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Hey all,

Looking to replace my D2 that died on me and the thought of a L322 is quite appealing. Everything I've researched so far is that the 07-09 is the sweet spot for the V8 because they have the 4.4 and 4.2. I'm curious if you guys would be able to shed some light on the more common issues (other than air bags) that come up on these trucks. I didn't find a buyers guide on here so I figured I'd ask. I'd be using it for light - medium off road duty as I'd be using it mainly for the beach and camping. Thanks in advance.

Located in the North Eastern United States so no diesel option unfortunately.
 

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Up to '09 if you want the ability to convert to coils. Was told by my indie shop that '10-'12 aren't covered by the module that is supposed to suppress the EAS error codes.

If you're die hard EAS, then '10-'12 is safe. I have driven the older supercharged models, and just didn't feel the 400 HP. My Hemi had more pull than that. Now the 5.0L SC is where the power's at. It will continue to snap your neck approaching 150k miles and beyond.
 

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Up to '09 if you want the ability to convert to coils. Was told by my indie shop that '10-'12 aren't covered by the module that is supposed to suppress the EAS error codes.

If you're die hard EAS, then '10-'12 is safe. I have driven the older supercharged models, and just didn't feel the 400 HP. My Hemi had more pull than that. Now the 5.0L SC is where the power's at. It will continue to snap your neck approaching 150k miles and beyond.
I own an early production facelift MY06 and a MY12 Autobiography.

The 07-09 are better trucks due to the AJ133 Jaguar engine. Unlike the MY10-MY12 years the cooling system is far more dependable and reliable. Parts are less expensive, they dont use a CJB but have seperate ECMs, the interior will feel the same as a MY10 or MY12.

You will see many 2010-2012 with warranty replaced engines because the plastic cooling tubes (not hoses) fail, causing the engines to overheat and die. As mentioned above they went to a full CJB system in 10-12s which has its own issues.

Airbags are normal at 80/100k miles for any truck. Same parts for both years except supercharged. You can order normal UK parts lile bags/struts pretty cheaply from the UK if you dont mind a few days extra delay. On MY06 ive rebuilt all the air suspension, compressor and things, it wasn't horribly expensive and I did all of it myself in my garage.

I LOVE both my Rovers and just recently redid the cooling systems on both (preventative on the MY12 @65k miles cause I just bought it and service on the MY06 cause my water pump blew after replacing other soft hoses). Cost was about $2000 for each with my bro deal at the local JLR shop.

Keep in mind your mileage will vary (so to speak) but do yourself a favor and pickup an IIDTOOL. That thing has saved my life and saved me its cost $680 many times over. Support from [email protected] is above and beyond. Worth every penny.

Let me know any other questions and I'll give you my thoughts.
 
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I own an early production facelift MY06 and a MY12 Autobiography.

The 07-09 are better trucks due to the AJ133 Jaguar engine. Unlike the MY10-MY12 years the cooling system is far more dependable and reliable. Parts are less expensive, they dont use a CJB but have seperate ECMs, the interior will feel the same as a MY10 or MY12.

You will see many 2010-2012 with warranty replaced engines because the plastic cooling tubes (not hoses) fail, causing the engines to overheat and die. As mentioned above they went to a full CJB system in 10-12s which has its own issues.

Airbags are normal at 80/100k miles for any truck. Same parts for both years except supercharged. You can order normal UK parts lile bags/struts pretty cheaply from the UK if you dont mind a few days extra delay. On MY06 ive rebuilt all the air suspension, compressor and things, it wasn't horribly expensive and I did all of it myself in my garage.

I LOVE both my Rovers and just recently redid the cooling systems on both (preventative on the MY12 @65k miles cause I just bought it and service on the MY06 cause my water pump blew after replacing other soft hoses). Cost was about $2000 for each with my bro deal at the local JLR shop.

Keep in mind your mileage will vary (so to speak) but do yourself a favor and pickup an IIDTOOL. That thing has saved my life and saved me its cost $680 many times over. Support from [email protected] is above and beyond. Worth every penny.

Let me know any other questions and I'll give you my thoughts.
Very helpful thanks, GAP tool would be the first purchase after the Rangie. All my mates that have them swear by them so that would be a no brainer. I guess my biggest worry with the L322 is the complexity, I know Series trucks and Disco's (pulled the EAS out of the Disco because I didn't want to deal with it) so happy to do my own wrenching but I've heard the horror stories of electrical gremlins and the like.

How are the sunroofs? Same issues as the Disco's or less prone to leaking? Also are the CVs and polly bushings an issue like on the Disco 3's and 4's?
 

