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anyone know someone installed locker(s) in the diff ?

For snow driving (offroad) I think lockers would have done amazing result, but I haven't found anyone for the L322
 

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Nothing aftermarket, but (I think) for 2007 there was an electronic rear diff option.

I am investigating an LSD with the guy who builds my BMW differentials. I am hoping that my 2003 RR rear diff is of similar construction to a 2003 BMW X5, if yes, then he can install an LSD for me.

I'll know more soon.
 

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There was a rear diff lock available from 2006 onwards, and I think it's standard in the 2010 models. Don't know how easy/hard it would be to retro-fit one though.
 

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Check with the major suppliers... ARB, Detroit and Trutrack. I am sure that someone makes one, it will be expensive, but would be worthwhile.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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The NV225 Transfer Box is a full time, permanent four wheel drive, torque splitting transmission with equal torque distribution to the front and rear propeller shafts. The transfer box has the following features:
Permanent four wheel drive with 50/50 torque split
Two speed, fully synchronised 'shift on the move' system with electronic control and operation
High range direct drive and low range via epicyclic gearset
Torsen® Type B torque sensing and torque biasing centre differential
Self lubricating oil pump system.
The transfer box is located under the vehicle in a subframe, behind the transmission. The units used on both the Td6 and V8 variants are identical, with the exception of the large mounting bush. The transfer box is manufactured by New Venture Gear in Roitzsch, Germany.
The transfer box receives an input from the transmission output shaft which is passed through the unit to two outputs for the front and rear propeller shafts.
The transfer box provides full time four wheel drive via a 50:50 torque sensing Torsen® differential. The unit design allows “shift on the move” from high to low range and visa versa. A planetary gearset with helical planetary pinion gears provides low range operation. When in low range, the planetary gearset provides a ratio of 2.69:1 which gives the vehicle an extremely low, low range crawl speed. High range is a direct drive from the transmission output shaft and provides a 1:1 ratio.

The front differential is a conventional design using a hypoid gear layout. This employs a hypoid bevel pinion gear and crown wheel, with the pinion offset below the centre line of the crown wheel. This design allows for a larger pinion gear to be used which has the advantages of increased gear strength and reduced operating noise.
The front differential is available in two ratios. V8 engine vehicles use a differential with a final drive ratio of 3.73:1 and Td6 engine vehicles use a final drive ratio of 4.10:1. The ratio is changed by changing the amount of teeth between the crown wheel drive gear and pinion gear. Therefore for a ratio of 4.10:1, the crown wheel drive gear will have 4.10 times more teeth than the pinion gear. This equates to the crown wheel drive gear having 41 teeth and the pinion gear having 10 teeth.

The rear differential is a conventional design using a hypoid gear layout, similar to the front differential. The rear differential is available in two ratios. V8 engine vehicles use a differential with a final drive ratio of 3.73:1 and Td6 engine vehicles use a final drive ratio of 4.10:1. The ratio is changed by changing the amount of teeth between the crown wheel drive gear and pinion gear. Therefore for a ratio of 4.10:1, the crown wheel drive gear will have 4.10 times more teeth than the pinion gear. This equates to the crown wheel drive gear having 41 teeth and the pinion gear having 10 teeth.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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The transfer box differential distribution is 50:50. Its a fix distribution ration? Or its variable from, 20:80 ans 80:20?
 

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Hello Phil,
Thank you for your answer, all its done by transfer box.
I have a problem on low speed and full steering the axells are not synchronized...makeing a light vibration I can fill it in front to the midle of the car.
Any ajustement to tranfer box, or a repair manual. I have a Land Rover Range Rover l322 Td6 year 2004.
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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For snow and ice, you are a lot better off with the traction control vs a locked diff.
I have locking diffs in my wheeling rig, and they get left alone when road driving on snow and ice.
What happens is that the rear will try to push the front out of line when locked, making for a very interesting ride indeed!
By all means try them, but for snow, they are all but useless.

Martin
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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888 Posts
I have a problem on low speed and full steering the axells are not synchronized...makeing a light vibration I can fill it in front to the midle of the car.
Any ajustement to tranfer box, or a repair manual. I have a Land Rover Range Rover l322 Td6 year 2004.
Possibly a problem with the vibration damper on the TD6. (see page 41-13 of the Service Procedures Manual)
 
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