cross air pressure/bleeding to simulate a solid axle. I know you are not going off road, but I have talked to several that did this conversion, and went back due to the poor ride and performance. I would not do this, unless you just cannot afford to fix the Air. You are taking a wonderfully designed suspension and totally hacking it up.

Very easy, and not to expensive to replace your bad air spring.
 

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and against many of the poorly informed rumours it is entirely possible to replace just the air bladders on a MarkIII. Perhaps if you give us more information as to why you want to castrate your Rangie we may be able to better help you avoid such a dreadful act.
 

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Coil conversion on the MKIII is a hideous idea. At least that's my opinion. Replacing your airstrut is not expensive at all; especially if you go the Arnott route. It ends up costing you only $350 for the reman airstrut and it comes with a lifetime warranty. If you keep your car serviced at the right intervals and change parts that are about to run their course or have already done so, on time, you won't have much to worry about with these cars. Remember they run on the BMW M62 motor.... Suit yourself, but one thing to keep in mind is that the coil will end up being an expensive mistake if you decide to come running back to the air suspension.

P.S. I know a thing or two about replacing the airstruts as I just replaced both front left and right on my '04 just last month (August 2011) and I couldn't be happier. Just the peace of mind if nothing else.......
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I want to castrate my rangie, simply because I want to minimize future maintenance costs. I am sure that if i buy both new bags for the front, sooner or later they are gonna go bad again, and im sure sooner or later the rear ones are gonna go bad too, then the air compressor is gonna go bad, and then some sensors. I simply want to spend the money once and be done with it, not worry if i am gonna get stuck on the highway if i take a long trip. And of course i want to minimize the amount of money i spend on the car.
 

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EAS is a wear item just like brakes and tyres. It is part of what makes a Rangie a Rangie. To castrate your rig is simply short sighted in long term costs. You may as well skip every other oil change to save money and ignore the brake pad warning until you are metal on metal... that'll save money as you could squeeze out a couple of hundred extra miles.

Seriously, maintain your rig properly or go buy something more in keeping with your perceived budget.
 

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Why buy a R.R. in the first place if your going to wreck it. Sell it and buy something you will be happy with. Or fix air bags the way it was designed. That my take on it anyway
 

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04RangeRover said:
I want to castrate my rangie, simply because I want to minimize future maintenance costs. I am sure that if i buy both new bags for the front, sooner or later they are gonna go bad again, and im sure sooner or later the rear ones are gonna go bad too, then the air compressor is gonna go bad, and then some sensors. I simply want to spend the money once and be done with it, not worry if i am gonna get stuck on the highway if i take a long trip. And of course i want to minimize the amount of money i spend on the car.
Then 1)Why did you post this if you want to castrate your truck, and 2)Why on earth did you buy one of the most complex trucks ever made if you are worried about maint cost? Don't get me wrong on this one, I am too, but I change my oil every 5k, flush cooling sys every30K, replace all belts hoses every 60K, flush trans every 30K etc etc. You are trying to change one of the most wonderful designs that are part of this truck, when maybe you should be putting time and money into other areas. None of the air susp components that would typically fail are that expensive. The air springs from what I see are good for around 100K, I don't think thats to bad.....

Good luck with whatever you decide...
 

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I don't know why there is the perception that coil springs are just set it and forget it item. You still need to maintain those things, they can break and wear out just like anything else. My front air struts lasted nearly 8 years, that doesn't seem bad to me, replacement was relatively painless, and I only paid about $550 for both sides if I remember correctly. I've replaced broken coil springs on other vehicles that weren't 8 years old yet. Granted, the EAS stuff is a bit more money, but DIY really isn't bad at all, and the ride quality is great.

And if you think driving around with a leaky air spring is bad, try listening to the racket that a broken coil spring makes!
 

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I think we are all being a bit harsh here and this subject always seems to raise everyones heckles. I have owned range rovers for many years, classic, p38's etc and I can understand why the OP is concerned. It is nothing to do with owning a car out of his means it is simply that people can gett P&*%ed off with a vehicle that can have so many software and hardware faults. I understand that the air suspension is a thing of wonder but that doesnt help when your 300 miles from home truddling along on the bump stops. I know the arguement that the systems should work if maintained properly but I also understand the arguement that if you look on this forum you will see countless incidents when faults have nothing to do with maintance and are related to sensor failures, damp, the battery, the infamous leaks etc etc etc....

That can become wearing. If the OP has bought the car because he likes the look, the interior , the engine or even the shape of the wheels then thats his feelings and he is welcome to them. He doesnt have to like the air suspension and if he doesnt then he is perfectly entitled to change it. after all part of the fun in being a rich guy with your trousers so full of money that you can buy a range rover is its your car so you can do what the hell you like with it! Systems are only as good as their reliablity for many owners and to some owners this one is not that good.

As for coil springs ..sure they fail ... but in every RR I have had that hade springs they never have but my L322 has had two 'air susp inactive' in 9 months! Thats fine I use it as a second car but for some people that isnt fine and isnt good enough.

o4rangerover...as for your questions well Im sorry i dont know because I havnt converted mine. I have stuck with the air springs and am seeing a good divorce lawyer....

I dont see it as castrating the car as that sounds a bit over the top..changing the engine for a smart car one would be castrating it but the sir suspension wont make it talk in a high voice.

