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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
In February I purchased an 05 Range Rover L322 w/109k miles as an extra car/off road vehicle. The previous owner bought it as a project car and barely touched it, said it needed head gaskets. I brought it home and got it running in a few hours. It would start to overheat, but go back down after revving. I got all the air out over several days but the same thing happened after running for 20-30 min. I then did a compression check and found the outside cylinders(1,4,5,8) ran 150 while the inner 4 (2,3,6,7) had around 120-125. Maybe it could be head gaskets after all.

I pulled the engine and removed the cylinder heads and noticed deep scoring on 6 out of 8 cylinder walls. The pistons had the same scoring on the skirts. Didn’t find any damaged/broken rings. The heads were fine, no broken valves. The engine ran fine, sounded fine, and the timing chains/guides were not broken. What could have caused this much damage and the engine ran fine. I’ve parted out these engines with broken guides and didn’t see anything like this. Is this from excessive fuel washing the cylinder walls?

I just wanted to share with you all these pictures and get some feedback on what could have caused this.

Ryan

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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346 Posts
My guess is excessive fuel wash and/or worn rings. Engine #3 on my RR was an oil burner from the start. When I purchased the used engine it was leaking from every and any place an M62 could. My theory is the engine ran low on oil and messed up the rings. Then on the coldest day two winters ago my wife kept trying to start it until the battery died. When I took the oil pan and looked up I saw the tell tale signs of destroyed block. The engine oil was full of gas. When the engine was pulled I took a deeper look, out of curiousity, and it looked like yours.
 

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1,321 Posts
Gas wash, excessive NAS gas eats through the alusil coating

Never mind the M60 and some M62 non TUs had nikasil so this was a regular problem...
 

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Interesting that the upper and lower pieces of the oil control ring have the gap so close together. Also the compression ring gaps are close together. Curious if there are locating pins to keep the ring gaps 180 degrees apart like the old engines (iirc compression ones)i worked on in the 80"s. It also looks like damage from carbon particles. At first ithought some damage was from a rubbing wrist pin.
 
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