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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all and thanks for letting me join this group
I’m thinking of buying a 58 plate supercharged sport from a friend.
It’s only covered 54000 miles and is mint apart from a battery drain problem.
I can charge the battery but it’s dead within four hours after the ignition is off.

It’s a new battery and the correct one for the car.
One thing I’ve noticed is the positive terminal is not tight.
It’s not loose but I can slightly move it.
If I try to tighten it I know I’ll dmage it.

Is there a go to list of usual suspects that I can check and eliminate?

It’s supposedly been to two different specialists who can’t find the problem but I find this hard to believe?
My friend bought it on a whim and can’t afford to run it and I suspect he has not wanted to pay for diagnostics.

Thanks in advance ??
 

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Premium Member
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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516 Posts
Have the alternator looked at. Not a quick glance but a thorough load test then check all the grounding points. A search here should turn up a list of all the ground points and figure a way to secure the positive connections as well.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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862 Posts
You could try removing fuses that are always live. Find the one that stops the drain and that should narrow down your search.
 

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A drain that depleted the battery in four hours is likely a short to ground somewhere. Essentially, a positive wire that is grounded.

To narrow your search, you can conduct a parasitic drain test with a digital multimeter (DMM). You will need a decent quality meter with an internal fuse. Once you have a meter, there is a plethora of you tube videos that show how to perform a parasitic drain test. Also, the manual that comes with the meter will frequently cover the procedure.
Like Arby said above, once the meter is hooked up to a charged battery you can start pulling fuses and see which circuit drops the draw below 50-100ma. Once you have identified the circuit, you can start to look at the wiring and connectors for that circuit to find any exposed or shorted wiring or components.
One of the more common draws is a bad alternator. Failed diodes can drain a battery fairly quick. However in my experience, it usually happens overnight. That being said, I would disconnect the lead to the alternator first and see if that drops the amps on the DMM.

https://testmeterpro.com/parasitic-draw-test-with-a-multimeter/


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