What ever you do good luck.

:wink:
 

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furthur to above bear in mind that Arnott themselves say on their site ;- Enjoy your Range Rover without worrying about failing air suspension parts, leaving you stranded with expensive and recurring maintenance problems. Our comprehensive kit allows you to convert the entire vehicle for less than the price of one air strut at your local dealership.

and they sell the air springs as well!... now if the company who sell the air springs say that then what hope does 04rangerover have in being confident!

:lol:
 

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He asked for opinions/advice on this, and he got em. Now are you saying that we should not give our opinions?

I have a 95 Classic, and yes I converted it to coils, and still have mixed feelings about this. But that is a solid axle truck, the MKIII is not. That would be my concern that I would spend a lot of time researching the impact to the handling/suspension performance/safety due to the independent susp (is air added to a spring in the turn to increase stability, therefore allowing the use of smaller sway bars, is the control arm geometry designed for the air, anything else designed for the air). This is what would scare/concern me, that I would make sure I knew the answers. Not saying this IS a problem, but I would make darn sure before I spent the money and time.

It's his truck, I really don't care what he does. Just offering advice as he requested....
 

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Yes, I can understand it would be frustrating to be stuck on bump stops due to some software malfunction, but as long as you physically maintain the EAS system, a mere software glitch should take only a few seconds to resolve if you have one of the various gadgets which are available for reasonable prices. I've reset my faults a handful of times. Maybe your pump could fail without warning but if the system is well maintained, it would take more than just that to leave you on bump stops assuming you replace the pump within a couple weeks (possibly more, since the struts should stay inflated as long as you don't do something to cause air to be released).
 

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This is my 2 cents, i own a repair shop in Atlanta so i have driven many 03 on Range Rovers with converstions. The problem with the converstion is the vehicle was never designed for springs so the ride is not good after converting, also the front springs have no damper between the strut and body so all the spring noise is transfered into the cabin which is very noisy when going over bumps. When the eas system does fail (which it will) 99 times out of 100 the eas fault message comes up and unlike the p38 the veh does not drop to the bump stops
 

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He asked for opinions/advice on this, and he got em. Now are you saying that we should not give our opinions?

Im not saying that and everyone is welcome to his opinion. i just dont think its constructive to infer that he is trying to run a car beyond his means, suggest that he doesnt bother changing the oil and cook the engine to save money because he is some sort of skin flint, or infer the general sense that if he is going to do what he intends he might as well set fire to the car and Pi*@ on a portrait of the queen while he is at it.

opinions such as are they more noisy, do they spoil the ride and how etc are all valuable just not what seems to be assumptions and almost religous zeal.

My point also stands that the system does have faults and what this poster is suggesting is to simply remove those faults by choosing an alternative. I havnt felt the need to change mine but then again that may change if it continues to annoy me. correction continues to annoy Mrs P by displaying messages at her and not working.

:naughty:
 

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finlander said:
He asked for opinions/advice on this, and he got em. Now are you saying that we should not give our opinions?

Im not saying that and everyone is welcome to his opinion. i just dont think its constructive to infer that he is trying to run a car beyond his means, suggest that he doesnt bother changing the oil and cook the engine to save money because he is some sort of skin flint, or infer the general sense that if he is going to do what he intends he might as well set fire to the car and Pi*@ on a portrait of the queen while he is at it.

opinions such as are they more noisy, do they spoil the ride and how etc are all valuable just not what seems to be assumptions and almost religous zeal.

My point also stands that the system does have faults and what this poster is suggesting is to simply remove those faults by choosing an alternative. I havnt felt the need to change mine but then again that may change if it continues to annoy me. correction continues to annoy Mrs P by displaying messages at her and not working.

:naughty:
agreed....

If you actually own and drive a 935 on the street, that is very impressive....those were incredible race cars.
 

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I've seen the guys on this board (me included) referred to as 'EAS nazis'... :lol:

I think part of the prob is tho, that many of us have worked our way through EAS problems - and come to realize that the EAS is actually pretty simple. The bad rep stems from LR's ridiculous parts & labor prices as much as from any sort of probs. And once you've realized this you want to pass the message on.

The EAS is a low maintenance item. It needs service every 5-8 years and that's the long and short of it. And if you source the parts at the right places, its inexpensive to keep up too.

All 4 airsprings can be had for the cost of a coil conversion kit and labor to install is less. And you will not be improving the RR's suspension with coils - certain extreme applications excepted. And fear is a silly reason to swap to coils.

I do agree, tho, that derogatory comments do not help the fatherl... cause.

Heil EAS
 

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Well said. I think if you read past the hyperbole, this is basically what all the threads on this subject always boil down to.
 

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If you actually own and drive a 935 on the street, that is very impressive....those were incredible race cars.

I did own one....it was a GP motersports 935 turbo built for the owner of the company.Based on the 935 blue coral race car built by gpmotor sports it was modified for street use. ... it was abosolutly amazingly fast with the 930 turbo blueprinted engine.

You notice i say was!!!! the car was sold last febuary on the arrival of our first born a lovely baby girl to pay for my wifes year off from work... I got £45000 for it and that was divided up into Mrs P's baby account and the rest went towards the new vogue.

still eliza was worth it :p
 
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