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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I fired up my Rover today and waited about 30 seconds for the oil light to go out, but it never did. I popped back into the house to look up oil pump priming, and found the directions in the engine overhaul guide to check pump clearances and to prime with vaseline. Of course, I don't have any vaseline in the house, so I'll be heading to the store to get some today.

Does anyone have any advice or handy tricks to priming the oil pump with vaseline? Do I need to get all new seals, or can I reuse the ones I have?

Does it make any sense to try to fill the oil cooler lines from the top connector on the radiator? Or does it all just drain back to the sump anyway?

Thanks for your help,
Scott
 

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I assume that your pump is driven by the distributor rather than on the crank.

You just take the cover off the pump. Make sure the cogs inside do not fall out. Back Vaseline in as match as you can and put the cover back on. You should really replace the gasket, but if you can't find one, just be careful not to damage it when you take the cover off. You should have filled the oil filter before fitting it as well.

The best thing is to actually prime the system manually. This involves pulling the distributor back out. Get a long bolt and nut long enough to reach the oil pump drive at the bottom of the distributor and at least as thick as the drive shaft. Then grind a slot in the threaded end of the bolt to fit over the end of the pump drive. Put a nut on the very end of the bolt so that the bolt can't slip sideways off the shaft. Weld the nut to the bolt so you can't loose it in the engine. Cut the head off the bolt so it will fit in a electric drill. Then turn over the pump with the drill. You will feel it once it gets pressure as the drill will feel the load. Run it for at least a minute after feeling the pressure to make sure you get oil through the whoe motor.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I hadn't thought of the pump cogs falling out. Thanks for that pointer.

I like your idea using a nut and bolt that way to drive the oil pump. I'll buy those tomorrow.

Thank you again,
Scott
 

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It is a bit of a fine line as getting a bolt thick enough to fit over the shaft and still thin enough to fit in a drill. If you find that it does not quite fit over the shaft, drill out 2/3rds of the thread of the nut so it will fit over the shaft. The thread on the nut is not that important as you should weld it to the bolt anyhow and the thread just holds it square and in place while you weld it.

I would mark the cogs just in case they fall out. I just use liquid paper to mark things with. My mechanic tells me that the alignment doesn't matter, all I know is that they fell out on me once without marking them and I could not get oil pressure after that and had to get new cogs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, Ian. Those are great tips.

Do I run the drill clockwise, or counter-clockwise? I would hate to assume wrong.

Scott
 

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Have you actually had the pump out of the car before this happening?

I can't help thinking that there's quite a leap from the oil light coming on to thinking the pump needs priming? If you've been running normally it's far more likely that you have the oil pressure relief valve stuck open (assuming you don't just have a really low oil level).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes, the oil pump was quite literally out of the car, but not out of the timing cover. I replaced a leaking timing cover gasket a few weeks ago, but I've been busy at work so I couldn't get into the garage for a few weeks to finish putting the distributor in and get it running again. Well, this weekend I got it running, but had no oil pressure.

Scott
 
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