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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all

I hope this post doesn’t raise the chagrin of the more knowledgeable folk here (ie everyone other than me).

I want to start doing minor services to my car myself. I have a copy of Rave – my threshold question is do I need to put the car on a hoist to do a minor service or will I be able to do it all if she is parked in a garage. For example, does the oil change require the car to be put on a hoist. Are there any other issues to consider – eg what sort of tools can anyone recommend.

I am sorry to ask such silly questions but those that have followed my posts will have gleaned how much I love my Ranger and how much I have done to it - especially as part of my recent engine rebuild. I will keep getting the major services done by my indy mechanic but I would prefer to do the minor ones myself – it’s not really a question of money rather the satisfaction of looking after my car myself.

I am looking to get either a Hawkeye or the Blackbox kit from Santa so that should have the diagnostic issue sorted out (still not sure what one to get – read the other forum to keep up with the views/experiences).

Does anyone here in Australia have any tips on where to buy the service kit (filters etc).

Thanks
Regards
Andrew
(Melbourne)
 

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No, you do not need a hoist. Just put the suspension at max lift and you can almost walk under the vehicle for oil changes and most other jobs. Access to most things is not a problem apart from a) heater matrix 'O' rings and b) HT leads onto coil packs ............ both require small, nimble hands and a lot of patience!
 

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Garvin said:
No, you do not need a hoist. Just put the suspension at max lift and you can almost walk under the vehicle for oil changes and most other jobs. Access to most things is not a problem apart from a) heater matrix 'O' rings and b) HT leads onto coil packs ............ both require small, nimble hands and a lot of patience!
Remember to keep a door or the tail gate open, that way the suspension won't try to level the car while your under it. I also used a trolly jack, just to be extra safe, not to lift the car, just as a support should one of the air springs give up.

SID.
 

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Fluid changes are a snap on these vehicles (except brake fluid, at least for me it was a pia). I don't have air suspension anymore, I can still change the oil without raising it, but for my convenience I put it up on jack stands. If you are cautious and follow instructions, you should have no problem doing it. I also do the service on both my vehicles just for the satisfaction :D . That and I don't like another person feeling up my vehicles, and will avoid taking it to a mechanic unless absolutely necessary.
 

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Land rovers DIY or very deep pockets the choice is yours.
onetime
 

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Hiya Andy,

What did Greg do to make you service yourself? :wink: Just kidding

Seriously, basic servicing on these is easy.

Basic Service Tools:
- Good Quality 1/2" Drive Socket Set (Sidchrome, Kingchrome etc...) Approx $200-$300
- Good Quality 1/4" Drive Socket Set (as above) Approx $80-$120
- Spanner Set
- Large Capacity Oil Tray (greater than 6 litres). Mine has a tray that screws on to the lid, so it doubles as a container.
- Axle Stands
- Screwdriver Set
- Oil Filter Wrench
- Some cheap or good quality multi-purpose tools. (shifting spanners, multi-grips, long nose pliers etc...
- Lots of Rags
- Degreaser, Oil Can, Siliconce Spray, CRC Spray Oil, Coolant Test Strips, Kerosene or Turps for parts washing
- Some plastic Tubs for washing parts
- Lots of Jam Jars for putting parts in
- Big Tub of Hand Cleaner
- An old towel, I wouldn't recommend the good white wedding towels


Further Tools that are a good idea or just make life easier:
- Large Floor Trolley Jack
- Slide Trolley (to help you slide under the car)
- Torque Wrench
- Offset Ring spanner set
- Good flourescent worklight
- Air Compressor (and rattle gun etc...)

A few tips that I have found over the years:
- Whenever you do bolts up to specified torque, such as steering or braking components, I usually put a small daub of white paint on the bolt to signify its done. That way when i'm 50k's from home wondering whether I did the drag link up, I just look under the car.
- As already said, pop a door before working under the car. Usually the upper tailgate is easiest, and it wont blow closed by itself.
- Don't rush, whenever i'm in a hurry I forget things. Doing an oil change on these isn't hard, but it's still not as quick as my Mazda 121, which I did an oil and filter in 15minutes in good clothes :dance:
- Don't take on too big a task without adequate time, avoids the above. Not so much of an issue if you have a 2nd car.
- Always do bolts up evenly, its a good habbit and it avoids breaking things. I usually do all bolts up finger tight, then tighten in an even sequence, diagonal or as specified in the book.
- Things such as tie rods usually don't want to come out, so hit the female part with a hammer. Do not hit the bolt.

