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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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The primary problem isn't with the chain(s) - timing chains can typically be reused.

The problem manifest itself within one or both of the chain TENSIONERS, which are oil pressure reliant.

Extended manufacturer recommended oil service intervals, with the resulting "residue" often found within VVT's etc, is what appears to shorten the expected service life of such components.

Rob
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I guess noise comes from supercharger, not chains... Have you replaced supercharger nose\tail?
They are 2 different but similiar noises.

I bought a MY12 SC AB with 65k miles a few months ago and immediately did the supercharger coupler as that creates a knocking sound at idle. I used a new factory SC and the zz green coupler upgrade for eaton SCs.

I don't yet have the chains issue (my vin is in the TSB) but i expect to do it in the next few years when it comes up.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I used a new factory SC and the zz green coupler upgrade for eaton SCs.
Did I understand this correctly? Did you use a brand new OEM supercharger assembly and swapped the coupler to an upgraded one?
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Did I understand this correctly? Did you use a brand new OEM supercharger assembly and swapped the coupler to an upgraded one?
Yes. The solid green eaton composite coupler is a far superior design to the spring detention design OEM coupler. Learned that here 😆 and corroborated by several supercharger people.

I managed to get a brand new snout from Lucky8 for really cheap, price went up immediately after buying by several hundred dollars.

My snout bearings were fine but my friends are all either current or ex JLR techs and the concern of the bearings blowing down the road and having to do the job a 2nd time reassured me the whole new (or rebuilt) snout was the best way to go.
 

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Yes. The solid green eaton composite coupler is a far superior design to the spring detention design OEM coupler. Learned that here 😆 and corroborated by several supercharger people.

I managed to get a brand new snout from Lucky8 for really cheap, price went up immediately after buying by several hundred dollars.

My snout bearings were fine but my friends are all either current or ex JLR techs and the concern of the bearings blowing down the road and having to do the job a 2nd time reassured me the whole new (or rebuilt) snout was the best way to go.
Gotcha. I'll have to check out Lucky 8, first time I hear about them.

I was also thinking of doing the same thing, but getting a spare supercharger, replacing bearings and coupler and just swapping the whole unit when I do the timing chains. I'm pretty familiar with the Eatons myself. My thunderbirds use the eaton m90 and the coupler was a must if you were servicing the unit. Never heard of the bearings just going though...they would get noisy, but never heard of them just blowing out. Then again, different design than the jag units so everything is possible.
 

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Gotcha. I'll have to check out Lucky 8, first time I hear about them.

Snipped.

Never heard of the bearings just going though...they would get noisy, but never heard of them just blowing out. Then again, different design than the jag units so everything is possible.
My understanding is Lucky8 is more known in the discovery world than ours. I had bought on ebay a rebuilt snout which arrived damaged. For $50 more (appx $500) lucky8 had a BIN. Right after they raised the price to $700+.

There are a few diagnosis videos which discuss the sound and feeling difference between a bad coupler and bad bearings. It seemed to me that either is common but that's just my opinion.

Specifically tho Newport Beach LR had recently done just a coupler and within 5k miles the customer returned with blown snout bearings and the tech was pissed. It sounds like you've done these or similiar, and like timing chains it's definately not one of their favorite jobs to do :-(
 

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you can hear the chain flapping around and the check engine light comes on...it wont sneak up on you and surprise you
135k on my 2012. 3rd owner. (First owner was a commercial purchase, owned 5y ... Second owner was an individual, owned 2y)

No mention of it on my CARFAX, but they've missed items before. My ABS pump replacement simply showed up as "bleed brake system" :LOL:

100% dealer maintenance (except for 2 sets of tires, which I COMPLETELY understand) at the time I purchased. I opted to go with an independent shop in town and stuck with them. They seem to be reporting, too, for the most part (see above).

Used cars, sales and service, they sell nothing but used Land Rovers. Brought it in for two major fixes thus far when "it could be anything" and they nailed it on the first try for each.
 

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We have two 5L V8 LR's at home; 2011 RR HSE Lux and 2013 LR4 HSE. The RR is somewhere in mid 90's on clock, my son's LR4 is >115k mi. Both are 1-owner vehicles, we have serviced regularly. I would say the only deviation from LR service spec is that we have used the later 0W-20 JLR.5122 oil spec since it was introduced in late 2013, changing oil every 7500, normal scheduled service every 15k. Neither engine has exhibited any cam chain chatter. I have several friends around here w/5L JLR vehicles, none have had cam chain issues. Not saying its a myth, just product of typical internet forums that turn mole hills into mountains.
 

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We have two 5L V8 LR's at home; 2011 RR HSE Lux and 2013 LR4 HSE. The RR is somewhere in mid 90's on clock, my son's LR4 is >115k mi. Both are 1-owner vehicles, we have serviced regularly. I would say the only deviation from LR service spec is that we have used the later 0W-20 JLR.5122 oil spec since it was introduced in late 2013, changing oil every 7500, normal scheduled service every 15k. Neither engine has exhibited any cam chain chatter. I have several friends around here w/5L JLR vehicles, none have had cam chain issues. Not saying its a myth, just product of typical internet forums that turn mole hills into mountains.
It’s a self selecting group. People coming forward with something to say, to tell their story. People without those problem have a stronger tendency to stay silent.

If I believed the issue with 1st gen Durango’s dying just outside of warranty due to oil pump failures was as bad as the internet made it out to be, I’d not have purchased one. 282,000 miles and still chugging along.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Yes. The solid green eaton composite coupler is a far superior design to the spring detention design OEM coupler. Learned that here 😆 and corroborated by several supercharger people.

I managed to get a brand new snout from Lucky8 for really cheap, price went up immediately after buying by several hundred dollars.

My snout bearings were fine but my friends are all either current or ex JLR techs and the concern of the bearings blowing down the road and having to do the job a 2nd time reassured me the whole new (or rebuilt) snout was the best way to go.
Curious as to why you replaced the supercharger itself rather than only the coupler? Recommended through your research? I may do mine but just starting to dig in on the job.
 
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