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They have a tendency to eat the rear hub upper and lower bushings, theres no way to lube them. I've been thru 3 sets so far (just crossed 200K miles this week though). If you hear a squeaking noise from the rear of the car as you go over bumps, its probably them. If you want coils instead of the EAs system buy an F150 or something like that, don't screw with the EAS system, they work great and enhance the ride. Watch for rust in the upper rear hatch bottom edge and especially around the rear wheel wells where the little rubber liner is located on the inside lip of the wheel opening. If rust starts on the wheelwells fix it fast, as it will spread quick. The tailgate lip will rust but its a pretty slow process. Watch for water in the rear corners of the truck (where the autio and Nav components are) and in the spare tire well. They all leak and the water will ruin your electronics, and rust out the bottom of the spare tire well.
 

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Very helpful thanks, GAP tool would be the first purchase after the Rangie. All my mates that have them swear by them so that would be a no brainer. I guess my biggest worry with the L322 is the complexity, I know Series trucks and Disco's (pulled the EAS out of the Disco because I didn't want to deal with it) so happy to do my own wrenching but I've heard the horror stories of electrical gremlins and the like.

How are the sunroofs? Same issues as the Disco's or less prone to leaking? Also are the CVs and polly bushings an issue like on the Disco 3's and 4's?
A lot of electrical issues are sorted out by simply owning an IIDTool. Being able to reflash modules and sort out real errors cuts a lot of the headache out. Unless you have failing modules (which you'll see errors for in the logs) most electrical issues are fixed with a new battery or alternator. Some things can be totally random, false alerts and sort themselves out. Again the IIDTool makes easy work of most issues saving you from dealer time and monies.

I have 144k on the MY06 and 65k on the MY12, no CV joint issue at all for me (knock on wood). Did rebuild the front end bushing/joints a bit ago @120k but that was frankly pretty cheap to do and did wonders for the handling. I've done most of my major services between 100k-120k. I've owned this Rover so long we've done everything short of major replacements like engine, gearbox or transmission. I've done A/C, Alternator, fuel pump, entire cooling system including pump, front end rebuild, new struts/bags in front, new front suspension valve block, compressor rebuild, rebuilt my headlights to fix the AFS, flashed every module with updates, and had the interior restored. I've gotten more than my money out of this Rover and have minimal maintenance per year now. My MY06 was a worst case scenario when I bought it as in a Rover with all the normal problems you're concerned about. I paid for my JLR education in service receipts ?

NOTE: had I read the first few pages of this forum I'd have known enough to identify issues I was blind too when I bought it. You have LR history, you should do better than I did.

Sunroof, can't say I have any issues other than poor factory alignment which is a super easy fix. I suppose in a wetter climate a person might suffer drain tube clogging as with any sunroof but no problems here. My MY12 tho I suspect needs a new seal due to wind noise but my MY06 is adjusted perfect and with 144k miles is quiet as can be inside with the shade open.

I personally don't have the rust concerns others mention here because we're west coast (no salted roads etc). But the biggest thing would be have it scoped out by a trusted JLR shop once you get one and be prepared to do any necessary preventive maintenance right away like transmission fluid flush and cooling system hoses. I'd guess a civilian should budget $2500-5000 USD per year on maintenance and service for the first few years. Seriously tho, keep up on your fluid changes and basic service, whatever Rover you get will serve you pretty well.


(just crossed 200K miles this week though).
Congratulations!! That's a pretty serious milestone.
 
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I LOVE both my Rovers and just recently redid the cooling systems on both (preventative on the MY12 @65k miles cause I just bought it and service on the MY06 cause my water pump blew after replacing other soft hoses). Cost was about $2000 for each with my bro deal at the local JLR shop.
You wouldn't happen to have a list of all cooling components that you replaced, would ya?
 

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They have a tendency to eat the rear hub upper and lower bushings, theres no way to lube them. I've been thru 3 sets so far (just crossed 200K miles this week though). If you hear a squeaking noise from the rear of the car as you go over bumps, its probably them. If you want coils instead of the EAs system buy an F150 or something like that, don't screw with the EAS system, they work great and enhance the ride. Watch for rust in the upper rear hatch bottom edge and especially around the rear wheel wells where the little rubber liner is located on the inside lip of the wheel opening. If rust starts on the wheelwells fix it fast, as it will spread quick. The tailgate lip will rust but its a pretty slow process. Watch for water in the rear corners of the truck (where the autio and Nav components are) and in the spare tire well. They all leak and the water will ruin your electronics, and rust out the bottom of the spare tire well.
Thanks for the info and congrats on the 200k.

The most I'd do would be sliders, metal transmission cover, winch and a roof rack. I have a Series project I want to get going that's going to be where I scratch the modding itch. L322 I'd keep stock, I want something that I'm not working on every weekend and I can just drive. If anything pulling EAS would be a downgrade because you'd loose the articulation from the cross linked system.
 