Hope this helps, although its probably more advanced than what you'll be doing with that shiny new motor of yours. :D You'll have to bring it round one day, and you can have a look at my garage.

Stu

P.S. I usually get all my parts from Stu or Steve at Rovacraft in Ferntree Gully.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for your replies everyone.

Stubee – thanks for your detailed message. I’m going out to see Greg at AMV next Monday (about mid morning) to have my new Mark Adams chips installed if you can make it or I can drop by quickly afterwards if you are about. I don’t have any issues at all with AMV - I just want to get some competence for myself – I’m useless at these things – I should probably do some night course or something. Although it’s strange because when I was a kid my dad and I were always working on the series III landy we had and also dad’s MG midget but over time (30 years) one just forgets how to do things and then it probably just becomes a confidence issue as much as anything. Also, I want to take my family (got two young kids) for a drive around Aust maybe in the next 6 -12 months so I need to get some basic ‘hands on’ familiarity with the car. My wife is English and I want to take her to see some of the country. I’ll keep getting it serviced by AMV but I just want to have a crack at it myself just to know how to do it - I should probably take some night time tech course or something. I don’t have a garage (park on the street) so it’s not really feasible for me to do it all the time unless we move – that’s another story….

I can feel my engine really starting to loosen up now. Although it is stalling a bit at the moment – so some sort of idle issue – new chips might sort it out.

Take it easy.
Regards
Andy
 

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I don’t have a garage (park on the street) so it’s not really feasible for me to do it all the time unless we move – that’s another story….
If it makes you feel better. Previous to the purchase of my rr not even a year ago, I didn't know much about vehicles. You don't need to take night classes, just look things up online and in the service manual. You will quickly realize that vehicle engineers don't make things as complicated as they might seem. A good amount of perseverance and attention to detail will be your friend. As always, the forums will be here to assist you when you get into a sticky situation or two. Good luck, and start turning those wrenches :wink: .
 

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Those things will learn you mechanics and quickly :lol:
2 years ago, i only knew how to do an oil change.
Since, i did such things like heater o-rings, transmission fluid change, brakes, interior refurbishing, body shop for snorkel, air suspension the whole thing, underbody protection...

I'm confident in my truck since i know what i've really done with what quality of parts (i always swap for better like EBC brake pads, Bilstein...)
 

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I find that I learn more by doing. Maybe others don't, but that's just me. Confidence is paramount. I have a friend who won't even try the simplest of chores not because he doesn't have the ability, but because he is too afraid to mess things up. I've boogered up plenty of projects over the years, but learning how NOT to do it can be helpful as well. As long as it is not a safety thing, mind you.

So, you have the right attitude, so build up a library of infomation and go forth an fix ye vehicle.

P.S. I will add one other tool to the list.....cardboard. A large sheet of it from an old box or something. Place it under you and your oil containers when doing any type of fluid change. Even with a large pan you are still gonna miss or drip somewhere. And if you don't have a creeper (floor trolley?) then it's better than laying on a cold garage floor or gravel.

I also have an old set of overalls I wear when doing in-depth repair work.
 

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I would second that about the cardboard, too. Even if you have a decent sized pan down there, oil seems to find its way to splatter everywhere. So, have a nice large piece of cardboard, lots of shop towels, and a nice bottle of hand cleaner (Better yet, wear a vinyl or latex gloves, so you don't have to look like a mechanic w/ oil under your fingernails for a week).

I also started out as quite a novice couple years back, but w/ help from here and the RAVE, I've done quite a bit since then. For bare bones starter tool set, just have a decent socket wrench set, and that's it. If you're changing oil, I hope you'll be changing the filter as well, which on these vehicles is very easy to access.

Also, while at it, buy a grease gun, and lube the chassis as well-especially for the u-joints. It's a snap.
 

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The truck MUST be at standard ride height when replacing the differential lubricant.
Other heights will affect the height of the fill plug by rotating the axle, and you won't get the proper fill level.
Suck in it, and slide under at standard height.
Grease all the prop shaft & u-joint nipples while you're doing the diffs.
Get a couple swivel-type adapters for your grease gun.

ALWAYS open a door when you're under the truck.
I use the BOTTOM of the lift gate, since its fairly unlikely gravity will switch off long enough for the gate to raise back up.
If the little damper-looking things on the liftgate glass are weak, the glass could close unexpectedly.

English & metric sockets & wrenches; its always the other one.
 

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Do you know the miracle tool on any english car and especially the P38? Contact cleaner :dance: Saved my wallet many times
 
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