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I've searched high and low on the internet and haven't found much on the topic.

I have a 2003 Land Rover, Range Rover, HSE, BMW 4.4L V8 with 104k; that's showing signs of worn bearings ( rough shaking Idle, metal bearing fragments in the oil, and the lovely STOP! LOW OIL PRESSURE LIGHT) I'd like to document a Crank and Rod bearing change for the forum.

Problems getting started:

1) I can't find places (other than the dealership @ $32ea x 16) that sell bearings for my vehicle. Can I cross reference and use the same engine like a BMW X5, and order bearings from that? Anyone have any ideas?

2) I haven't found much information on the color codes for each bearing. From hearsay I understand that the standard size for the rods are red for upper, blue for lower, and yellow for the crank. Can anyone confirm this?
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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You are on the right track bearing wise. From what I have read you have to remove the bearings and see what the color code is and then order off that. Yes any M62 bearing should work if it is the same color code.

Before going any further I would examine your cylinder walls for gouges - I think that may be where your metal is coming from.

You can do this by dropping the lower oil pan after draining the oil and looking up at the piston skirts. Rotate the engine so you can see the cylinder walls. You will need a strong flash light as viewing is difficult, but most of the lower cylinders can be seen. The other thing you should do is drop a video camera down the spark plug holes and rotate the engine and look at the walls. You can pick up cheap cameras that are excellent quality on Ebay for under $15 - it will have an attachable mirror to help viewing - and it will connect to your laptop or Android phone. Pretty slick.

Once it passes these tests I would look into the bearings - actually you should be able to see a few of them with the lower oil pan removed.
 

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I think ghur in South Africa has likely had a bottom end apart and may be able to advance some info. The camera tip is a great idea. It seems like this has been tested and works. Dropping the pan would show whether the pick up screen is cluttered with bits from the t chain guides. I have read about the oil pump but the memory escapes me.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I replaced the rod bearings on 2 M62 engine overhauls but used after market parts supplied by an Indie. Cant remember the make but they were from a well know after market manufacturer and there were no colours involved. I gave the Indie the crank spec after machining and he supplied the bearings.

In both cases the engines were removed from the cars and then stripped completely so everything was easy to inspect. I am sure its possible to remove the upper sump from the engine to get to all the bearings with it still in the vehicle but will be a mission and I wouldn't recommend it.

I wonder if any of your problems are caused by timing chain/guide problems as Diff mentioned. Its possible that debris is blocking the oil pick up and causing low oil pressure and the metal seen in the oil may be from the timing chain rubbing on either the damaged and exposed guides or the timing cover. The first thing I would do is remove the lower sump plate and have a look.
 

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Three items: 1) ghur is correct one can get bearings with no color dots - I have seen them for sale. 2) One can see the lower cylinder walls with only the lower oil pan removed. I don't think anything can be removed because other things are in the way. It is a way to get a look - not a great look or a tell all look. I used it when my wife trashed my third engine and I found metal in the oil. My guides were brand new so I knew they were not the problem. My theory is she cylinder washed the pistons/cylinders and I ended up with metal on metal. When I took out the guides which were fairly new I inspected them before I put them on the fourth engine. They showed virtually no wear. 3) On the second engine the prior owner ran the guides down to metal on metal and this gouged the pistons and cylinder walls and ruined the block. The pickup was plugged and I believe oil starved the engine.

Another poster had this issue as he slowly inspected his engine. Pulling the heads revealed the full extent of his damage. My point is do some inspecting before making any choices or spending any money.
 
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