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A lot of electrical issues are sorted out by simply owning an IIDTool. Being able to reflash modules and sort out real errors cuts a lot of the headache out. Unless you have failing modules (which you'll see errors for in the logs) most electrical issues are fixed with a new battery or alternator. Some things can be totally random, false alerts and sort themselves out. Again the IIDTool makes easy work of most issues saving you from dealer time and monies.

I have 144k on the MY06 and 65k on the MY12, no CV joint issue at all for me (knock on wood). Did rebuild the front end bushing/joints a bit ago @120k but that was frankly pretty cheap to do and did wonders for the handling. I've done most of my major services between 100k-120k. I've owned this Rover so long we've done everything short of major replacements like engine, gearbox or transmission. I've done A/C, Alternator, fuel pump, entire cooling system including pump, front end rebuild, new struts/bags in front, new front suspension valve block, compressor rebuild, rebuilt my headlights to fix the AFS, flashed every module with updates, and had the interior restored. I've gotten more than my money out of this Rover and have minimal maintenance per year now. My MY06 was a worst case scenario when I bought it as in a Rover with all the normal problems you're concerned about. I paid for my JLR education in service receipts ?

NOTE: had I read the first few pages of this forum I'd have known enough to identify issues I was blind too when I bought it. You have LR history, you should do better than I did.

Sunroof, can't say I have any issues other than poor factory alignment which is a super easy fix. I suppose in a wetter climate a person might suffer drain tube clogging as with any sunroof but no problems here. My MY12 tho I suspect needs a new seal due to wind noise but my MY06 is adjusted perfect and with 144k miles is quiet as can be inside with the shade open.

I personally don't have the rust concerns others mention here because we're west coast (no salted roads etc). But the biggest thing would be have it scoped out by a trusted JLR shop once you get one and be prepared to do any necessary preventive maintenance right away like transmission fluid flush and cooling system hoses. I'd guess a civilian should budget $2500-5000 USD per year on maintenance and service for the first few years. Seriously tho, keep up on your fluid changes and basic service, whatever Rover you get will serve you pretty well.




Congratulations!! That's a pretty serious milestone.
Thanks for the info, it's been a great help. I guess now all I have to do is to start looking for the one I want that has a good service history. I will admit when I got my D2 in 2010 I let my emotions get away from me and I ended up paying for it in the long run (was a bad block and frame rust that finally made me pull the ripcord. Still, I loved that truck lol)
 

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You wouldn't happen to have a list of all cooling components that you replaced, would ya?
Yeah, I should have full parts lists here. I sourced most everything myself and saved about 1/2 over British Atlantic's cost for the same parts. So we don't hijack this thread PM me with exactly what you're curious about and which vehicle (MY06 or MY12). The MY06 was all cooling/heating hoses and water pump, the MY12 was a supercharger rebuild that I felt it best to do all the cooling/heating pipes which crack and fail but are hard to get to unless you take the top of the engine off. So on the MY12 we didn't do radiator hoses but the actual inlet composite pipes.

Side note: I'm working on a project to remake these coolant pipes out of metal (early 2010's, LR made these out of aluminum, then went composite with an aluminum joiner and now have superceded to full composite pipes). The feedback I've gotten is fantastic, if I can finish working out the issues we should be able to provide limited production runs for friends and family. This would be a GREAT improvement over the current design and prevent a lot of problems.
 

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Also, I have some enormous manual. 4251 page PDF document for my model year. Not sure what it is called, exactly, but it's 300 megs in size and I can't seem to find the original link for it.
 

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Have you driven an L322 yet? If you haven't, your in for for a real shock, compared to a D2. I think that for the $ the 07-09 L322 is the best (daily driver) ever designed by LR that is still a true truck. Gone are the un-fixable D2 leaking sunroofs, along with 3 amigos, lethargic ancient motor ect. There is no comparison between a L322 and a D2. So much that you may get emotional and want to buy the first one you test drive, but don't be tempted. There are lots of them out there. be patient and choose wisely. 07-09 are usually the safest bet. The SC will get up and go faster than a HSE, but it's still no rocket (too heavy). The SC is very powerful, but if someone beat on it badly, the tranny's don't hold up to that motor long (again too heavy). I would take a HSE in better condition with lower miles and service records over a beat SC. And believe me it's hard not to get on that big SC motor if you have it, SC whine is addicting. We went from a P38 to the L322 HSE, no comparison. We still love the P38 (known as "the beast"), and gave it to our son. If I could use 2 words to describe our L322 -Smooooth and quiet. And yes I was concerned about the complexity of the new truck too, compared to my SERIII, Classic, P38, and Jaguar SV8. You get over it quickly with help from this forum. Good luck.
Mark
 
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