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I have a 2002 that the navigation screen is completely white and the radio will not work properly as if the navigation unit is taking over the sound (only rear speaker come on and column cannot be adjusted) - this happens only when key is turned and navigation screen comes on. If I didn’t have the key turned and only have the radio on, everything is fine. I tried taking out the fuse that controls Nav unit, audio works fine then. I thought the navigation screen is the culprit so I bought a replacement but it is doing the same thing (front speakers muted and volumb cannot he adjusted). What do you think is causing this?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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You are on the right track. Possibly being caused by the nav Unit........The other one....The DVD Drive and brains located in the rear RH side. I seem to recall the switching is accomplished there. Could have been a bad screen as well.
 

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Bolt has hit the nail on the head!
White screen is usually an indication of failure of the Nav unit itself (in RH side loadspace). One of its weaknesses is that if power to it is disconnected/ interrupted before it has finished its closedown/ storage (takes a minute or two) when the car is turned off it will be irreparably damaged.
Most common cause of this is by following the RAVE instructions (reproduced below so you know what NOT to do) for correctly disconnecting the cars battery! If you've got Nav fitted, make sure all activity lights on the Nav unit in loadspace have gone out before disconnecting battery.

BATTERY
Service repair no - 86.15.01
NOTE: From ’96 MY, vehicles maybe fitted with a back-up battery, the purpose of which is to power the anti-theft alarm if the main battery is disconnected. If the main vehicle battery is to be removed it is essential to adopt the following procedure before disconnecting the terminals in order to prevent the alarm sounding:
1. Turn the starter switch ’on’ and then ’off’.
2. Disconnect the battery WITHIN 17 SECONDS (if the battery is not disconnected within 17 seconds, the alarm will sound).


Anyway, if you can find a good replacement control CD unit, that should solve your problem.
For information, using Marty's brilliant pinout info for the Premium stereo wiring, the Nav Mute line details are as follows. Disconnecting this line should remove the mute signal from the system
navmute.JPG
 

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If mine packs up, I’d be looking at changing the system to something a bit more updated.
i know we all try to keep as original as poss, but the sat nav system in these is so outdated, I use my phone rather than the nav system
 

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The last couple of wrecks I have visited in the yards had DVD drives in them, so not a popular pull out item. I think they go for 20 bucks as a "Radio"
Outdated?? Oh, I don't know....... I think "James" is quaint. If you consider when it was introduced, and just what it can actually do, using a DVD drive, it is amazing that it works at all!
Aside from a tendency to place me on toll Motorways when I wish to avoid them, it is cool. Very clumsy input screen, but, as I said, It works!.........Heck, Nowadays, it would be called Retro!
Mind you, I also have my trusty Navman to stick on the windscreen as a back up:thumb:
 

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It's that retro Bolt, it's not even DVD driven- it's CD based `)
 

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Jeremy Clarkson is on YouTube trying to use the RR nav system. Pretty funny.
I don't ever use the one in my 2008 even though I paid for a "new updated DVD". Can't find roads that have been in place for years. James voice is cool though.
 

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It gets better than a few missing roads........For those not aware, Hawaii has 6 main Islands, 3 of which even have inappropriately named "Interstate" Highways.
This was obviously taught on a day the LR folks skipped school, as the CD for Hawaii State has roads for only the Island of Oahu...........No roads whatsoever for the other 5! Imagine my surprise!?
So, I have had a working sat nav for near to 10 years, and only now, as I am in California, have I been able to use it! (on a different 02)
Still think it's cool Tho' and James is rather erudite!
 

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From what I've read the 'white screen of death' is caused by the accidental erasure of the EEPROM containing the executable program. When the unit is powered down it stores the last known GPS location in EEPROM so the it can get a new satellite lock more quickly. (Old GPSs were notoriously slow to lock on). Unfortunately some genius decided to use the main program EEPROM to store this data and hence if you power down while it is writing this data it corrupts the entire EEPROM. To fix it you need to re-program the EEPROM. This requires a copy of the original EEPROM program and a means of flashing it. There used to be a guy in Latvia or somewhere who could do it but I doubt there is much call for this now.

The original GPS does have one useful feature in that it does understand about going 'off road'. Car sat navs like TomTom assume you are on the nearest road unless you really are in the wilderness (and then they sulk).
 

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From what I've read the 'white screen of death' is caused by the accidental erasure of the EEPROM containing the executable program. When the unit is powered down it stores the last known GPS location in EEPROM so the it can get a new satellite lock more quickly. (Old GPSs were notoriously slow to lock on). Unfortunately some genius decided to use the main program EEPROM to store this data and hence if you power down while it is writing this data it corrupts the entire EEPROM. To fix it you need to re-program the EEPROM. This requires a copy of the original EEPROM program and a means of flashing it. There used to be a guy in Latvia or somewhere who could do it but I doubt there is much call for this now.

The original GPS does have one useful feature in that it does understand about going 'off road'. Car sat navs like TomTom assume you are on the nearest road unless you really are in the wilderness (and then they sulk).
Yes, I agree the "bread crumb" feature is somewhat unique and useful you are traversing a trackless waste like the Kalahari desert. LR showing their offroad stuff.
 

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90% of the time it is the Nav. BMW's of the same era, with that lovely DSP system share the same trait. Unfortunately they are usually not interchangeable with BMWs, though some may be. It is rarely the head unit--that is basically just a screen, though my E39 is starting to develop pixel issues which is another can of fun.
 
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